Cases reported "Cadmium Poisoning"

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1/8. Heavy metal poisoning in glass worker characterised by severe.

    The paper presents the clinical description of the masticatory organ and biochemical assessment of dental tissue in a patient employed in a glassworks for 20 years. During 12 years the patient has suffered baldness ("alopecia areata") and atypical extensive and non-healing cutaneous lesions. Dental examination revealed changes typical of chronic poisoning by cadmium and bismuth compounds.
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keywords = metal
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2/8. Chronic overexposure to cadmium fumes associated with IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis.

    BACKGROUND: Cadmium is a metal used in the zinc, copper and steel industries, and in the manufacture of electric batteries and solar cells. Acute cadmium poisoning is characterized by irritation of the respiratory tract, while in chronic poisoning the main target organ is the renal tubule. AIMS: We report a patient with chronic work overexposure to cadmium, who presented a IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis with no respiratory or renal tubule involvement. Case report A 39-year-old patient was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a glomerular nephropathy. For the past 12 years he had worked as a welder, using cadmium electrodes. The patient had no respiratory symptoms and the chest X-ray was normal. Tests showed a proteinuria of 2 g in 24 h with microhaematuria [150 red blood cells/high power field (rbc/hpf)], with preservation of the renal function (creatinine clearance of 137 ml/min). The concentrations of cadmium in blood and urine were 45 micro g/l and 25 micro g/g creatinine, and an environmental study showed that levels of cadmium in the workplace were 52 micro g/m(3). A renal biopsy showed an IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis. The patient ceased to work with cadmium, and 1 year later cadmium levels had decreased and renal function was found to be stable. CONCLUSIONS: IgA mesangial glomerulonephritis is a disease of unknown aetiology which has been associated with other diseases. Chronic overexposure to cadmium may contribute to the development of this nephrophathy.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = metal
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3/8. acute lung injury due to cadmium inhalation--a case report.

    Heavy metal inhalation is a rare cause of acute lung injury. Among the various heavy metals, cadmium is more commonly known to cause acute lung injury. A case of accidental inhalation of cadmium fumes in a young male is presented. The incident occurred in local silver jewellery manufacturing unit.
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ranking = 73.435141569299
keywords = heavy metal, metal
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4/8. Acute respiratory fatality associated with exposure to sheet metal and cadmium fumes.

    The authors report on a case of an acute fatality characterized by abdominal pain and respiratory failure occurring soon after beginning to weld and solder galvanized sheet metal. heating of galvanized sheet metal is a recognized cause of metal fume fever, data from this patient suggests an additional and unrecognized risk for cadmium poisoning.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = metal
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5/8. Abnormalities in pulmonary function after brief exposure to toxic metal fumes.

    A 26-year-old welder became ill after exposure to zinc and cadmium fumes at work. His initial clinical course was consistent with that of metal fume fever, but persistence of symptoms and signs beyond the usual duration in this condition led to suspicion of a toxic pulmonary reaction to cadmium. The finding of high percentages of both metals in the urine confirmed this diagnosis. Pulmonary function tests showed restriction of lung volumes, with increased elastic recoil and reduced diffusion, but no evidence of airways obstruction. Chest roentgenograms indicated central pulmonary edema, which cleared in 6 days. Follow-up assessment 2 years later showed incomplete improvement of the restrictive ventilatory defect.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = metal
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6/8. Chronic cadmium intoxication caused by a dental prosthesis.

    We present a case of chronic cadmium intoxication caused by a gold dental prosthesis. The first symptoms of the disease appeared 2 years after insertion and gradually intensified over the next 3 years. Analysis of blood and urine samples, as well as parts of the prosthesis, revealed an excessive concentration of cadmium. The prosthesis was removed and the concentration of cadmium gradually returned to normal, with an amelioration of symptoms. This case illustrates the importance of investigating the possibility of intoxication with a heavy metal when symptoms of chronic illness accompany the presence of a prosthesis.
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ranking = 73.185141569299
keywords = heavy metal, metal
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7/8. Cadmium chemical pneumonitis.

    Metal fume exposures are common to a number of trades and may result in the self-limited acute toxic syndrome of metal fume fever. Acute inhalational cadmium toxicity may mimic metal fume fever on initial presentation, but may have a markedly different clinical course. We report a case of cadmium-induced chemical pneumonitis in a welder who, over four years, has shown persistent pulmonary function abnormalities. The potential for acute cadmium toxicity needs to be considered in any patient suspected of having metal fume fever.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = metal
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8/8. Elevated urinary cadmium concentrations in a patient with acute cadmium pneumonitis.

    BACKGROUND: Acute serious inhalation of cadmium fumes often causes chemical pneumonitis or metal fume fever. Because symptoms of both diseases begin several hours after exposure and closely mimic each other, one often mistakes chemical pneumonitis for metal fume fever in the early stages. It is, however, essential to differentiate between the two since chemical pneumonitis can progress to serious consequences. CASE: A 43-year-old man was admitted to the hospital 2 d after exposure to cadmium fumes. The initial diagnosis was metal fume fever on the basis of his history, and he was treated accordingly. His symptoms worsened however, and transient renal impairment was identified as consistent with cadmium-induced renal toxicity. Although the possibility of drug-induced renal damage could not be excluded, abnormal urinalysis findings on admission suggested that the renal tubular damage was caused by inhaled cadmium before admission. CONCLUSIONS: Measuring the urinary cadmium concentration is an effective method for confirming acute cadmium poisoning.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = metal
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