Cases reported "Candidiasis, Oral"

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1/10. Successful treatment of fluconazole-resistant oropharyngeal candidiasis by a combination of fluconazole and terbinafine.

    Increasing incidence of resistance to conventional antifungal therapy has demanded that novel therapies be introduced. Recent in vitro studies have shown that combinations involving azoles and allylamines may be effective in inhibiting fluconazole-resistant fungi. In this report, we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with white patches on her buccal mucosa, tongue, and palate with a bright erythematous erosive base. A fungal culture revealed candida albicans. The patient failed to respond to the initially prescribed fluconazole therapy. Failure of therapy can be attributed to a developed resistance to fluconazole from the patient's intermittent use of this antifungal agent at varying dosages for the preceding 2 years due to a diagnosis of onychomycosis. in vitro testing of the culture from the patient showed elevated MICs of fluconazole, itraconzole, and terbinafine (MICs were 32, 0.5, and 64 microg/ml, respectively). Our goal was to combine therapies of fluconazole and terbinafine in an attempt to clear the fungal infection. Impressively, this combination resulted in the clearing of the clinical symptoms and the patient has successfully been asymptomatic for more than 12 months posttreatment.
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2/10. Tuberculous ulcer of the tongue as presenting feature of pulmonary tuberculosis and hiv infection.

    tuberculosis (TB), once a lethal disease, has shown a decrease in incidence with improved public health measures and availability of antituberculous drugs. But with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), it has re-emerged alarmingly as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. Lungs are the most commonly affected organs and involvement of the oropharyngeal region in TB is very rare. Two cases of TB manifesting as ulcer of the tongue are reported here. Interestingly, both of these cases were reported within a span of six months and both of the patients were in their early thirties. A primary diagnosis of both pulmonary TB and hiv sero-positivity was made after the diagnosis of the oral TB ulcer.
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3/10. Pseudomembranous candidosis in nephrotic syndrome: a case report.

    A 33-year-old male presented for evaluation of several large, recently discovered white oral lesions of unknown duration. Clinical examination revealed multiple white plaques on the soft palate, uvula, buccal mucosa, and tongue. These lesions could be wiped away, leaving an erythematous base. The lesions were asymptomatic, and the patient did not report difficulty in swallowing. The patient's medical history was noteworthy for several significant diagnoses within the previous 6 months: type 2 diabetes mellitus, mild systolic hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and adult idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, determined by kidney biopsy to be caused by focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. A provisional diagnosis of pseudomembraneous candidosis was made, and the patient responded to a 14-day course of clotrimazole, administered in 10-mg troches, five times a day. Management of nephrotic syndrome predisposes patients to recurrent fungal infections, and the disease has implications for the selection of systemic antifungal agents.
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4/10. White plaque of the lateral tongue.

    A healthy 48-year old white woman presented with a chief complaint of an 'irritated' sensation involving her tongue. The problem seemed to be limited to her left lateral tongue and had been noticed for at least six months by the patient. She also indicated the condition varied in severity.
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5/10. Oral candidosis in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a case report.

    Though oral candidosis is an opportunistic fungal infection that commonly affects immunocompromised patients, little is known of its occurrence as a complication of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This paper reports a case of oral candidosis in a 20-year-old Indonesian woman with this lymphoproliferative disease. She presented with acute pseudomembranous candidosis on the dorsum and lateral borders of the tongue, bilateral angular cheilitis and cheilocandidosis. The latter is a rare clinical variant of oral candidosis, and the lesions affecting the vermilion borders presented as an admixture of superficial erosions, ulcers and white plaques. Clinical findings were confirmed with oral smears and swabs that demonstrated the presence of hyphae, pseudohyphae and blastospores, and colonies identified as candida albicans. A culture from a saline rinse was also positive for multiple candidal colonies. lip and oral lesions were managed with nystatin. The lesions regressed with subsequent crusting on the lips, and overall reduction in oral thrush. As Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is a neoplastic disease that produces a chronic immunosuppressive state, management of its oral complications, including those due to oral candidosis, is considered a long-term indication.
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6/10. Oral papillary plasmacytosis resembling candidosis without demonstrable fungus in lesional tissue.

    Two cases with exuberant papillary and nodular hyperplasia of the hard and soft palates are described. Both were elderly edentulous men with bilateral angular stomatitis. The papillary hyperplasia extended as far as the epiglottis and was associated with swelling and fissuring of the upper lip in patient 1. In patient 2, the palatal change extended to the maxillary gingiva and was associated with smooth plaques and fissuring of the dorsal tongue. histology of both cases showed a dense polyclonal plasma-cell infiltrate with overlying epithelial hyperplasia, parakeratinization and neutrophil micro-abscesses suggesting Candida infection but fungal elements could not be demonstrated. Patient 1 also showed defective cellular immunity to Candida antigen which was reversed by treatment with ketoconazole and levamisole, antedating clinical improvement.
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7/10. Rhomboid glossitis in atypical location: case report and differential diagnosis.

    Median rhomboid glossitis (MRG) is an uncommon benign abnormality of the tongue, most frequently affecting men. It is typically located around the midline of the dorsum of the tongue, anterior to the lingual "V", appearing as a reddish, rhomboid area, depapillated, flat maculate or mamillated and raised by 2 - 5 mm. This paper reports a case of rhomboid glossitis in a 61-year-old man who consulted for a painless raised lesion on the dorsum of the tongue, in left paramedial (not medial) location. Histopathological findings were compatible with rhomboid glossitis. Other diagnoses considered but ruled out on the basis of the clinical and histopathological findings were haemangioma, pyogenic granuloma, amyloidosis, granular cell tumour, and squamous cell carcinoma. This case confirms that rhomboid glossitis may occur in paramedial locations.
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8/10. oral manifestations during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report.

    A 14-year-old, male patient was referred for the treatment of mucositis, idiopathic facial asymmetry, and candidiasis. The patient had been undergoing chemotherapy for 5 years for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He presented with a swollen face, fever, and generalized symptomatology in the mouth with burning. On physical examination, general signs of poor health, paleness, malnutrition, and jaundice were observed. The extraoral clinical examination showed edema on the right side of the face and cutaneous erythema. On intraoral clinical examination, generalized ulcers with extensive necrosis on the hard palate mucosa were observed, extending to the posterior region. Both free and attached gingivae were ulcerated and edematous with exudation and spontaneous bleeding, mainly in the superior and inferior anterior teeth region. The tongue had no papillae and was coated, due to poor oral hygiene. The patient also presented with carious white lesions and enamel hypoplasia, mouth opening limitation, and foul odor. After exfoliative cytology of the affected areas, the diagnosis was mixed infection by candida albicans and bacteria. Recommended treatment was antibiotics and antifungal administration, periodontal prophylaxis, topical application of fluor 1.23%, and orientation on and control of proper oral hygiene and diet during the remission phase of the disease.
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9/10. carcinoma of the dorsum of the tongue: a rarity or misdiagnosis.

    Benign lesions occurring on the dorsum of the tongue have at times been diagnosed as carcinoma. A retrospective investigation into the problem is described and the clinical and histological difficulties that arise in the diagnosis of these lesions are discussed. It is concluded that the occurrence of primary carcinoma on the dorsum of the tongue is a rare entity. It may be erroneously diagnosed in cases of median rhomboid glossitis, granular cell myoblastoma and any other lesion associated with pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. These conditions should always be considered when examining lesions in this location. Histological diagnosis, although difficult, is greatly facilitated by good biopsy technique but, above all, good liaison between surgeon, radiotherapist and pathologist is essential if these mistakes in diagnosis are to be avoided.
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10/10. Burning mouth: an analysis of 57 patients.

    The burning mouth complaint of each of fifty-seven patients was thoroughly studied. Psychogenesis was found to be the most frequent cause, followed by geographic tongue and moniliasis. Multiple causative factors, such as psychogenesis and moniliasis and psychogenesis and geographic tongue, were found in some patients. The purely psychogenic group was composed mostly of postmenopausal women. The tongue and palate were the most frequently affected sites. There were some similarities among patients in the geographic tongue and psychogenesis groups. A diagnostic protocol for patients with burning mouth is described.
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