Cases reported "Calcinosis"

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1/81. Calcified chronic subdural hematoma: case report.

    Calcified or ossified chronic subdural hematoma is a rare entity that usually presents as a space-occupying lesion over the cerebral convexity. We report a case of calcified and ossified chronic subdural hematoma in an unusual location that has not been previously reported. A 24-year-old man with a history of tonic-clonic convulsions since 7 months of age was admitted because of increasing frequency and duration of seizures. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a fusiform extra-axial lesion just above the tentorium and adjacent to the cerebral falx. A calcified and ossified chronic subdural hematoma was noted and was almost completely removed by craniotomy. Better seizure control was achieved by removal of the calcified chronic subdural hematoma. Calcified subdural hematoma, calcified epidural hematoma, calcified empyema, meningioma, calcified arachnoid cyst, and calcified convexity of the dura mater with acute epidural hematoma should be considered for the differential diagnosis of an extra-axial calcified lesion.
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2/81. Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome: a genetic microangiopathy?

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) (McKusick 225750) is an autosomal recessive disease with onset in the 1st year of life, resulting in progressive microcephaly, calcification of cerebral white matter, thalamus and basal ganglia, generalized cerebral demyelination and a chronic low-grade CSF lymphocytosis, without evidence of infection. We report the autopsy of a patient who died with this disorder at the age of 17 years. Findings were severe microencephaly, diffuse but inhomogeneous cerebral white matter loss with associated astrocytosis, calcific deposits in the white matter, thalami and basal ganglia. neocortex and cerebellar cortex were affected by wedge-shaped microinfarctions. Small vessels showed calcification in the media, adventitia and perivascular spaces. These findings are similar to some previous publications that in retrospect may have been AGS, but this is the first reported cerebral microangiopathy in which the diagnosis AGS was made during lifetime. This report provides evidence that microangiopathy plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of AGS.
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3/81. Large cell calcifying sertoli cell tumor of the testis: a clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of two cases.

    Large cell calcifying sertoli cell tumor of the testis (LCCSCT) is a rare tumor that is usually benign and multifocal. It may be associated with hereditary endocrine anomalies such as Carney's and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes. Malignant forms are exceptional. Two cases of LCCSCT, one malignant and one benign are described. Both were composed of cords and trabeculae of large polygonal cells embedded in a myxoid and fibrous stroma with areas of calcification. The malignant tumor showed nuclear atypia, necrosis, and abundant mitoses. The cells were positive for vimentin and S-100 protein, and the intercellular space for laminin and collagen type IV. By electron microscopy, nucleolonemas and multilayered basal lamina were seen. The benign tumor was positive for vimentin and S-100 protein, and ultrastructurally showed less basal lamina.
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4/81. Abdominal, scrotal, and thoracic calcifications owing to healed meconium peritonitis.

    meconium peritonitis is a form of chemical peritonitis resulting from in utero perforation of the gastrointestinal tract, with subsequent leakage of sterile meconium into the peritoneal cavity and the potential spaces connected with it. Involvement of the tunica vaginalis may be the sole presenting clinical manifestation of the gut perforation resolving spontaneously. In such instances, radiologically detectable calcifications in the abdomen, scrotum, and thorax are essential diagnostic points. In this study, a 4-month-old baby with abdominal, scrotal, and thoracic calcifications owing to healed meconium peritonitis is presented.
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5/81. Symptomatic calcified subdural hematomas.

    Two unique cases of chronic calcified subdural hematomas are reported in children as a long-term complication of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Both the patients had undergone shunt procedures in infancy for congenital hydrocephalus. In one patient, the cause of the hydrocephalus was aqueduct stenosis, while in the second patient, a lumbar meningomyelocele was associated with hydrocephalus. In both these patients, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was done in infancy. In one of them, following the shunt surgery, a bilateral subdural collection was noticed which required burr hole evacuation. Both the patients remained asymptomatic for 9 years, when they presented to our center with acute raised intracranial pressure and contralateral hemiparesis. Both the patients had a relatively short history and had altered sensorium at admission. Surprisingly, in both the patients, the CT scan showed significant mass effect producing calcified subdural hematomas. The shunt systems were found to be working well at surgery. craniotomy and excision of the calcified subdural hematomas was undertaken. Postoperatively, the patients showed satisfactory recovery, and at discharge the patients were doing well. At the follow-up at the outpatient clinic, the patients were asymptomatic.
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ranking = 0.88689767329624
keywords = subdural
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6/81. Giant cystic craniopharyngiomas with extension into the posterior fossa.

    Between 1991 and 1998, 24 patients underwent surgery for a craniopharyngioma in our department. This group included two patients who had tumors with extensive growth along the midline, and along the posterior fossa in particular. In both cases suprasellar calcifications were typical features on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). A 7-year-old boy presented with a 6-month history of headache, nausea, and progressive unilateral hearing loss. With a suboccipital approach it was possible to remove the main part of the tumor. In a 13-year-old boy headache and visual deterioration led to the diagnosis of a craniopharyngioma, which was removed with a pterional approach. For the neuroimaging work-up in such cases of atypically growing craniopharyngiomas MRI is the method of choice. Additional CT scanning is recommended, which provides valuable information about bony changes at the skull base due to space-occupying growth. CT substantiates the differential diagnosis if typical calcifications are seen.
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7/81. Organized chronic subdural hematoma requiring craniotomy--five case reports.

    Two child and three elderly patients underwent craniotomy for organized and/or partially calcified chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs). The characteristic feature of magnetic resonance imaging was a heterogeneous web-like structure in the hematoma cavity. Both children had undergone one side subduroperitoneal shunt for bilateral CSHs when infants. As a result, the opposite hematoma cavities persisted and developed into calcified CSHs after a couple of years. All three elderly patients with senile brain atrophy showed various systemic complications such as cerebral infarction, diabetes mellitus, leg ulceration, cirrhosis, and bleeding tendency. craniotomy for removal of the hematoma and calcification achieved good results in all patients. subdural space created by shunt, craniotomy, or brain atrophy and persisting for a certain period, and additional various brain damage such as microcirculatory disorder, meningitis, encephalitis, or premature delivery may be important in generating calcified or organized CSH.
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ranking = 0.55655116335188
keywords = subdural, space
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8/81. Spinal toxoplasmic arachnoiditis associated with osteoid formation: a rare presentation of toxoplasmosis.

    STUDY DESIGN: An extremely rare presentation of an isolated spinal toxoplasmic arachnoiditis is described. OBJECTIVE: To draw attention to the fact that spinal arachnoid membranes may be a potential reservoir for toxoplasma gondii. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: central nervous system toxoplasmosis is a common manifestation in patients who are immunodeficient. Reports on the spinal toxoplasmosis are rare and focused on spinal cord involvement. methods: An adult patient presented with symptoms of spastic paraparesis that had begun 13 years before admission. Thoracic spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed small lesions in posterior subarachnoid space at Th7-Th8. A Th7-Th8 laminectomy was performed. Intradural-extramedullary lesions were excised. RESULTS: Clinical, immunologic, and pathologic examinations showed adhesive spinal arachnoiditis associated with osteoid formation caused by past toxoplasmic infection. There was no impairment of the immunologic defense system. CONCLUSION: Where no causative factor is found in serious spinal adhesive arachnoiditis, the possibility of spinal toxoplasmosis should also be investigated.
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9/81. natural history of paediatric intervertebral disc calcification.

    This case report concerns a 5-year-old boy who had intervertebral disc calcification with involvement of two disc spaces and herniation of nucleus pulposus in one. The patient's symptoms resolved completely in a week with conservative measures. At the 4-year follow-up, the child was symptom-free and in full health, the herniation of nucleus pulposus had resolved completely, and calcification had disappeared in one of the disc spaces. Although the cause of this disorder is uncertain, the course is benign and self-limiting, it seldom requires surgical intervention, and the natural history is one of resolution and complete resorption of the calcification.
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10/81. Case of the month. Symptomatic chronic calcified subdural hematoma in a 5-year-old child.

    Head trauma is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. The pathophysiology and clinical outcomes of head trauma differ between children and adults. Traumatic mass lesions such as subdural and epidural hematomas occur less frequently in children and, when present, are associated with lower mortality. Subdural hematoma is the collection of blood on the cortical surface beneath the dura with bleeding from bridging veins or cortical arteries. These hematomas are usually associated with trauma. Chronic subdural hematomas are much more common in infants and frequently exist as a single entity; it is rare for chronic subdural fluid accumulations to occur after one year of age. Specific traumatic events are usually unrecognized or unreported. In rare instances, subdural hematoma may indicate an underlying bleeding disorder, hematological malignancy or benign expansion of subarachnoid space. We report the dramatic presentation of a strikingly large calcified chronic subdural hematoma in a 5-year-old with increased intracranial pressure and subfalcine herniation.
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keywords = subdural, space
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