Cases reported "Burns, Chemical"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/111. Full-thickness burn to the hand from an automobile airbag.

    An 18-year-old male was involved in a single car motor vehicle accident in which the driver's side airbag was deployed. He presented to the trauma center with complex injuries to the left hand, lacerations to the scalp, and a full-thickness burn to the ulnar aspect of the right hand that included the hypothenar area and the fifth digit. The patient was admitted to the trauma center and received immediate consultation from the burn service. He underwent debridement and split-thickness skin grafting of 50 cm2 of the right hand on postburn day 3. The graft became necrotic and the patient underwent debridement of the skin and the abductor minimi muscle of the right hand on postburn day 32. Split-thickness skin grafting and release of flexion contracture were successfully completed 18 days later. The police and fire departments reported that the airbag showed signs of thermal destruction. Upon request, Honda motors submitted information from the TRW safety systems and material safety data sheet (Mesa, Ariz, issued 1989) that showed that airbag canisters contain the chemicals sodium azide and cupric oxide. water may react with sodium azide to form highly toxic and explosive hyfrazoic acid. These chemicals are converted to sodium hydroxide, which can cause significant chemical burns. In addition, these chemicals may ignite when exposed to live electrical wires or temperatures greater than 300 degrees F. We conclude that burns associated with damaged deployed airbags in motor vehicle accidents may be the results of both chemical and thermal injury. The extent of the burn wound may be underestimated, as our case illustrates. Full-thickness burns resulting from airbag deployment may require more aggressive initial debridement and treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/111. hydrofluoric acid burns of the lower extremity.

    Chemical burns to the lower extremity can be disabling and of serious consequence if not managed properly. The severity and rapid onset of the burns caused by hydrofluoric acid after initial contact make this a highly dangerous substance. The potential severity of injury and the following complications make it a chemical of which all physicians should have a basic understanding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/111. Pancreaticocolonic fistula after extensive corrosive injury from esophagus to jejunum.

    We report a case of extensive corrosive injury to the jejunum after ingestion of about 200 ml of hydrochloric acid as an attempted suicide. Subtotal esophagectomy, total gastroduodenectomy, segmental resection of the jejunum and partial pancreatectomy were performed in the first two operations. Forty-five days after surgery, the patient was well and discharged. Six months later, the patient underwent esophageal reconstruction surgery. During surgery, a pancreaticocolonic fistula between the head of the pancreas and the transverse colon was found. The esophageal reconstruction using the transverse colon was performed via the retrosternal route.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1057.3138288521
keywords = hydrochloric acid, acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/111. Chemical burn caused by topical vinegar application in a newborn infant.

    Although there is increasing interest in "alternative medicine," including nontraditional and homeopathic remedies, all around the world, they are not always safe and beneficial and may have adverse effects. We report a chemical burn caused by vinegar applied topically to lower body temperature in a febrile newborn and discuss briefly chemical skin burns caused by organic acids.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/111. Chromic acid burns: early aggressive excision is the best method to prevent systemic toxicity.

    chromium poisoning can occur from the cutaneous absorption of chromium from burns that are as small as 1% of the total body surface area. In this case report, we describe a patient with 10% total body surface area burns caused by hot chromic acid. The amount of chromium removed by peritoneal dialysis and the amount of chromium in the urine were estimated, as well as the chromium content in the excised skin, serum, and red blood cells. The extent of chromium load from this type of injury and subsequent risk of systemic poisoning is not predictable, and we therefore believe that systemic toxicity is best prevented by early excision of the burned skin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/111. Successful treatments of lung injury and skin burn due to hydrofluoric acid exposure.

    Recent growth in the electronics and chemical industries has brought about a progressive increase in the use of hydrofluoric acid (HF), along with the concomitant risk of acute poisoning among HF workers. We report severe cases of inhalation exposure and skin injury which were successfully treated by administering a 5% calcium gluconate solution with a nebulizer and applying 2.5% calcium gluconate jelly, respectively. Case 1: A 52-year old worker used HF for surface treatment after welding stainless steel, and was hospitalized with rapid onset of severe dyspnea. On admission to the critical care medical center he had widespread wheezing and crackles in his lungs. Chest radiograph showed a fine diffuse veiling over both lower pulmonary fields. Severe hypocalcemia with high concentrations of F in serum and urine were disclosed. He was immediately given 5% calcium gluconate solution by intermittent positive-pressure breathing (IPPB), utilizing a nebulizer. On the 21st hospital day, chest film and CT scan did not demonstrate any abnormality. He was discharged very much improved on the 22nd hospital day. Case 2: A 35-year old worker at an electronics factory was admitted to his local hospital with severe skin burn on his face and neck after exposure to 100% HF. Treatment began with immediate copious washing with water for 20 min. calcium gluconate 2.5% gel (HF burn jelly) was applied to the area as a first-aid measure. Persistent high concentrations of serum and urinary F were disclosed for 2 weeks. After treatment with applications of HF burn jelly, he was confirmed as being completely recovered. The present cases and a review of published data suggest that an adequate method of emergency treatment for accidental HF poisoning is necessary.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/111. Corrosive injuries of the esophagus in newborns.

    To evaluate the morbidity and mortality of corrosive esophageal injuries (CEI) in the neonatal period, the records of 184 children hospitalized following caustic ingestion over a 10-year period from January 1987 to November 1997 were reviewed. Eight (4.3%) were newborns (5 boys and 3 girls). The mean age of the newborns was 12 days (range 1-28). The ingested caustic materials were benzalkonium chloride in six patients and trichloroacetic acid in two. Oropharyngeal examination and esophagoscopy were performed for diagnosis. hyperemia and fibrin plaques were present in the oropharynx in all patients. The management consisted of endotracheal intubation, antibiotics, corticosteroids, and total parenteral nutrition. pneumonia and sepsis developed in three patients and one died of sepsis. Stenosis developed in two patients, who were treated three times with antegrade dilatations. The morbidity was 62.5% (five patients) and the mortality was 12.5% (one) in newborns with CEI. These results indicate that ingestion of a caustic substance results in high morbidity and mortality in newborns. parents and nurses should be warned about this risk.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/111. Efficacy of hemodiafiltration in a child with severe lactic acidosis due to thiamine deficiency.

    We report the case of a child in whom severe lactic acidosis (LA) and hyperammonemia developed after twenty days of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for diffuse esophageal damage due to caustic ingestion. The revision of TPN preparation revealed that thiamine was never included and the hypothesis of thiamine deficiency was later confirmed measuring the serum thiamine level. Because severe metabolic acidosis the dialytic treatment with hemodiafiltration (HDF) and bicarbonate infusion were performed: the patient very quickly recovered with dramatic reestablishment of the acid-basic balance. Thiamine administration restored lactate metabolism. We emphasize that HDF is a useful and prompt treatment for LA to get over the critical phase of neurological and cardiological damage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/111. Cholinsalicylate gel induced oral lesion: report of case.

    salicylic acid and its derivatives are extensively used medications for the treatment of systemic and local diseases. However, injudicious use of aspirin as well as other derivatives of salicylic acid, may cause systemic and oral complications such as mucosal burns and oral ulcers. In children, topical administration of these drugs, even in small dosages, may cause adverse reactions. This report shows a case of an 8 year old boy with G6PD deficiency, who had a mucosal burn caused by application of a cholinsalicylate paste. Three days later, the child developed oral ulcers, malaise and fever. The present case is characteristic of the enigmatic nature of the etiology and diagnosis of oral lesions, and the possible connection between cholinsalicylate systemic absorption and hemolytic anemia is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/111. Corrosive injury-induced gastric outlet obstruction: a changing spectrum of agents and treatment.

    methods: During the last 5 years, 61 children were admitted to the authors' hospital because of corrosive substance ingestion, and among them 6 patients were seen with gastric outlet obstruction. Two of them had ingested acid substances, and the other 4 had ingested alkali corrosives. The mean age was 2.9 years (range, 1.5 to 3). Their common complaint was postprandial vomiting, which had begun 3 weeks after the event (range, 1 week to 10 weeks). Endoscopic evaluation and barium contrast radiographies were performed at admission. Four patients had a pyloric stricture, 1 had an antral stricture, and another had an antropyloric stricture. Balloon dilatation of the pylorus (in 1 patient), pyloroplasty (in 3 patients), and Billroth I procedures (in 2 patients) were performed. The mean follow-up period was 22 months (range, 6 weeks to 48 months). One patient, who had undergone a Billroth I procedure, underwent reoperation because of intestinal obstruction 3 months later. On follow-up they are all free of symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment of gastric outlet obstruction caused by corrosive ingestion should be treated surgically. Although endoscopic and radiologic evaluation helps to determine the time and necessity, once the diagnosis is confirmed, early definitive surgical intervention should be performed, and the type of the surgery depends mostly on the findings of the surgeon at laparotomy. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of the pylorus maybe attempted in suitable cases. Special care should be given to prevent children from accidental corrosive ingestion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = acid
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Burns, Chemical'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.