Cases reported "Bronchiectasis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. Lady Windermere syndrome: middle lobe bronchiectasis and mycobacterium avium complex infection due to voluntary cough suppression.

    An 81-year-old woman who presented with middle lobe bronchiectasis and mycobacterium avium complex infection is described. She had a history of habitual suppression of cough, as in Lady Windermere syndrome. She was thin and had mild kyphoscoliosis but had no history of smoking or connective tissue disease. The middle lobe and lingula are predisposed to chronic inflammation because of their particular anatomic structures. Inability to clear the secretions from the airway due to voluntary cough suppression may predispose to bronchiectasis and M. avium complex infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. Unilateral bronchiectasis and esophageal dysmotility in congenital adult tracheoesophageal fistula.

    Tracheoesophageal fistulas (TEF) in adults are most commonly neoplastic, and very rarely congenital in nature. We report a 45-year-old Hispanic male with TEF and initial presentation of minimal hemoptysis. The patient had radiographic evidence of unilateral upper lobe (RUL) bronchiectasis, massive esophageal dilatation, and dysmotility. However, there was no evidence of esophageal malignancy, achalasia, or Chagas' disease. bronchoscopy revealed a large TEF in the posterior wall of trachea, which was not visualized on esophagram or esophagoscopy. bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures grew mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). Our report illustrates that idiopathic, or congenital, TEF can be associated with esophageal dysmotility, adulthood bronchiectasis, and atypical mycobacterial superinfection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma arising in a patient with bronchiectasis and chronic Mycobacterium avium infection.

    We describe a 67-year-old woman with bronchiectasis and mycobacterium avium complex infection who underwent wedge resection of her pulmonary infiltrates because they were progressing despite antibiotic therapy. In addition to the expected granulomatous changes, she was found to have a B-cell lymphoma of bronchus associated lymphoid tissue (BALT). Despite normal bone marrow morphology, marrow involvement was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Her lymphoma remains suppressed with antimycobacterial therapy 6 months after resection of bulk disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. Infection with the mycobacterium avium complex in patients without predisposing conditions: a case report and literature review.

    nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), especially Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC), has been considered responsible for human disease, especially in hiv patients. Nevertheless, it has been diagnosed in immunocompetent elderly men, frequently with previous pulmonary disease: chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), complications of tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis and bronchiectasis. We relate the case of a female patient, 51 years old, with continuously acid fast bacilli (AFB) smears and with three previous treatments, which were conducted at the multiresistant tuberculosis (MRTB) service. MAC was identified in the sputum culture, and she received treatment for one year. The posterior sputum exams were negative. The cavity lesions observed in the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) were reduced, and some of the nodule lesions became bronchiectasis, even after the end of treatment. We agree with the literature reports that indicate that MAC is the cause of bronchiectasis. It is necessary to identify the type of mycobacteria in immunocompetent individuals with positive AFB smears that do not become negative with tuberculosis treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. Endobronchial mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection in a patient with AIDS.

    The pulmonary manifestations of AIDS are well described in the medical literature; however, MAI infection presenting as an endobronchial lesion has not, to our knowledge, been reported in a patient with AIDS. We report a unique case of an AIDS patient who developed endobronchial polypoid lesions secondary to MAI infection. Complications resulting from these lesions included hemoptysis and later bronchiectasis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66666666666667
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Increased suppressor cell activity in a patient with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare pulmonary disease and hypogammaglobulinemia.

    Immunologic studies were done in a patient with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia, bronchiectasis and M. avium intracellulare pulmonary infection. Adherent cells from the patient were found to suppress the proliferative response of normal control cells to PPD antigen. The suppression seemed to be mediated by prostaglandin as it was reversed by indomethacin. Increased suppressor cell activity may play an important role in the pathogenesis of mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection by permitting the transformation of a status of colonization by the organism in pre-existing pulmonary conditions into an invasive, progressive disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. hypersensitivity anaphylactoid reaction to pefloxacin in a patient with AIDS.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a life-threatening anaphylactoid reaction to oral pefloxacin in a patient with AIDS and to review the pertinent literature. CASE SUMMARY: A 32-year-old woman with AIDS developed an anaphylactoid reaction following a second exposure to oral pefloxacin. This reaction was characterized by severe hypotension, dizziness, itching, and fever. DISCUSSION: fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. They are used frequently in patients with AIDS for numerous indications, including treatment of mycobacterium avium complex. pefloxacin, a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, was introduced in france in 1985. Since then, many patients with AIDS have been treated with this drug. Several cases of anaphylactoid reactions to ciprofloxacin have been documented in patients with hiv infection. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an anaphylactoid reaction to pefloxacin in a patient with AIDS. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for continued vigilance in the reporting of adverse drug reactions in patients with AIDS, especially with new drug. Also, care must be taken in introducing drugs, including fluoroquinolones, to this patient population.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = avium
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Bronchiectasis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.