Cases reported "Bronchial Spasm"

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1/3. Bee stings of children: when to perform endotracheal intubation?

    hymenoptera stings account for more deaths in united states that any other envenomation. Oropharyngeal stings, although rare, may produce life-threatening airway obstruction by way of localized swelling. We present 4 cases of bee stings in children that necessitated tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Two children had breathing difficulties at admission; the other 2 presented with minimal symptoms but were preventively intubated and mechanically ventilated. Orofacial bee sting victims should be given parenteral treatment with epinephrine, steroids, antihistamines, and inhalational bronchodilators even when they initially present with minimal symptoms, with general anaphylaxis management in large envenomations, as well as immediate endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours in patients with signs of airway compromise.
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2/3. timolol eyedrop-induced severe bronchospasm.

    A patient with glaucoma simplex and chronic pulmonary obstruction was treated with the non-selective beta-adrenergic blocking agent timolol in ophthalmic solution of 0.25% for 11/2 years, when he had daily asthma attacks. In a provocation test, forced expiratory volume in the first second was reduced by 56% and bradycardia was induced after application of two drops of timolol eyedrops 0.25%. The severe systemic side-effects of timolol, when used as eyedrops, are related to the liver bypass and perhaps to the fast absorption from the cornea. It is suggested that when timolol ophthalmic solution is given for the first time to glaucoma patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, they should be observed for one hour with special reference to difficulty in breathing.
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3/3. Ketorolac-induced bronchospasm in an aspirin-intolerant patient.

    A patient, in her mid-twenties, presented with "severe polypoid sinusitis" for sphenoethmoidectomy under general anesthesia. Upon preoperative medical evaluation, it was discovered that she was "allergic" to aspirin and suffered from stress-induced asthma. Before induction of anesthesia, the patient was administered intravenous hydrocortisone and two puffs of her albuterol inhaler to prevent a possible bronchospasm due to stress of the surgery or irritation from the endotracheal tube or other stimuli. The patient was maintained throughout the case with an inhalation anesthetic for its bronchodilatory effect. The surgery proceeded unremarkably, and the patient was then administered ketorolac tromethamine for postoperative pain. After an awake extubation, the patient was transferred to the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for further monitoring. After 15 min in the PACU, the patient claimed having difficulty breathing. She was then administered terbutaline to produce bronchodilation, but her condition did not improve. Shortly thereafter, aminophylline, midazolam, and methylprednisolone were also administered intravenously. Meanwhile, the patient had to be reintubated and placed on ventilator support with heavy sedation. At this point, it was discovered that ketorolac may have been the cause of this response. Although the patient's condition began to improve, the histamine H1- and H2-receptor blockers diphenhydramine and ranitidine were coadministered. When the patient's condition returned toward normal, she was extubated. The patient's breathing continued to improve. Thereafter, she was transferred to an overnight observation bed and later dismissed to return home. The patient was advised of the episode and warned against future intake of other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.
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