Cases reported "Bursitis"

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1/31. Multiple rheumatoid bursitis with migrating chylous cysts. Report of a case in a European woman and review of the literature.

    We report a case of recurrent multiple bursitis (19 episodes at nine sites) requiring seven surgical procedures in a European women with a 38-year history of severe, nodular, destructive seropositive rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to second-line drugs. The episodes of bursitis were not correlated with activity of the joint disease. Some cysts migrated over a considerable distance. At least two cysts contained chylous fluid. The histologic study of one cyst demonstrated a cholesterol crystal granuloma. Potential relationships linking cholesterol crystals, chylous cysts, and migrating multiple bursitis are discussed. The relevant literature is reviewed.
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keywords = arthritis
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2/31. Inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendonitis in psoriatic arthritis demonstrated by ultrasonography.

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the use of high resolution ultrasound measurements and power Doppler mode in the diagnosis and follow up of a patient with psoriatic arthritic with retrocalcaneal bursitis and Achilles tendonitis. methods: An outpatient based ATL HDI 3000 ultrasound equipment was used with a CL10-5 MHZ 26 mm probe and musculoskeletal software. Real time B mode and power Doppler mode were used to detect changes in structure and blood flow. RESULTS: Unilateral retrocalcaneal bursitis and Achilles tendonitis were demonstrated by sonography. Power Doppler mode was useful to demonstrate an increased blood flow around an abnormal retrocalcaneal bursa. A follow up examination showed marginal thickening of the achilles tendon without any bursitis. CONCLUSIONS: ultrasonography is an objective method in the confirmation of clinical diagnosis after physical examination. During the examination it is possible to gain not only qualitative but also quantitative data. A comparative study with quantitative data is possible in longitudinal studies.
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ranking = 4
keywords = arthritis
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3/31. Giant iliopsoas bursitis: sonographic findings with magnetic resonance correlations.

    We present the case of a 40-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis who had a painless left inguinal mass. Sonographic examination revealed a large soft tissue mass with mixed internal echotexture and regular borders extending inside the pelvis and into the proximal portion of the thigh. Sonography also showed communication between the bursa of the iliopsoas muscle and the hip cavity, with intra-articular synovitis and erosion of the ileum. Giant iliopsoas bursitis secondary to hip involvement in rheumatoid arthritis was diagnosed on the basis of the sonographic findings. This diagnosis was confirmed by MRI.
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ranking = 2
keywords = arthritis
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4/31. Successful treatment of multiple bursal cysts in systemic sclerosis.

    BACKGROUND: bursitis frequently occurs in the various conditions of autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, but there have been few cases of effusive bursitis in systemic sclerosis. OBJECTIVE: To present a case of systemic sclerosis with multiple bursitis on upper, lower extremities, and trunk with or without joint involvement. methods: Case report and review of the literature. RESULTS: Multiple asymptomatic cystic masses contained yellow and chalky sterile fluid, all of which were diagnosed as effusive bursitis. Most of them were treated with a surgical resection, a continuous drainage, and an injection of highly concentrated ethanol into their internal spaces. However, an intrabursal injection of emulsified triamcinolone acetonide was the only effective treatment for the giant mass that occurred on the right chest wall. CONCLUSION: Successful treatment of multiple bursal cysts with systemic sclerosis was presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = arthritis
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5/31. candida arthritis. A manifestation of disseminated candidiasis.

    Fungal infections infrequently involve the joints. review of the literature reveals that candida arthritis is rare, that it is usually a complication of disseminated candidiasis and that it occurs as a primary joint infection without spread from adjacent osteomyelitis. In the patient we describe candida arthritis and bursitis of separate joints developed as a late manifestation of disseminated infection following "transient" C. tropicalis fungemia. Treatment consisting of aspiration and parenteral amphotericin b eradicated the joint infection without the need for surgery. Bursectomy, however, was required to eradicate the bursal infection. awareness of this as well as other late complications of candidemia which signify disseminated infection is important. Optimal therapy will be determined only by further clinical experience with this unusual manifestation of candida infection.
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ranking = 6
keywords = arthritis
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6/31. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.
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ranking = 5
keywords = arthritis
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7/31. Osteoarticular complications of erysipelas.

    BACKGROUND: Rare osteoarticular complications occurring after erysipelas have been reported. We describe 9 patients in whom various osteoarticular complications developed during erysipelas. OBJECTIVE: We sought to analyze osteoarticular complications during erysipelas, paying special attention to clinical, bacteriologic, and radiologic data. methods: Data were retrospectively recorded from the files of patients seen in 3 dermatologic centers between 1998 and 2000. They included laboratory tests, bacteriologic cultures, radiologic investigations, and treatment modalities and outcome of both erysipelas and osteoarticular complications. RESULTS: We observed 9 patients (7 men and 2 women; mean age 49.6 years) who first presented with typical erysipelas of the lower limb and then osteoarticular complications developed during the course of their disease, always localized to a joint contiguous to the erysipelas plaque. These complications included: relatively benign complications, ie, bursitis (n = 5) or algodystrophy (n = 1), occurring after erysipelas with favorable course; and more severe complications, ie, osteitis (n = 1), arthritis (n = 1), and septic tendinitis (n = 1), occurring after erysipelas characterized by local cutaneous complications (abscess, necrosis). CONCLUSIONS: Osteoarticular complications of erysipelas can be divided into the 2 groups of nonseptic complications (mainly bursitis), which are characterized by a favorable outcome, and septic complications (osteitis, arthritis, tendinitis), which require specific, often prolonged treatment and, sometimes, operation. Their diagnosis is on the basis of clinical and radiologic findings rather than joint aspirations, which are usually not possible through infected skin tissue.
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ranking = 2
keywords = arthritis
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8/31. Idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder in two first-degree relatives.

    INTRODUCTION: Primary hypoparathyroidism and adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder in the same patient does not seem to have been reported previously. We report two cases in first-degree relatives. patients: Case 1: In 1999, a 41-year-old woman experienced seizures simulating epilepsy. She had been treated 5 years earlier for idiopathic adhesive capsulitis of both shoulders. Computed tomography of the brain showed calcifications in the basal ganglia meeting criteria for Fahr's disease, and incipient bilateral cataract was found. A diagnosis of idiopathic primary hypoparathyroidism was given. After 1 month of calcium and vitamin d supplementation, improvements were noted in the clinical symptoms, laboratory test, and electroencephalogram. Case 2: The 70-year-old father of case 1, who had an unremarkable medical history, had been receiving treatment for about 2 years for adhesive capsulitis of the left shoulder. Routine laboratory tests disclosed idiopathic primary hypoparathyroidism. The outcome was favorable with calcium and vitamin d supplementation. CONCLUSION: Our cases suggest that there may be a common immunological or genetic basis for primary hypoparathyroidism and adhesive capsulitis. Alternatively, adhesive capsulitis may be a manifestation of hypoparathyroidism. Although genetic factors involved in primary hypoparathyroidism have been elucidated, the pathophysiology of the disease remains unclear. Finally, a chance association remains possible.
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ranking = 0.0022033768191261
keywords = idiopathic
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9/31. Bilateral giant iliopsoas bursitis presenting as refractory edema of lower limbs.

    A 69-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis presented with bilateral leg swelling. Magnetic resonance studies revealed bilateral giant iliopsoas bursitis with intrapelvic expansion and compression of pelvic vessels and bladder. The case was refractory to intensive systemic and local medical treatment.
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keywords = arthritis
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10/31. Extension of lumbar spine infection into osteoarthritic hip through psoas abscess.

    We present a case of pyogenic lumbar discitis and septic hip arthritis, accompanied by a psoas abscess and pyogenic iliopsoas bursitis, for which the correct diagnosis was delayed. The patho-mechanism was speculated to be initial hematogenous infection in the lumbar spine that spread along the psoas muscle as a psoas abscess and then extended into the hip joint via the iliopsoas bursa. For an early correct diagnosis, clinicians should be aware that the lumbar spine and hip joint regions communicate through the psoas muscle space and iliopsoas bursa, making it possible for infection to spread.
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keywords = arthritis
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