Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. Successful treatment of ARDS and severe pulmonary hypertension in a child with bordetella pertussis infection.

    infection with bordetella pertussis can cause severe illness with neurological and pulmonary complications in children. Pulmonary hypertension is an early sign of potentially fatal disease and can cause failure of conventional respiratory therapy in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a 4 1/2-year-old boy with B. pertussis infection who developed severe ARDS and pulmonary hypertension. Because of severe neurological signs the patient did not qualify for extracorporal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). After conventional ventilation, surfactant and high frequency oscillation ventilation (HFOV) failed, treatment with nitric oxide (NO) improved oxygenation, allowing recovery without the need for ECMO. The patient survived with few sequelae. Thus, this treatment may be an option in high-risk children who meet the criteria for ECMO but are excluded because of poor neurological status, as in our patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = high frequency, frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. The perinatal autopsy: a neglected source of discovery.

    The perinatal autopsy is frequently viewed by pathologists as being scientifically unrewarding and contributing little to patient care. To emphasize its importance in patient management, genetic counselling and specific research, a ten-year review (1979-88) was made of the perinatal autopsy experience at Loyola University Medical Center. The 657 deaths included late fetal deaths (22%), early neonatal deaths (51%), late neonatal deaths (10%) and deaths between 29 days and one year (17%). Comparison of the principal causes of death in various groups categorized by birth weight and age revealed significant trends. There has been a steady decline in mortality from immediate complications of immaturity, while the mortality rate from long-term complications of immaturity has not increased. There were increased frequencies of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and cardiac malformations, while the frequency of renal malformations decreased; the etiological significance of these changes requires further evaluation. A correlation of clinical observations with post-mortem findings indicates that newer diagnostic procedures, such as ultrasound, echocardiography and cardiac catheterization, are of limited value for accurate diagnosis of complex anomalies, cystic renal disease and chromosomal anomalies. A substudy included cases up to 18 years of age. The frequency of childhood neoplasia was low (17 cases), and among these cases there was a predominance of haematological malignancies (11 cases). Even with these small numbers, a shift in cause of death from disseminated malignancy to overwhelming infection was apparent. This paper includes the essential elements of a protocol for perinatal autopsies, with illustrations of specific applications. The perinatal autopsy is clearly an undervalued source of information and discovery. Little or no information is available from developing countries, where autopsies could provide information on causes of paediatric mortality and permit recognition of disease patterns, which is so critical to the planning of health services.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.014305690088402
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. Neonatal theophylline neurotoxicity.

    Despite the frequency with which theophylline is administered to premature infants, there are few reported cases of neurotoxicity. We describe a theophylline-treated premature infant with chronic bronchopulmonary dysplasia and hepatitis who displayed a focal seizure and irritability followed by other systemic signs of theophylline intoxication, at a postnatal age of 5 months. An unrecognized accidental drug overdose combined with a prolonged elimination half-life were responsible for clinical intoxication. The potential mechanisms of theophylline's neurotoxicity are discussed briefly.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.007152845044201
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. Ciliary defects associated with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Ciliary motility and ultrastructure.

    We have on several occasions studied the nasal respiratory epithelium of an infant with hyaline membrane disease that evolved into bronchopulmonary dysplasia and observed an association between the clinical status and naso-ciliary motion and ultrastructure. At 4 months of age, when the patient had significant respiratory disease, few cilia were present and they beat with a slow dyskinetic motion. The specimens contained primarily necrotic and squamous epithelial membranes; the occasional cilia present had swollen or ruptured membranes. Partial recovery of the epithelium was noted at 4.5 months, with 45% of the cilia having normal ultrastructure. The beat frequency was 15.2 /- 1.5 Hz (mean /- SD), and although some degree of dyskinesia was evident, primarily normal ciliary motion was observed. By 10 months of age, significant clinical improvement had occurred and the nasal epithelium had regenerated; 96% of the cilia had normal ultrastructure, and the ciliary beat frequency (12.4 /- 1.2 Hz) and motion were normal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.014305690088402
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. Treatment of respiratory failure in an infant with bronchopulmonary dysplasia infected with respiratory syncytial virus using inhaled nitric oxide and high frequency ventilation.

    A 2-month-old, former 28-week premature infant with bronchopulmonary dysplasia infected with respiratory syncytial virus was treated with nitric oxide and high frequency oscillatory ventilation after conventional therapy failed. nitric oxide and high frequency oscillatory ventilation rapidly improved oxygenation allowing recovery without the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This treatment regimen should be considered as an option in high-risk infants with respiratory syncytial virus infection who meet extracorporeal membrane oxygenation criteria.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5.0071528450442
keywords = high frequency, frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Relief of protracted hypercarbia by high-frequency oscillatory ventilator in a young infant with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Conventional ventilators have their limitations in management of certain conditions such as protracted hypercarbia in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Although high-frequency ventilators (HFV) may be less effective in patients with lung diseases complicated by high airway resistance, such as BPD, high-frequency oscillatory ventilators (HFOV) can still provide an alternative treatment of choice due to its property of active exhalation, in addition to its tidal volume being less than dead space and its minute ventilation being more dependent on tidal volume. This report describes 3 episodes of successful relief of protracted hypercarbia in a young infant with BPD using HFOV after failure of conventional ventilatory therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.042917070265206
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. Treatment of respiratory failure with inhaled nitric oxide and high- frequency ventilation in an infant with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    In a 7-month-old infant with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pneumonia, we have shown an additive effect of high-frequency ventilation (HFV) and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in terms of improved oxygenation and the avoidance of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Apparently, the combined therapy of HFV and iNO is superior to either therapeutic modality alone in the treatment of hypoxemic respiratory failure due to RSV pneumonia. The mechanism of increased lung expansion and alveolar recruitment appears to be responsible for a favorable clinical outcome. We conclude that the combined therapy of HFV and iNO should be considered in hypoxemic respiratory failure in pediatric patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.035764225221005
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.