Cases reported "Bursitis"

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1/7. Adhesive capsulitis of the glenohumeral joint with an unusual neuropathic presentation: a case report.

    A 37-yr-old woman presented with a 7-mo history of unilateral shoulder girdle stiffness, pain, and weakness and had already been diagnosed with frozen shoulder. physical examination revealed scapular winging and suspicious focal paralysis of shoulder girdle muscles. Subsequently, electrodiagnostic studies reported denervation of deltoid, infraspinatus, serratus anterior, and lower cervical paraspinal muscles, in addition to a prolonged long thoracic nerve latency. The history, physical examination, and cervical magnetic resonance imaging scan seemed most consistent with neuralgic amyotrophy, although the electrodiagnostic examination could be interpreted as cervical radiculopathy. Some of the difficulties in identifying neuralgic amyotrophy and distinguishing it from cervical radiculopathy are discussed herein. Historically, frozen shoulder has seemed to develop as a complication of the neuropathic process. Both neuralgic amyotrophy and frozen shoulder have a poorly understood pathogenesis, and their combined presence is presumed to be rare. Because of difficulties inherent in the physical examination of frozen shoulder, a coexistent neuropathic process may go undetected.
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keywords = nerve
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2/7. Physical therapy for spinal accessory nerve injury complicated by adhesive capsulitis.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The authors found no literature describing adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury and no exercise program or protocol for patients with spinal accessory nerve injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with adhesive capsulitis and spinal accessory nerve injury following a carotid endarterectomy. CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient was a 67-year-old woman referred for physical therapy following manipulation of the left shoulder and a diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis by her orthopedist. Spinal accessory nerve injury was identified during the initial physical therapy examination, and a program of neuromuscular electrical stimulation was initiated. OUTCOMES: The patient had almost full restoration of the involved muscle function after 5 months of physical therapy. DISCUSSION: This case report illustrates the importance of accurate diagnosis and suggests physical therapy intervention to manage adhesive capsulitis as a consequence of spinal accessory nerve injury.
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keywords = nerve
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3/7. Rheumatoid iliopsoas bursitis presenting as unilateral femoral nerve palsy.

    A 65-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) developed symptomatic compression of the femoral nerve secondary to an iliopsoas bursitis. Her adjacent hip joint was not severely affected by arthritis. This entity should be included among the entrapment neuropathies complicating RA.
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ranking = 5
keywords = nerve
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4/7. Saphenous nerve entrapment caused by pes anserine bursitis mimicking stress fracture of the tibia.

    Numerous studies have addressed saphenous nerve entrapment at the level of the adductor canal. In this case, we report an entrapment syndrome located further distally occurring as part of an athletic overuse injury. Distal tibial pain, initially managed as a stress fracture, resolved when a pes anserine bursitis was treated. This was associated with return of saphenous nerve potentials along the tibia.
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ranking = 6
keywords = nerve
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5/7. Cubital bursitis.

    We describe two cases of bursitis at the insertion of the biceps tendon. They presented as swellings in the cubital fossa with symptoms of median nerve irritation. The aetiology was probably mechanical trauma; both patients were cured by operation.
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keywords = nerve
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6/7. Morton's metatarsalgia due to intermetatarsophalangeal bursitis as an early manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Of 50 patients in whom Morton's metatarsalgia was diagnosed during an 18-year period, 12 (24%) had rheumatoid arthritis at the time of presentation. After conservative management had failed, 20 patients had subtotal excision of the intermetatarsophalangeal bursa and associated digital nerve; in two patients, only the nerve was excised. During the follow-up period ranging from two months to 15 years, an additional eight patients developed sero-positive rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, a total of 20 patients (40%) presenting with Morton's metatarsalgia had rheumatoid disease at initial presentation or later developed this disease. Histological changes in the intermetatarsophalangeal bursa consistent with rheumatoid arthritis were found in ten patients. Of these, two were known already to have rheumatoid arthritis, three subsequently developed rheumatoid arthritis, and five do not yet have other evidence of the disease. The evidence suggests that Morton's metatarsalgia is associated with rheumatoid arthritis and is the basic etiology in a significant number of patients.
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ranking = 2
keywords = nerve
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7/7. Considerations about a unique clinical pattern: flexion block of the shoulder.

    Frozen shoulder is a well-defined nosologic entity characterized by retraction of the anterior portion of the glenohumeral joint capsule. When clinical findings are inconclusive, arthrography can differentiate a frozen shoulder from a stiff and painful shoulder. We report three cases of stiffness of the shoulder that we believe was due to a unique pathological process. Flexion was restricted to 120 degrees and a sensation suggestive of mechanical blockage was felt upon passive flexion. Medical rotation was restricted and painful, whereas lateral rotation with the elbow held against the torso was normal. Findings upon arthrography or magnetic resonance imaging were normal, with no evidence of capsulitis or chronic rotator cuff lesions. Our pathogenic hypotheses include a lesion of the proximal portion of the long head of the biceps brachii or a focal ligamentous lesion. Treatment should consist of specific physical therapy and, in refractory forms, gentle mobilization under general anesthesia.
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ranking = 3.8193220371692
keywords = block
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