Cases reported "Bronchopneumonia"

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1/19. Respiratory failure after liver transplantation.

    A rapidly growing haemangioendothelial sarcoma of the liver in a twenty-two year old woman was treated by liver transplantation. disseminated intravascular coagulation resulted in massive blood loss during surgery, and contributed to the death of the patient from respiratory failure on the fourth post-operative day, despite continuous post-operative intermittent positive-pressure ventilation. Other factors leading to her respiratory failure are discussed. There was no evidence of dysfunction in the transplanted liver.
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2/19. Sudden death of an infant with 'an early epileptic encephalopathy'.

    This article reports an autopsy case of sudden death of an infant with an infrequent encephalopathy involving epileptic episodes. The infant was a 1-year and 10-month-old boy, who had a history of the first convulsive seizures in the third month after birth. The clinical diagnosis was described as 'an early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-bursts' (Ohtahara syndrome). On a winter day, he was collapsed following a high fever and was already dead on the arrival at a hospital. The body was small for the age and poorly nourished. The autopsy and postmortem magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) of formalin-fixed brain revealed advanced unsymmetric brain atrophy with cortical dysplasia, which were prominent in the left temporal and right occipital lobes, and sclerotic atrophy of the parahippocampal gyri, additionally showing a feature of the olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. However, the cause of death was pathologically and microbiologically determined as bacterial bronchopneumonia following pulmonary infection of the influenza a virus. In sudden death cases of physically handicapped infants, the investigation of viral infection in consideration of an epidemiological survey is important even when the death can be pathomorphologically explained.
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3/19. fatal outcome of varicella in children.

    Varicella or chicken-pox are one of the most frequent diseases in childhood. Severe or even lethal complications are rare (in about 0.03 per thousand ). Our paper presents two cases of varicella infections leading to sudden deaths (3- and 7-year-old children). In one of these cases, the paediatrician in charge was accused of an impaired medical treatment. Both of the children showed multiple typical efflorescences in different stages. Furthermore were observed affections of the respiratory tracts and serious involvements of the hearts, the lungs, and the livers. In one case an immunological identification could be made of an acute varicella infection. Based on autoptical, histological, bacteriological, virological, and neuropathological findings is given an analysis of such uncommon and severe courses of chicken-pox in children being identified as haemorrhagic form and massive abscess-forming varicella pneumonia.
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4/19. Sudden death in growth hormone-treated children with prader-willi syndrome.

    A 4-year-old boy with prader-willi syndrome died suddenly while asleep on day 67 of growth hormone treatment. During treatment, snoring had worsened. autopsy showed multifocal bronchopneumonia. This case and two others recently published suggest that growth hormone may be associated with obstructive apnea, respiratory infection, and sudden death in this condition.
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5/19. Clinicopathology of severe acute respiratory syndrome: an autopsy case report.

    In mid-April 2003, a major outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) developed in taiwan. During the outbreak, SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was documented in 346 patients and 73 of them died. autopsy was performed in 9 of the suspected SARS patients who died during the outbreak, but SARS was the cause of death in only 1 of these patients. Here we report the histological features of this patient and their clinicopathological correlations. The patient, a 36-year-old Indonesian woman, was a caretaker working for a Taiwanese family. She stayed in Taipei Jen-Chi Hospital from April 10 to April 19 to take care of her elderly employer. She developed fever on April 21 and respiratory distress on April 25, and received ribavirin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and steroid. The respiratory distress persisted and worsened, and intubation was performed on April 27. The respiratory condition improved initially after mechanical ventilation, but subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum developed on May 1. Her condition deteriorated rapidly and she died on May 2, 11 days after the onset of fever. autopsy was performed on the same day. Histologically, the lungs showed severe diffuse alveolar damage and bronchopneumonia, but no viral inclusion. The spleen and lymph nodes revealed lymphoid depletion and the liver showed microvesicular steatosis. No specific pathological change was seen in the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys. SARS-CoV genome was detected in the nasopharyngeal aspirate and the autopsy lung specimen.
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6/19. Toxicological and histopathological analysis of a patient who died nine days after a single intravenous dose of methamphetamine: a case report.

    A man in his late twenties collapsed shortly after intravenously injecting himself with methamphetamine (MA). He slipped into a deep coma and remained in this condition for 9 days, until his death. autopsy revealed severe brain edema and localized subarachnoid hemorrhages in the cerebrum and cerebellum. Histopathological examination revealed myocardial necrosis in the left ventricle, rhabdomyolysis and bronchopneumonia. Blood derived from the cadaver was found to have high levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, suggesting he experienced acute renal failure probably due to rhabdomyolysis. Most of the postmortem findings were consistent with MA poisoning. The patient's bronchopneumonia may have represented a hypostatic pneumonia that developed as a result of his deep coma. While the patient's brain edema, myocardial necrosis and rhabdomyolysis were diagnosed soon after admission, his bronchopneumonia and acute renal failure only occurred 6 and 8 days later, respectively. Although MA was not detected in the cadaver's blood, urine or liver, analysis of the decedent's hair using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed its presence at a concentration of 1.1 ng/mg. Based on these findings, we concluded that the patient's cause of death was multiorganopathy resulting from MA poisoning. This case suggests that the postmortem diagnosis of MA poisoning in patients who survive for relatively longer periods after drug injection should include toxicological hair analysis in combination with histopathological and postmortem physiochemical examination.
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7/19. Fulminant tuberculous bronchopneumonia in a young hong kong Chinese woman.

    A 24-yr-old, previously healthy Chinese woman presented with symptoms of acute bronchopneumonia which led to acute respiratory failure and death 6 days after admission to hospital despite intensive antibiotic treatment. autopsy showed acute tuberculous bronchopneumonia of the acinar type. This is a rare presentation and outcome of tuberculous infection in hong kong, where 124 cases per 100,000 population were notified in 1988, and indicates that tuberculosis can mimic acute bronchopneumonia and should be considered in cases so presenting, particularly when there is no growth on routine culture and no response to conventional antibiotics. Acute respiratory failure developing in such cases can cause a delay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis.
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8/19. moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis bacteremia. A case report and literature review.

    moraxella catarrhalis is increasingly recognized as a cause of pulmonary and upper airway disease, but bacteremia remains unusual. We treated a 71-year-old man who died of rapidly progressive bacteremic M catarrhalis bronchopneumonia. This case, and a review of the 27 previously reported M catarrhalis bacteremias in the literature, demonstrated that M catarrhalis can be a virulent organism capable of causing serious infection and death in both immunocompetent and compromised hosts.
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9/19. Death associated with inadvertent hydrocodone overdose in a child with a respiratory tract infection.

    A 3-year-old child died of the combined effects of a bacterial superinfection and a relative overdose of hydrocodone prescribed for a cough due to a presumed viral respiratory tract infection. This case illustrates the importance of evaluating the effects of prescribed medication in assessing the cause and mechanism of death in children dying suddenly of presumed natural disease.
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10/19. Death-scene investigation in sudden infant death.

    We conducted death-scene investigations in 26 consecutive cases in which a presumptive diagnosis of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was made and the infants were brought to the emergency room of the Kings County Hospital Center between October 1983 and January 1985. In six cases, we observed strong circumstantial evidence of accidental death. In 18 other cases, we discovered various possible causes of death other than SIDS, including accidental asphyxiation by an object in the crib or bassinet, smothering by overlying while sharing a bed, hyperthermia, and shaken baby syndrome. This study suggests that many sudden deaths of infants have a definable cause that can be revealed by careful investigation of the death scene and that the extremely high rate of SIDS (4.2 per 1000 live births) reported in the population of low socioeconomic status served by Kings County Hospital Center should be questioned.
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