Cases reported "Bronchogenic Cyst"

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1/16. Thoracoscopic excision with mini-thoracotomy for a bronchogenic cyst of the esophagus.

    A 19 year-old man with a history of dysphagia and chest pain was diagnosed as having a cyst of the esophagus by endoscopic ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. The patient's bronchogenic cyst was treated by video-assisted thoracoscopic excision with mini-thoracotomy. This procedure is applicable for patients who require repair of the esophageal wall after excision of a lesion and reduces post-operative complications.
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2/16. prenatal diagnosis of a bronchogenic cyst in an unusual site.

    We report a rare case of a subdiaphragmatic cyst, diagnosed prenatally during routine ultrasound screening at 25 weeks' gestation. Serial ultrasonographic evaluation demonstrated a slight increase in the size of the cyst during pregnancy. On the basis of the anatomic site and the sonographic features of the lesion, four diagnostic hypotheses were postulated: cystic neuroblastoma, adrenal hemorrhage, duplication of the inferior third of the esophagus and retroperitoneal cystic lymphangioma. A healthy baby, weighing 3300 g and with Apgar scores of 8 and 9, was delivered vaginally at term. He underwent successful surgery at the age of 3 months. The post-operative course was uneventful and the baby is currently doing well. histology revealed a bronchogenic cyst.
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3/16. bronchogenic cyst infected by salmonella enteritidis followed gastroenteritis.

    Congenital bronchogenic cysts of the lung and mediastinum develop from the ventral foregut during embryogenesis. Bronchogenic cysts are seldom seen in the adults and most are thought to be asymptomatic and free of complications unless they become infected or are large enough to cause pressure on contiguous vital structures such as the tracheal carina, the lung or the esophagus. We present the unique case of a 24-year-old man who developed respiratory symptoms after salmonella enteritidis infected bronchogenic cyst following Salmonella gastroenteritis.
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4/16. life threatening complications caused by bronchogenic and oesophageal duplication cysts in a child.

    An 11-year-old girl presented with severe respiratory distress, fever and septic manifestations. Computed tomography scan (CT) of the chest showed 2 separate superior and posterior mediastinal cysts, the upper one causing severe extrinsic compression of the trachea, and the oesophagus, while the lower cyst was at the subcarinal region compressing the 2 major bronchi. Emergency thoracotomy was performed permitting complete resection of intra-mural oesophageal enteric cyst, and a subcarinal bronchogenic cyst. The postoperative course was uneventful.
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keywords = esophagus
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5/16. Thoracoscopic excision of a paraesophageal bronchogenic cyst in a child.

    BACKGROUND: Bronchogenic cysts are not uncommon in either children or adults. In children, they comprise approximately 6% of all mediastinal masses. Their presentation can range from an asymptomatic incidental finding to sudden respiratory distress. CASE REPORT: Video-assisted thoracoscopy was utilized to remove a bronchogenic cyst that was densely adherent to the adjacent esophagus in a child. This was accomplished with a Harmonic scalpel. The chest tube was removed on postoperative day 1, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. An esophagogram obtained 2 weeks after surgery was normal, and the patient's preoperative symptoms had not returned. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchogenic cysts should be considered in the differential diagnoses for mediastinal masses at any age. Given their benign nature, thoracoscopy offers an excellent alternative to open thoracotomy for their removal.
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keywords = esophagus
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6/16. Infrared illumination during thoracoscopic excision of mediastinal bronchogenic cysts.

    Bronchogenic cysts are congenital abnormalities that occur due to abnormal development of the ventral foregut. Most share a common wall with the esophagus. Excision is indicated to prevent complications such as mass effect or infection. Thoracoscopic resection has been previously described. Injury to the adjacent esophagus is a potential complication due to its close proximity, and placement of an esophageal bougie is often used to help identify the esophagus. We describe a technique utilizing the InfraVision Esophageal Kit (Stryker endoscopy, San Jose, california) to assist in the illumination of the esophagus during dissection of mediastinal bronchogenic cysts in 3 children. The system consists of an infrared light-emitting probe and an infraredsensing endoscopic camera. The probe is easily placed prior to surgery, and allows for easy identification of the esophagus. It also clarifies the dissection plane between the cyst and the esophagus. This technique facilitates dissection of mediastinal cysts and helps avoid injury to the esophagus. It was found to be safe and effective in 3 children. The system may be applicable to other esophageal operations such as Nissen fundoplication or Heller myotomy.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = esophagus
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7/16. Cervical bronchogenic cyst: asymptomatic neck mass in an adult male.

    Bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital malformations of ventral foregut development. They are usually located in the mediastinum and intrapulmonary regions. Localization in the cervical area is unusual and the majority of cases reported have been found in the pediatric population: the literature reports few cases in adults. We describe a 57-year-old male who presented an asymptomatic right lateral neck mass. Diagnostic studies included chest X-ray, pharyngo-esophagus double-contrast X-ray, computed tomography (CT), and bronchoscopy. The mass was excised through a transverse right cervical skin incision. The right lateral neck mass of the patient was identified as a bronchogenic cyst. The embryology, the presentation, the pathological and radiological evaluation, treatment of the cyst and a review of the English literature are reported in this paper. Cervical bronchogenic cysts are usually diagnosed in the pediatric population; these lesions are rare in adults. We suggest that the clinical observation of an asymptomatic lateral neck mass in an adult should include the possibility of a bronchogenic cyst in the differential diagnosis. Surgical excision is the elective treatment for this tumor, in order to prevent complications including infection, compression symptoms, malignant transformation, and the rare but fatal air embolism.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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8/16. bronchogenic cyst of the esophagus: clinical and imaging features of seven cases.

    Seven unusual cases of esophageal bronchogenic cyst (EBC) are presented. Different from mediastinal or pulmonary bronchogenic cysts, EBCs predominately affect young women (six out of seven cases; mean age, 29.9 years), and clinically, such cases were characterized by dysphagia and chest pain, especially during exercise. On radiographs and computed tomographs, EBCs typically appeared as 3- to 4-cm midthoracic cystic masses close abutting to the midthoracic esophagus. Rarely, exophytic lower thoracic EBC may mimic lung nodule. Total cyst excision usually offers satisfactory outcome with no recurrence in long-term follow-up.
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keywords = esophagus
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9/16. air-filled, multilocular, bronchopulmonary foregut duplication cyst of the mediastinum. Unusual computed tomography appearance.

    Mediastinal bronchopulmonary foregut duplication cysts are usually identified on computed tomography (CT) as well-defined masses of water density that may contain rim calcification. Occasionally they are heterogenous in attenuation or are of intermediate or high attenuation due to contained calcium. communication with the tracheobronchial tree or esophagus is rare. We report a bronchogenic cyst that communicated with the trachea and was identified by CT as a multilocolor, completely air-filled cyst adjacent to the trachea and esophagus. This appearance of a bronchogenic cyst has received little attention in the literature.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = esophagus
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10/16. back pain with a congenital cyst of the esophagus.

    We report a 31-year-old man with a bronchogenic type of congenital esophageal cyst, which was discovered in the course of diagnostic evaluation for thoracic back pain, fever, and diarrhea. He was treated successfully by surgical excision of the cyst. The embryology, classification, and symptoms of esophageal cysts are reviewed, along with useful diagnostic tests and procedures. Ordinary radiography, computed tomography, sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging contribute to diagnostic accuracy. Special mention is made of percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PNAB) as an adjunct diagnostic procedure. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = esophagus
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