Cases reported "Bronchogenic Cyst"

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1/12. A paraesophageal bronchogenic cyst with esophageal communication.

    Paraesophageal bronchogenic cysts are a rare developmental anomaly of the upper digestive tract. Although often asymptomatic, their growth can cause severe symptoms and complications because of the location. The diagnosis is difficult and is mostly by histopathologic findings after extirpation of the cyst. The authors present a case of a paraesophageal bronchogenic cyst, of typical histologic structure (ciliated epithelium and hyaline cartilage) connected with the esophageal lumen by a narrow canal composed of stratified squamous epithelium. According to the available literature, only three cases of bronchogenic paraesophageal cysts with esophageal communication have been reported.
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2/12. Complex bronchopulmonary foregut malformation: extralobar pulmonary sequestration associated with a duplication cyst of mixed bronchogenic and oesophageal type.

    We report a 13-year-old girl with an unusual, complex bronchopulmonary foregut malformation. The malformation included extralobar pulmonary sequestration and a duplication cyst of mixed bronchogenic and oesophageal type. Preoperative CT and MRI demonstrated the cystic and solid portions of the mass and indicated an aberrant vascular supply, suggesting the possibility of bronchopulmonary foregut malformation and several other differential diagnoses. A direct communication between the cyst and the bronchus of the sequestrated lung was found on pathological examination. This unusual combination of an extralobar pulmonary sequestration and a foregut cyst points to a common embryological pathogenesis.
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3/12. The multiple facets of pulmonary sequestration.

    PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to identify the proportion of sequestrations that were atypical or associated with other entities, such as congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations, communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformations, bronchogenic cyst, and scimitar syndrome. methods: All charts of patients with pulmonary sequestration admitted at 2 children's hospitals from 1982 to July 1999 were reviewed retrospectively. The authors included all anomalies with a systemic arterial supply or without bronchial connection. RESULTS: Only 22 of the 39 patients (56%) had a classic isolated extralobar or intralobar sequestration, whereas the others presented with a spectrum of anomalies. Of the 13 cases diagnosed prenatally, 85% were asymptomatic at birth. In contrast, 26 cases diagnosed postnatally were all symptomatic, with those patients less than 2 weeks old presenting with various degrees of respiratory distress, and those older than 2 weeks old presenting with respiratory infections. The correct diagnosis was made preoperatively in 59% of cases. Only 4 patients did not undergo resection of their lesion, of which, 1 underwent interventional radiology with embolization of the anomalous arterial supply. Follow-up issues of importance included pneumonia, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux, and pectus excavatum. CONCLUSIONS: Sequestrations represent a spectrum of anomalies that overlap with other lung lesions. To facilitate management, they should be described according to their (1) connection to the tracheobronchial tree, (2) visceral pleura, (3) arterial supply, (4) venous drainage, (5) foregut communication, (6) histology, (7) mixed/multiple lesions, and (8) whether there are associated anomalies. Surgeons should be aware that approximately 50% of sequestrations could be atypical or associated with other anomalies. This should be kept in mind when weighing the benefits of resection versus conservative management of pulmonary sequestrations.
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4/12. Cutaneous bronchogenic cyst of the abdominal wall.

    We report a case of the unusual location of a cutaneous bronchogenic cyst on the abdominal wall. The patient was a 9-month-old boy who had presented with a 1.5 cm-sized polypoid mass, present since birth. Pathological examination of the excised mass revealed multiple small cystic structures surrounded by the fibroadipose tissue. The lining epithelium consisted of either pseudostratified ciliated columnar epithelium with goblet cells or a single layer of ciliated or non-ciliated cuboidal to columnar cells. The cystic walls contained a well-developed smooth muscle bundle, mucous glands and hyaline cartilage plate. This lesion was adherent to the peritoneum, but there was no direct communication with the abdominal cavity. Cutaneous bronchogenic cyst located in the abdominal wall has not been described in the English literature. The present case suggests a possible origin from a downward migration, from the sequestered bud of a tracheobronchial tree primordium along the midline of the body surface, during embryonic development.
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5/12. Bronchopulmonary foregut malformation: a large bronchogenic cyst communicating with an esophageal duplication cyst.

    A 1-year-old boy with a bronchopulmonary foregut malformation presented with a large mediastinal bronchogenic cyst associated with pulmonary sequestration, a cervical esophageal duplication cyst, a bronchial communication between these cysts, and 2 small bronchogenic cysts around the communication. These lesions were resected followed by an uneventful recovery.
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6/12. Intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst: spontaneous dissolution?

    A well-demarcated, non-calcific, solitary pulmonary nodule was initially discovered 3 v2 years ago on a chest radiograph in a 43-year-old woman with recurrent acute bronchitis. The nodNle had been stationary with minimal change in size until the last radiographic examination which showed total disappearance of the nodule. A thin-walled, air-filled cyst was, however, demonstrated by computed tomography at the same location. The nodule was believed to be an intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst which developed communication with airway with discharge of its watery content, leading to its pseudo resolution.
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7/12. Subdiaphragmatic bronchogenic cyst with gastric communication.

    Upper gastrointestinal series and computed tomography of the abdomen in an elderly women demonstrated a large multiloculated mass in the left subphrenic space that communicated with the fundus. The resected specimen showed histopathological features of bronchopulmonary foregut malformation.
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8/12. Subdiaphragmatic bronchogenic cyst with communication to the stomach: a case report.

    A case of an infradiaphragmatic bronchogenic cyst in an adult patient presenting with nausea, vomiting, and epigastric discomfort is reported. An upper gastrointestinal series showed a multiloculated cyst communicating with the stomach via a patent fistulous tract. At laparotomy the cyst was found to be connected to and communicating with the posterolateral portion of the stomach. The cyst was completely below the diaphragm and received its blood supply from a branch of the abdominal aorta. Histologically, the cyst was composed of smooth muscle, respiratory epithelium, cartilage, and submucous glands. A review of the literature reveals that this case of bronchogenic cyst was unique in that it was located entirely beneath the diaphragm, was not associated with a diaphragmatic hernia or other congenital anomaly, and maintained a patent communication with a portion of the gastrointestinal tract, ie, the stomach, reminiscent of its embryological development.
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9/12. Pedicled pericardial patch repair of a carinal bronchogenic cyst.

    Bronchogenic cysts should be completely removed. Small communications with the tracheobronchial tree occur, but extensive involvement is rare. A case of bronchogenic cyst replacing the carina and the medial wall of the right and left main bronchi is presented. Resection and reconstruction was accomplished by using a pedicled pericardial patch to close the defect created by removal of the bronchogenic cyst. Follow-up at 2 years shows an excellent result.
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10/12. Giant bronchogenic cyst masquerading as tension pneumothorax. Radiographic and CT findings.

    Pulmonary bronchogenic cysts with tracheobronchial communication may occasionally mimic tension pneumothorax leading to unnecessary thoracostomy. We describe such a case to emphasize that cautious identification of the direction of displacement of the collapsed lung tissue on chest radiograph or computed tomography (CT) may help in differentiating these two diseases. Tension pneumothorax should lead to centripetal compression of the ipsilateral lung toward the hilum while giant bronchogenic cysts result in centrifugal displacement of the adjacent lung away from the hilum.
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