Cases reported "Bundle-Branch Block"

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1/133. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of coexistent atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia and left ventricular tachycardia originating in the left anterior fascicle.

    Coexistence of supraventricular tachycardia and ventricular tachycardia is rare. A patient with no structural heart disease and wide QRS complex tachycardia with a right bundle block configuration and right-axis deviation underwent electrophysiological examination. A concealed left atrioventricular pathway (AP) was found, and atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia (AVRT) and left ventricular tachycardia (VT) originating in or close to the anterior fascicle of the left ventricle were both induced. Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation of the concealed left AP was successfully performed. Ten months later, VT recurred and was successfully ablated using a local Purkinje potential as a guide. Coexistent AVRT and idiopathic VT originating from within or near the left anterior fascicle were successfully ablated.
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2/133. Left posterior fascicular tachycardia: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    A wide QRS complex tachycardia with right bundle-branch block morphology and left axis deviation observed in a young patient without structural heart disease may pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The surface ECG may provide several diagnostic clues to make a correct diagnosis of left posterior fascicular tachycardia and may help to differentiate it from both a supraventricular tachycardia with aberrant conduction and a typical ventricular tachycardia related to coronary artery disease. Although this tachycardia is sensitive to verapamil, this medication may probably cause transient infertility in males. The presence of a Purkinje potential preceding the QRS complex during tachycardia and optimal pace mapping may guide radio-frequency ablation resulting in a definite cure.
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3/133. A new ECG sign of an accessory pathway in sinus rhythm: pseudo partial right bundle branch block.

    It is clinically important to be able to detect the presence of an accessory pathway, as pre-excited atrial fibrillation is a well recognised cause of sudden cardiac death, for which there is a potential "cure" in the form of radiofrequency ablation of the pathway. The classic manifestations such as a shortened PR interval or delta waves may not always be present. In certain patients a pseudo partial right bundle block pattern-that is, an rSr' complex in lead V1- may be the sole manifestation of a left sided accessory pathway. An electrophysiological mechanism is proposed for this pattern and it is suggested that this pattern may be used as a new ECG sign for diagnosing an accessory pathway in sinus rhythm.
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4/133. Radiofrequency ablation of a right atriofascicular Mahaim fiber and two contralateral left free-wall accessory pathways.

    We report a rare combination of a right atriofascicular Mahaim fiber and two left-sided atrioventricular accessory pathways in a 57-year-old female presenting with an antidromic atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia. Radiofrequency ablation was first targeted at the left lateral accessory pathway that served as the retrograde limb of the tachycardia. After elimination of the left lateral pathway, a bystander left posterolateral pathway was detected, and it too was successfully ablated. Although no tachycardia was reinducible, the Mahaim pathway was ablated because of its short effective refractory period. A discrete Mahaim potential recorded at the right atrial free-wall successfully guided the ablation.
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5/133. Electrocardiographic manifestations: patterns that confound the EKG diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction-left bundle branch block, ventricular paced rhythm, and left ventricular hypertrophy.

    The 12-lead electrocardiogram (EKG), a powerful tool used in evaluating the chest pain patient, has its shortcomings. One such failing is encountered in a patient with one of the following electrocardiographic patterns: left bundle branch block (LBBB), ventricular paced rhythm (VPR), and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). These patterns reduce the ability of the EKG to detect acute coronary ischemic change and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Several strategies are available to assist in the correct interpretation of these complicated electrocardiographic patterns, including a knowledge of the ST segment-T wave changes associated with these confounding patterns, performance of serial EKGs, and comparison with previous EKGs if available. This article suggests guidelines and interpretive tools for diagnosing AMI on EKG in patients with these confounding patterns.
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6/133. Simultaneous alterations of QRS configuration and tachycardia cycle length during radiofrequency ablation of idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia.

    Idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia is characterized by a QRS morphology of right bundle branch block pattern and left axis deviation. Alterations in the QRS configuration and tachycardia cycle length, as well as shifting of the earliest activation site occurred after eliminating the original tachycardia by radiofrequency current in an 18-year-old man with idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia. Activation mapping and entrainment mapping during tachycardia identified 2 putative tachycardia exits, 15 mm apart. Elimination of both tachycardias was accomplished after applying radiofrequency current to each exit separately. We proposed that the first radiofrequency application might have altered the exit site and the zone of slow conduction adjacent to the exit site, such that the ventricular tachycardia had a different QRS morphology and became slower in this patient.
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7/133. Right and left bundle branch block in acute inferior myocardial infarction.

    An 88-year-old man presented with acute Q wave inferior, posterior and right ventricular myocardial infarction which was associated with intermittent complete right and left bundle branch block.
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8/133. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of upper septal idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia exhibiting left bundle branch block morphology.

    Idiopathic left ventricular (LV) tachycardia usually exhibits right bundle branch block morphology. There are only a few sporadic cases that exhibit left bundle branch block (LBBB) morphology. We report a patient whose QRS complex during ventricular tachycardia (VT) was relatively narrow (100 msec) and exhibited LBBB (precordial R wave transition between V3 and V4) and a normal frontal plane axis. This VT was ablated successfully by radiofrequency current applied to the LV upper septum, where the earliest endocardial activation was recorded.
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9/133. Electrophysiologic characteristics and radiofrequency ablation of concealed nodofascicular and left anterograde atriofascicular pathways.

    INTRODUCTION: True nodoventricular or nodofascicular pathways and left-sided anterograde decremental accessory pathways (APs) are considered rare findings. methods AND RESULTS: Two unusual patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia were referred for radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Both patients had evidence of dual AV nodal conduction. In case 1, programmed atrial and ventricular stimulation induced regular tachycardia with a narrow QRS complex or episodes of right and left bundle branch block not altering the tachycardia cycle length and long concentric ventriculoatrial (VA) conduction. Ventricular extrastimuli elicited during His-bundle refractoriness resulted in tachycardia termination. During the tachycardia, both the ventricles and the distal right bundle were not part of the reentrant circuit. These findings were consistent with a concealed nodofascicular pathway. RF ablation in the right atrial mid-septal region with the earliest atrial activation preceded by a possible AP potential resulted in tachycardia termination and elimination of VA conduction. In case 2, antidromic reciprocating tachycardia of a right bundle branch block pattern was considered to involve an anterograde left posteroseptal atriofascicular pathway. For this pathway, decremental conduction properties as typically observed for right atriofascicular pathways could be demonstrated. During atrial stimulation and tachycardia, a discrete AP potential was recorded at the atrial and ventricular insertion sites and along the AP. Mechanical conduction block of the AP was reproducibly induced at the annular level and at the distal insertion site. Successful RF ablation was performed at the mitral annulus. CONCLUSION: This report describes two unusual cases consistent with concealed nodofascicular and left anterograde atriofascicular pathways, which were ablated successfully without impairing normal AV conduction system.
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10/133. brugada syndrome characterized by the appearance of J waves.

    We describe a patient with brugada syndrome. The ST-segment elevation in precordial leads was revealed during admission, but the appearance of J waves was characteristic before ventricular fibrillation (VF), rather than ST-segment elevation. J waves have been reported to be associated with the presence of an Ito-mediated prominent action potential notch in the epicardium. It is considered that one of the mechanisms of this VF is due to heterogeneous distribution of the refractory period according to changes in K channels including Ito.
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