Cases reported "Calculi"

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11/14. Disintegration of a pancreatic duct stone with extracorporeal shock waves in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with chronic calcifying pancreatitis in whom an intraductal pancreatic stone with a diameter of 8 mm was successfully disintegrated with extracorporeal shock waves, permitting subsequent endoscopic extraction of the fragments. The patient had a mild attack of pancreatitis after the treatment. We conclude that shockwave lithotripsy of a pancreatic duct stone in patients with chronic pancreatitis is possible. It should, however, be viewed with reservation until further experience has been gained.
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12/14. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy of pancreatic duct stones: immediate and long-term results.

    To study the efficacy of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of pancreatic duct stones, seventeen patients (mean age: 42 years) with recurrent attacks of abdominal pain as a result of chronic calcifying pancreatitis were treated with this method. In all cases, endoscopic removal of the stones proved impossible. When there was fragmentation, the remaining calculi and fragments either evacuated spontaneously, or attempts were made to extract them endoscopically, followed by flushing. In 13 patients (76%), fragmentation of stones was achieved, and 11 of these patients had dramatic pain relief directly after ESWL (65%). However, complete ductal clearance of stones was achieved in only seven patients (41%); at the last follow-up (12-59 months after ESWL, mean: 30 months), all seven were free of symptoms. Of the six patients with stone fragmentation without ductal clearance, three were operated on because of recurrent complaints. The only complication due to the procedure was an exacerbation of pancreatitis in one patient, which was treated conservatively. If pancreatic stones cannot be removed endoscopically, ESWL seems to be preferable to surgery, which may still be performed in case of failure. It seems important to achieve ductal clearance and not merely stone disintegration in order to obtain the desired long-term clinical effects.
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13/14. Postoperative choledochofiberscopic removal of intrahepatic stones.

    An endoscopic approach for the diagnosis and treatment of intrahepatic stones is presented based on the experience of 4 cases, in which complete removal of intrahepatic stones was done by postoperative choledochoscopy. Postoperative choledochoscopy for the diagnosis and treatment of gallstone disease is not difficult to perform. The choledochofiberscope is inserted into the bile duct via choledochal fistula 3 weeks after the operation. Stones are crushed or grasped with forceps under direct vision. In some cases, the stricture in the intrahepatic biliary tree is dilated with the use of a high frequency waves cutting knife to facilitate stone removal. In fact, over 410 stones were successfully removed in one case by 28 postoperative choledochoscopies without any complications. The details of the choledochofiberscope developed by us with the close cooperation of Machida Company of tokyo was presented. Postoperative choledochoscopy seems to be a safe and simple procedure and is useful in the treatment of intrahepatic stones.
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14/14. Dumbbell stone of prostatic fossa after prostatectomy. A combined ESWL and suprapubic percutaneous treatment.

    We report our experience with a combined treatment of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous suprapubic lithotripsy for a dumbbell-shaped stone of prostatic fossa associated with multiple bladder calculi, in the same operative session. Because of the successful result, we believe the association of the two treatments for this complex calculus to be an easy, effective and minimally invasive method. ESWL should be considered for the primary management of these rare calculi, suprapubic percutaneous endoscopy can be helpful in rapid and complete removal of fragments.
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