Cases reported "CHARGE Syndrome"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/16. Severe gastrointestinal bleeding resulting in total gastrectomy in a patient with major burns--a case report.

    gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a known but rare complication of major burns. This case report describes the management of this potentially life threatening problem in a young adult with 45% body surface area burns who developed massive gastrointestinal-tract bleeding. The patient required a total gastrectomy that was complicated by a burst abdomen. Despite undergoing a series of major insults. the patient survived and was eventually discharged from hospital with an acceptable level of morbidity. The problems faced by the burn centre team and the issues involved in the decision making process are discussed in the management of this unusually devastating complication.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/16. Epiploic appendagitis: adding to the differential of acute abdominal pain.

    We report a patient with epiploic appendagitis who presented with acute abdominal pain. Emergency Department and discharge courses are described. The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disorder are discussed. knowledge of this uncommonly diagnosed entity and its usual benign course may allow the Emergency Physician to order the appropriate studies to help avoid unnecessary surgical treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/16. streptococcus pneumoniae peritonitis postpartum.

    A peritonitis caused by an ascending infection is a rare complication postpartum. A 37-year-old woman presented with a secondary peritonitis due to streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient had given birth to a healthy boy 4 weeks before and showed no symptoms of a bronchitis on admission. An operation was performed after the patient developed an acute abdomen, showing a diffuse peritonitis. High vaginal swabs and blood cultures taken on admission were positive for S. pneumoniae as well as the specimen taken during the operation. Thus we concluded that this was a case of an ascending infection. After antibiotic therapy with penicillin the patient could be discharged 8 days after the operation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/16. A new etiology of acute abdominal emergencies in cirrhotic patient: secondary pneumococcal peritonitis with jejunitis.

    We report the first case of secondary pneumococcal peritonitis associated with acute jejunitis in a 52-year-old homeless child-Pugh C cirrhotic man without ascitis. The patient was admitted with clinical signs of peritonitis, and jaundice. Morphologic examination was unremarkable. A laparotomy revealed a diffuse peritonitis, and an acute jejunitis with prenecrotic lesion. The lesion was located within the first centimeters of the jejunum, immediately after the duodeno-jejunal angle, extented on 15 cm. A resection of the first 15 cm of the jejunum was performed with duodeno-jejunal side-to-side manual anastomosis. Gram-stain and cultures of blood, peritoneal pus, and jejunal mucosa revealed a penicillin-sensitive streptococcus pneumoniae. Appropriate parenteral antibiotic treatment was initiated (aminopenicillin). The postoperative course was marked by a transient hepatic failure associated with an ascitis controlled by diuretics. The patient was discharged on the 26th day after surgery. This case reports a new etiology of acute abdominal emergencies in cirrhotic patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/16. Primary segmental infarction of the greater omentum: a rare cause of RLQ syndrome: laparoscopic resection.

    The authors report a rare case of a patient with a primary segmental infarction of the greater omentum who reported acute abdominal pain. Despite preoperative clinical studies and imaging evaluation, an etiologic diagnosis could not be determined. The diagnosis of this uncommon disease was determined after initial laparoscopic exploration. A laparoscopic resection was performed. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was discharged within 12 hours. The differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant syndrome includes several disorders, of which the primary segmental infarction of the greater omentum is not frequent. The authors emphasize the usefulness of routine laparoscopic exploration in patients with RLQ syndrome because it adds the possibility of mini-invasive treatment to the initial diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/16. Laparoscopic treatment of two patients with omental infarction mimicking acute appendicitis.

    BACKGROUND: Omental infarction is a rare entity that usually causes symptoms similar to those of appendicitis. Ultrasound or computerized tomography scan can diagnose omental infarction preoperatively. methods: We treated two patients with omental infarction by performing a laparoscopic omentectomy in each one. RESULTS: The pathology verified the operative diagnosis, and both patients were discharged home on the first postoperative day. CONCLUSION: Omental infarction can be accurately diagnosed and safely treated with laparoscopy. Key Words: laparoscopy, Omental infarction, Acute abdominal pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/16. Laparoscopic diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum. Case report.

    acute pain at the right side of the abdomen rarely is caused by idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum (ISIGO). In most cases the patient is presumed to suffer from appendicitis or cholecystitis. Although some radiologic signs might suggest ISIGO, this rare clinical entity mostly is diagnosed perioperatively and confirmed by postoperative pathologic findings. In the reported case, a patient is described with acute right-side abdominal pain of unknown origin, in whom ISIGO was encountered during diagnostic laparoscopy and successfully resected. Because of this minimally invasive approach, the patient was discharged the day after surgery and returned to work after 5 days. The pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment methods are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/16. Peritoneoscopic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheter and bowel perforation: experience of an interventional nephrology program.

    BACKGROUND: Bowel perforation is an uncommon but serious complication of peritoneoscopic peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion. The approach to diagnosis of bowel perforation utilizing this technique has not been previously published. The authors report their experience with the diagnosis and management of bowel perforation in the context of peritoneoscopic placement of PD catheters. methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 750 PD catheters inserted over a 12-year period (January 1991 to May 2003) utilizing peritoneoscopic technique. RESULTS: Six (0.8%) patients experienced bowel perforation during the procedure. The diagnosis was made immediately during the procedure in 5 (83%) of the 6 patients. Of these 5, peritoneoscopy confirmed intrabowel position of the cannula by visualizing bowel mucosa (n = 3) and hard stool (n = 1). The fifth patient showed extrusion of fecal matter upon trocar withdrawal before peritoneoscopy. All 5 had emanation of foul-smelling gas through the cannula. Bowel rest and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics were initiated. Of the 5, 1 required surgery, whereas the others were discharged home after 3 days. The sixth patient had fever, severe peritoneal irritation, and polymicrobial peritonitis the morning after the procedure. In this patient, no evidence of bowel injury was noted during the procedure except for brief emanation of foul-smelling gas. He required surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: Bowel perforation can be diagnosed immediately in most patients undergoing peritoneoscopic PD catheter insertion. A majority of these patients can be treated medically. The surgical team should be consulted if the patient shows clinical deterioration or has signs of peritoneal irritation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/16. Inguinal mass due to an external supravesical hernia and acute abdomen due to an internal supravesical hernia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Although supravesical hernias were described as early as 1804, there have been fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature. The supravesical fossa is a triangular area bounded laterally and above by median and medial umbilical ligaments, and below by the peritoneal reflection that passes from the anterior abdominal wall to the dome of the bladder. A hernia starting in this fossa usually protrudes through the abdominal wall as a direct inguinal hernia (external supravesical hernia). Less commonly, it remains within the abdomen, passing into spaces around the bladder (internal supravesical hernia). A 43-year-old mill worker presented with an enlarged painful mass in the left groin. He underwent a surgical repair of a direct inguinal hernia without addressing an unrecognized supravesicular component. Eight hours after his discharge next morning, he presented with acute abdomen, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distention. The second surgery revealed the presence of a left lateral internal supravesical hernia with incarcerated small bowel. This was also repaired, and the patient was discharged in stable condition. This report aims to review and discuss the surgical anatomy of these rare supravesical hernias and calls attention to this type of hernia as an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/16. intestinal obstruction from a forgotten artery forceps: a case report.

    A 43-year-old multiparous patient p2 0 all alive who had abdominal hysterectomy secondary to ruptured uterus 2 1/2 years prior to presentation, was seen with acute (surgical) abdomen. An artery forceps was seen on plain abdominal X-ray and subsequent laparotomy revealed gangrenous ileum. The entire length of the ileum was involved, including the ileocecal valve and part of the cecum. The patient had limited right hemicolectomy and anastomosis of the distal part of the jejunum with the proximal section of the transverse colon. The post-operative period was uneventful and she was discharged to outpatient clinic 2 weeks post operatively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = charge
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.