Cases reported "Bundle-Branch Block"

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1/64. Left bundle branch block in infants with dilated cardiomyopathy conveys a poor prognosis.

    We describe three infants <3 months of age seen consecutively with dilated cardiomyopathy who presented initially with left bundle branch block on the surface 12-lead electrocardiogram. Each infant subsequently had a poor outcome: two died and one required heart transplantation. These results suggest that the presence of left bundle branch block on the 12-lead electrocardiogram conveys a poor prognosis in infants with dilated cardiomyopathy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cardiomyopathy
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2/64. Asymptomatic form of brugada syndrome.

    We describe a patient with the asymptomatic form of brugada syndrome. His electrographical, electropharmacological, and electrophysiological characteristics were similar to those reported in patients with the symptomatic form of brugada syndrome. We believe that he has the same arrhythmogenic substrate as that of patients with brugada syndrome. The fact that he had no episode of spontaneous ventricular fibrillation might be explained by his absence of the triggering factors.
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ranking = 35.782496185597
keywords = arrhythmogenic
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3/64. Right ventricular cardiomyopathy showing right bundle branch block and right precordial ST segment elevation.

    A 73-year-old man who had a family history of sudden death, experienced syncope. His electrocardiogram (ECG) presented right bundle branch block and right precordial ST segment elevation which are findings identical with those in brugada syndrome. The cardiac MRI showed right ventricular mild dilatation, and endomyocardial biopsy revealed fatty replacement of myocardial fibers. Though no ventricular tachyarrhythmias were induced during an electrophysiologic test, the effects on ECG of antiarrhythmic agents and autonomic modulations were similar to those in brugada syndrome. This case may suggest the relationship between brugada syndrome and right ventricular cardiomyopathy.
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ranking = 33.474607899836
keywords = right ventricular cardiomyopathy, ventricular cardiomyopathy, cardiomyopathy
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4/64. Spontaneous sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after administration of ajmaline in a patient with brugada syndrome.

    We present the case of a 13-year-old boy with an episode of aborted sudden death, absence of structural heart disease, and a characteristic ECG pattern of right bundle branch block with persistent ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads, in whom a monomorphic sustained ventricular tachycardia developed spontaneously after the administration of ajmaline. This effect may be related to an increased inhomogeneity of repolarization mediated by the drug and demonstrates the arrhythmogenic potential of Class I antiarrhythmic drugs in patients with brugada syndrome.
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ranking = 35.782496185597
keywords = arrhythmogenic
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5/64. New onset left bundle branch block with right axis deviation in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis.

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is usually associated with a normal axis or left axis deviation (LAD). When it is seen in association with right axis deviation (RAD) it is felt to be a marker of diffuse advanced myocardial disease. We report a case of new onset LBBB with RAD in a patient with Wegener's granulomatosis who had an otherwise functionally and structurally normal heart. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of LBBB with RAD without severe cardiomyopathy, as well as the first case report of new onset LBBB as a result of Wegener's granulomatosis.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = cardiomyopathy
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6/64. arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. An illustrated review highlighting developments in the diagnosis and management of this potentially fatal condition.

    arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia is an inherited, progressive condition. Characterised by fatty infiltration of the right ventricle, it frequently results in life threatening cardiac arrhythmias, and is one of the important causes of sudden cardiac death in the young. There are characteristic electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features that all physicians need to be aware of if we are to reduce these occurrences of premature death. diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging is discussed along with current treatment options.
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ranking = 998.49473968589
keywords = ventricular dysplasia, right ventricular dysplasia, dysplasia
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7/64. Intravenous administration of class I antiarrhythmic drugs induced T wave alternans in a patient with brugada syndrome.

    A 71-year-old man who experienced aborted sudden death was referred to our hospital. coronary artery disease and cerebral accident were ruled out by conventional tests. The 12-lead ECG obtained at rest showed a right bundle branch block pattern and ST segment elevation in leads V1 to V3. Double ventricular extrastimuli at coupling intervals >180 msec induced ventricular fibrillation (VF) twice during electrophysiologic study. Intravenous administration of procainamide accentuated ST segment elevation in leads V1 to V3, and visible T wave alternans was induced in leads V2 and V3 at a dose of 450 mg. Initiation of T wave alternans was not associated with changes of the cardiac cycle or development of premature beats. When procainamide infusion was discontinued, T wave alternans disappeared before the elevated ST segment returned to the control level. Pilsicainide also accentuated ST segment elevation and induced similar T wave alternans in leads V2 and V3. Class I antiarrhythmic drug-related T wave alternans has been reported rarely in brugada syndrome, but it may represent enhanced arrhythmogenicity of VF. We need to monitor closely and study the clinical implications of T wave alternans in brugada syndrome.
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ranking = 35.782496185597
keywords = arrhythmogenic
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8/64. Twenty-seven-year follow-up of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia.

    This case report describes clinical features, especially of surface ECG changes, observed for 27 years in a patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD). The course of this patient was characterized by progressive deterioration of right ventricular function and progression of delayed potentials (so-called epsilon waves) following QRS complexes. However, the relation between ventricular arrhythmias and ECG changes or the degree of right ventricular abnormality was difficult to discern.
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ranking = 1430.4243699079
keywords = ventricular dysplasia, right ventricular dysplasia, arrhythmogenic, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, arrhythmogenic right, dysplasia
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9/64. Myocardial perfusion and metabolic changes induced by biventricular pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy and left bundle branch block: description of a case evaluated by positron emission tomography.

    The effects of biventricular pacing on myocardial wall function are well known, but, at the moment, its real effects on myocardial metabolism are unclear. In patients affected by left bundle branch block, at positron emission tomography a septal defect of the uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was referred. There were no alterations in myocardial perfusion, suggesting possible metabolic damage. In this paper we report the case of a patient affected by dilated cardiomyopathy and left bundle branch block treated with a biventricular device. Biventricular pacing resolved both the wall motion alterations as well as the defect in FDG uptake present in the septal area. On the contrary, during biventricular pacing there were no modifications in myocardial perfusion as compared to basal evaluation.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = cardiomyopathy
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10/64. An aviator with cardiomyopathy and genetic susceptibility to hereditary hemochromatosis: a case report.

    A 44-yr-old male pilot was diagnosed with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, possibly as a complication of hereditary hemochromatosis, 8 yr after an acquired left bundle branch block was discovered on a routine ECG. Biochemical testing returned high levels of iron and percentage transferrin saturation, and genetic testing for hemochromatosis was remarkable for a heterozygous H63D mutation in the HFE gene on chromosome 6. Hereditary hemochromatosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis when a patient presents with cardiomyopathy and genetic testing for HFE gene variants influencing iron overload is now available as a clinical adjunct for diagnosis and patient management issues. Cardiomyopathy and symptomatic hemochromatosis are aeromedically disqualifying conditions in the U.S. air Force; however, early identification of hereditary hemochromatosis susceptibility with biochemical or genetic diagnostic tests, followed by education in primary and secondary prevention, will prevent a significant proportion of the possible sequelae.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cardiomyopathy
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