Cases reported "Cadaver"

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1/7. Transplantation of autologous and allogeneic bone marrow with liver from a cadaveric donor for primary liver cancer.

    BACKGROUND: In histocompatibility mismatched experimental animals, a combination of T-cell-depleted autologous and allogeneic marrow may induce mixed chimerism and tolerance. patients with large primary liver tumors have a poor outcome. We investigated whether it were possible to induce mixed chimerism and obtain an antitumor effect in a patient with a large primary liver cancer after combined liver and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). methods: A 46-year-old female with a primary non resectable liver cancer received a liver transplant from a cadaveric donor. Subsequently, she was conditioned with 4x2 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation, 120 mg/kg cyclophosphamide, and 7.5 Gy total body irradiation. Twelve days after liver transplantation, she received T-cell-depleted autologous:cadaveric 5/6 antigen HLA-mismatched marrow in a proportion of CD34 cells of 0.5:3.0x10(6)/kg. chimerism status was determined with polymerase chain reaction amplification of variable number tandem repeats from dna obtained from CD3 , CD19 , and CD45 magnetic-bead-separated cells. RESULTS: The early posttransplant period was uneventful; liver function was normal and the hematopoietic engraftment of donor and recipient origin was prompt. Alpha-fetoprotein levels dropped from 440 to 35 microg/l. One month after marrow transplantation, donor T-cells decreased markedly. Monoclonal antibody OKT-3 and 10(5)/kg donor T-cells were given. One month later, the patient developed diarrhea and abdominal pain. A colonoscopy showed moderate gastrointestinal acute graft-versus-host disease and a cryptosporidium infection. Three months after BMT, she became a complete donor chimera. chimera cells showed little, if any, reactivity in mixed lymphocyte cultures to recipient and donor cells, but reacted to third party. Five months after BMT, she developed progressive aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia and died. No tumor was found at the autopsy. CONCLUSION: We obtained mixed donor-recipient hematopoietic chimerism without severe acute graft-versus-host-disease, after combined T-cell depleted autologous and allogeneic BMT and a transplantation of a liver from an HLA-mismatched cadaveric donor. Additional donor T-cells enhanced donor bone marrow engraftment, but rejected the autograft. On the basis of this first attempt, further clinical studies are warranted.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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2/7. Diagnostic problems associated with cadaveric trauma from animal activity.

    Analysis of a series of deaths between 1986 and 2001 resulting from natural disease, accidents, suicides, and homicide, where postmortem animal activity had traumatized bodies, was undertaken at the Forensic science Center in Adelaide to demonstrate the range of lesions that may occur and problems in interpretation that result. Tissue damage had been caused by a variety of animals, including fly larvae, ants, birds, dogs, rodents, sea lice, and sharks. Postmortem animal activity had disguised injuries, modified wounds, and created the appearances of inflicted injury. Problems with identification occurred after postmortem facial trauma, and loss of organ parenchyma had interfered with, or precluded, the precise determination of the manner of death in some cases. Specific kinds of tissue and organ damage may occur after death, necessitating careful assessment of lesions in a search for characteristic features of animal activity. The pattern of lesions may enable identification of the particular species of animal involved.
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ranking = 9
keywords = animal
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3/7. Post-mortem observations of a recent radiofrequency catheter ablation site.

    The acute and chronic gross and microscopic morphologic changes present in myocardium after radiofrequency catheter ablation have been previously described in animal experiments. Acute changes have also been described in four cadaveric human specimens. We describe post-mortem observations of a recent radiofrequency catheter ablation site in a patient who underwent successful ablation for refractory ventricular tachycardia. Our gross and microscopic observations are similar to those previously described in animal experiments and confirm that the animal experimental results can be extrapolated to human hearts. As the use of radiofrequency becomes more prevalent as an alternative treatment for refractory cardiac tachycardias, pathologists will be called upon to identify post-mortem the lesions described. These lesions can be specifically identified, which can serve as a useful verification for this procedure.
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ranking = 3
keywords = animal
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4/7. Renal transplantation for chronic renal failure in acute porphyria.

    A woman with acute intermittent porphyria and a man with variegate porphyria developed chronic renal failure in middle age. After periods on haemodialysis, both received successful cadaveric renal transplants. On the basis of animal porphyrinogenicity studies prednisolone and azathioprine were used in preference to cyclosporin as immunosuppressive agents. Neither of the patients showed any evidence of activation of their porphyria during, or following, transplantation. The findings in these two patients and a review of two previous reports indicate that acute porphyria is not a contraindication to renal transplantation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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5/7. The temporalis muscle flap in oral reconstruction. A cadaveric, animal and clinical study.

    The possibility of rotating the temporalis muscle down into the mouth, after division of the zygomatic arch and base of the coronoid, was studied in cadaver material and in the rhesus monkey. Six human subjects are described in whom this muscle flap was employed successfully in oral reconstruction after either hemimandibulectomy or hemimaxillectomy. The flap remained viable in all subjects, and in six experimental monkeys. It proved useful in contour restoration, repair of the palate and of the floor of mouth. Further work is being undertaken on combination with skin grafts and myocutaneous flaps.
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ranking = 4
keywords = animal
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6/7. Minimally invasive abdominoplasty: surgical technique development and report of three cases.

    Endoscopically assisted rectus abdominis plication is a safe and effective method of repair in patients with mild to moderate central abdominal wall flaccidity. A procedure was developed in animals and in a human cadaver using a single umbilical incision, gasless dissection of the anterior rectus abdominis fascia, and suture plication under endoscopic guidance. This procedure was performed successfully in three patients. Early postoperative results were comparable to those obtained by standard rectus abdominis plication. Moreover, adjunctive suction lipectomy or a limited abdominal skin resection can be used to expand the contouring capability of this technique.
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ranking = 1
keywords = animal
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7/7. Anterior endoscopic approach to the thoracolumbar spine.

    STUDY DESIGN: A technique for anterior endoscopic exposure of the thoracolumbar spine is described. OBJECTIVE: To develop an endoscopic approach to the thoracolumbar spine with fewer complications than are encountered in the conventional approach. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The efficacy of the anterior endoscopic approach to the thoracic spine has been shown. The thoracolumbar hinge is usually approached by open surgery. methods: The study was performed in three stages. The first phase was carried out on experimental animals (pigs). Once the bases were established, the approach was studied in fresh cadavers. Finally, it was performed on three patients with thoracolumbar scoliosis who required discectomy and anterior release. RESULTS: After a series of attempts on the animals, it was found that the most effective method for exposure of the thoracolumbar spine was the initial thoracoscopic approach followed by the retroperitoneal endoscopic approach. This was confirmed in cadavers. When applied to the clinical situation, there were no significant complications in any of the patients treated with this method, and postoperative pain and discomfort were minimal. CONCLUSIONS: The anterior endoscopic approach to the lumbar spine involves minor trauma, results in rapid recovery and less pain, and produces good results aesthetically.
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ranking = 2
keywords = animal
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