Cases reported "Carbon Monoxide Poisoning"

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1/34. An unusual case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Carbon monoxide, a gas originating from incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, is an important cause of human deaths. In this paper, we describe an unusual carbon monoxide poisoning in a dwelling without obvious sources of combustion gases, for which two adults had to be treated in a hyperbaric chamber. Carbon monoxide readings were taken in the house and in the neighboring homes. methane gas and nitrogen oxide levels were also monitored in the house air. soil samples were collected around the house and tested for hydrocarbon residues. The investigation revealed the presence of a pocket of carbon monoxide under the foundation of the house. The first readings revealed carbon monoxide levels of 500 ppm in the basement. The contamination lasted for a week. The investigation indicated that the probable source of contamination was the use of explosives at a nearby rain sewer construction site. The use of explosives in a residential area can constitute a major source of carbon monoxide for the neighboring populations. This must be investigated, and public health authorities, primary-care physicians, governmental authorities, and users and manufacturers of explosives must be made aware of this problem.
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2/34. Four deaths due to carbon monoxide poisoning in car washes.

    In a period of 13 months, three separate incidents of lethal carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in closed car wash bays resulted in the deaths of 4 white men aged 20 to 36 years. Each man appears to have been intoxicated with mind-altering substances, which may impair judgment, perception of outside conditions, and self-awareness. All four died in winter months. For three men, the deaths were ruled accidental, and for the remaining man, the previous deaths appear to have provided a model for suicide. Warning signs may not be effective to prevent future CO deaths in car washes because of the possible role of intoxication. Mechanical or electronic methods to prevent a bay door from closing completely may be preferable.
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3/34. Extracorporeal support in an adult with severe carbon monoxide poisoning and shock following smoke inhalation: a case report.

    The objective of this study was to discuss the case of a patient with severe smoke inhalation-related respiratory failure treated with extracorporeal support. The study was set in a 12-bed multi-trauma intensive care unit at a level one trauma center and hyperbaric medicine center. The patient under investigation had carbon monoxide poisoning, and developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and cardiovascular collapse following smoke inhalation. Rapid initiation of extracorporeal support, extreme inverse-ratio ventilation and intermittent prone positioning therapy were carried out. Admission and serial carboxyhemoglobin levels, blood gases, and computerized tomography of the chest were obtained. The patient developed severe hypoxia and progressed to cardiovascular collapse resistant to resuscitation and vasoactive infusions. Veno-venous extracorporeal support was initiated. Cardiovascular parameters of blood pressure, cardiac output, and oxygen delivery were maximized; oxygenation and ventilation were supported via the extracorporeal circuit. Airway pressure release ventilation and intermittent prone positioning therapy were instituted. Following 7 days of extracorporeal support, the patient was decannulated and subsequently discharged to a transitional care facility,neurologically intact. smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning may lead to life-threatening hypoxemia associated with resultant cardiovascular instability. When oxygenation and ventilation cannot be achieved via maximal ventilatory management, extracorporeal support may prevent death if initiated rapidly.
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4/34. Occupational intoxication with carbon monoxide.

    The most important safety measure for prevention of CO poisoning is the installation of automatic systems that signal high CO concentrations in the work environment. public health measures that include stringent pollution control, introduction of low-cost CO monitors, and public education aimed at the high-risk population (e.g., new workers, drivers) should decrease the number of deaths from CO poisoning and should save productive years of life. Toxicity of CO is a consequence of tissue hypoxia created by the displacement of oxygen from hemoglobin and the subsequent impairment of oxygen release to the tissues. Early symptoms of CO intoxication are insidious and can resemble other diseases; physical examination may be unremarkable. For these reasons, many cases of CO poisoning are not readily recognized.
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5/34. Apoptotic and necrotic brain lesions in a fatal case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    A 41-year-old man was accidentally exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) gas and found in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest while he took bath. After admission, he was resuscitated and underwent artificial ventilation in a comatose state and died about 19h later. Computed tomography (CT) examination disclosed bilateral low density area in the basal ganglia and the thalamus, a well-known finding in the CO intoxication. Necropsy, histological examination, dna ladder assay gave the first line of evidence for the presence of apoptosis as well as necrosis in the human case of CO intoxication. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) positive apoptotic cells were more predominant in the CA2 area than in CA1 area. There is general co-relation between the ratio of TUNEL-positive cells and the dna laddering on the agarose gel. basal ganglia and thalamus, which showed bilateral low density area in CT, were revealed to be severe edema. The two types of cell death occurred in the cortex, basal ganglia, hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebellum. Hypoxia caused by CO-hemoglobin formation alone cannot explain the phenomena.
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6/34. carbon monoxide poisoning without cherry-red livor.

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning typically causes so-called cherry-red livor of the skin and viscera. The authors report a case of CO poisoning in which cherry-red livor did not develop. The decedent was a 75-year-old white man who was found dead in his car during a cold winter. Blood CO saturation was 86%. The death was attributed to CO poisoning, and the manner of death was designated suicide. The curious absence of cherry-red livor was studied. The decedent's tissue and blood specimens were tested at different temperatures. There was no tendency for either type of specimen to develop cherry-red color at cold or warm temperatures. The antemortem response of the skin to cold possibly sequestered CO-saturated blood in the cadaver. As regards the viscera, there are other proteins to which CO can bond, and possibly these proteins contribute to the development of visceral cherry-red livor. In this case, the absence of cherry-red livor could have led to misclassification of the cause and manner of death. The medicolegal and social consequences of such misclassification can be significant, and psychiatric history, which may be useful to surviving family members, could be lost.
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7/34. Fatal carbon monoxide poisoning after the detonation of explosives in an underground mine: a case report.

    An unusual death caused by carbon monoxide poisoning after the detonation of explosives in an underground mine was investigated by the Office of the Medical Investigator of the State of new mexico. The 50-year-old miner had 18 years of mining experience but no documented safety training. He collapsed approximately 20 minutes after entering the mine and working at the bottom of the single vertical shaft. The tight confines of the mine shaft hindered rescue personnel from reaching him, and the body was not recovered until 2 days later. The autopsy showed severe coronary artery atherosclerosis with remote and resolving myocardial microinfarcts, as well as the characteristic pink lividity of carbon monoxide poisoning, which was confirmed by laboratory analysis. Detailed investigation of the scene revealed no sources of carbon monoxide other than the explosives. The case represents an uncommon cause of death in mining that may have been avoided through the use of proper safety procedures, and illustrates the importance of recognizing the many sources of carbon monoxide.
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8/34. Asphyxial deaths caused by automobile exhaust inhalation not attributable to carbon monoxide toxicity: study of 2 cases.

    The authors report two suicides that resulted from the intentional inhalation of automobile exhaust gases in which death occurred without the formation of physiologically significant amounts of carboxyhemoglobin. These circumstances are correlated with measurements of the involved vehicles' exhaust gases, which showed reduced concentrations of carbon monoxide present, reflecting improvements in automobile engine technology. In the absence of carbon monoxide toxicity, the authors attribute death in these cases to asphyxia caused by carbon dioxide intoxication and diminished atmospheric oxygen concentrations.
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9/34. Carbon-monoxide poisoning resulting from exposure to ski-boat exhaust--georgia, June 2002.

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas produced from the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels such as gasoline or wood. In the united states, CO poisoning causes approximately 500 unintentional deaths each year. Although CO poisonings often have been reported to occur in enclosed and semi-enclosed environments, they can also occur in open-air environments. This report describes two related cases of CO poisoning that occurred in children who were participating in recreational activities on a ski boat. Recreational boaters should be aware of the dangers of open-air CO poisoning, and engineering solutions are needed to reduce the amount of CO in boat exhaust.
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10/34. A death in a stationary vehicle whilst idling: unusual carbon monoxide poisoning by exhaust gases.

    In this paper, we describe an autopsy case in which death was due to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning occurring in a stationary vehicle idling in an open space. To investigate the source of the fatal fumes, the death scene situation was reconstructed using the vehicle. Exhaust gases were found to invade the interior through the floor from a defective exhaust system. CO gas was detected while idling and the level in the cabin gradually rose to 1.5% over a 2-h period. Since the 8-year-old motor vehicle seemed to have been defective for some months, it was concluded that stationary idling overnight caused an accumulation of toxic gases in the interior.
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ranking = 6
keywords = death
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