Cases reported "Carbon Monoxide Poisoning"

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11/143. Unusual CT and MRI appearance of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Unilateral low attenuation areas within the right putamen, globus pallidus and thalamus were observed on CT in a patient after exposure to carbon monoxide. A transient bilateral appearance was found on subsequent CT examinations. Hemorrhagic infarction of the right putamen, and ischemic lesions in both thalami were visualized on MRI 2 weeks later.
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keywords = transient
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12/143. Apoptotic and necrotic brain lesions in a fatal case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    A 41-year-old man was accidentally exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) gas and found in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest while he took bath. After admission, he was resuscitated and underwent artificial ventilation in a comatose state and died about 19h later. Computed tomography (CT) examination disclosed bilateral low density area in the basal ganglia and the thalamus, a well-known finding in the CO intoxication. Necropsy, histological examination, dna ladder assay gave the first line of evidence for the presence of apoptosis as well as necrosis in the human case of CO intoxication. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) positive apoptotic cells were more predominant in the CA2 area than in CA1 area. There is general co-relation between the ratio of TUNEL-positive cells and the dna laddering on the agarose gel. basal ganglia and thalamus, which showed bilateral low density area in CT, were revealed to be severe edema. The two types of cell death occurred in the cortex, basal ganglia, hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebellum. Hypoxia caused by CO-hemoglobin formation alone cannot explain the phenomena.
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ranking = 7675.3711190382
keywords = tic
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13/143. Cardiac damage in pediatric carbon monoxide poisoning.

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disorders including myocardial ischemia and heart failure have been described in both laboratory animals and humans following carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide cardiotoxicity may be clinically occult and often remains undiagnosed because of the lack of overt symptoms and specific ischemic changes in the electrocardiogram. Routine myocardial necrosis markers have low diagnostic efficiency, particularly in patients with concomitant skeletal muscle necrosis or multiple organ failure complicating carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide-induced cardiotoxicity has been investigated rarely in children. CASE REPORT: This paper describes carbon monoxide poisoning in a 12-year-old child who suffered from occult cardiac damage despite mild symptoms and low carboxy hemoglobin concentrations. Myocardial and mitral valve dysfunctions were observed, suggesting an ischemia-like syndrome. Cardiac damage was completely reversible within 1 month. CONCLUSION: This case report supports that a prolonged carbon monoxide exposure can cause cardiac damage in children even in the absence of specific symptoms, cerebral failure and high carboxyhemoglobin concentrations.
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ranking = 1705.6380264529
keywords = tic
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14/143. Neuronal damage in the interval form of CO poisoning determined by serial diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging plus 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    In a patient with the interval form of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning diffusion weighted MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) were serially performed immediately after the appearance of delayed sequelae (the 23rd day after exposure). During the period in which few clear findings were evident on MRI T2 weighted images, a high signal area in the cerebral white matter and relative decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCav) were already apparent on diffusion weighted images, with these findings thought to sensitively reflect the tissue injury associated with the onset of sequelae. The decrease in relative ADCav persisted until the 38th day after exposure. Subsequently, ADCav gradually increased, and in the cerebral white matter showed higher values in the 118th day after exposure than immediately after the onset of sequelae. During this period, on 1H-MRS choline containing compounds showed persistently high values throughout the course, with N-acetylaspartate depletion and the appearance of a lactate peak later in the course. These findings, with regional specificity in the cerebral white matter, reflect the developmental process of the white matter lesions in the interval form of CO poisoning in which demyelination progresses leading to neuronal necrosis. Serial diffusion weighted imaging plus 1H-MRS measurements are useful in determining the tissue damage and long term outcome of delayed sequelae associated with the interval form of CO poisoning.
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ranking = 7675.3711190382
keywords = tic
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15/143. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging reveals symmetric bitemporal cortical necrosis after carbon monoxide intoxication.

    High-resolution magnetic resonance images obtained in a patient several months after carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication revealed nearly symmetric regional atrophy of both lateral temporal lobes. This pattern of cortical lesions after CO exposure has not been reported before. The patient suffered from severe cognitive deficits including a transient Kluver-Bucy-like behavior. This report underlines the value of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in chronic stages of CO intoxication in the attempt to understand the neuroanatomical bases of the observed behavior.
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ranking = 9382.0091454911
keywords = tic, transient
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16/143. Hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning-induced delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae.

    The clinical manifestations of delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae after carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication are variable. In addition, there is no specific therapy for these complications. Fortunately, these complications have occurred less frequently in recent years, probably due to the usage of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. We report an 8-year-old boy who developed late psychiatric disturbances 2 days after full recovery of consciousness from initial CO intoxication. His neuropsychiatric symptoms included consciousness disturbance, motor dysfunction, chorea, aphasia and agnosias. He received HBO therapy at 2.0 barr for 60 minutes once a day for 7 consecutive days. Three weeks later, he was functioning normally with no neuropsychiatric symptoms. A literature review concluded that HBO may be effective in treating neuropsychiatric sequelae. Moreover, immediate administration of HBO during acute CO intoxication may prevent these complications.
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ranking = 3.1695822303124
keywords = motor
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17/143. Fatal carbon monoxide poisoning after the detonation of explosives in an underground mine: a case report.

    An unusual death caused by carbon monoxide poisoning after the detonation of explosives in an underground mine was investigated by the Office of the Medical Investigator of the State of new mexico. The 50-year-old miner had 18 years of mining experience but no documented safety training. He collapsed approximately 20 minutes after entering the mine and working at the bottom of the single vertical shaft. The tight confines of the mine shaft hindered rescue personnel from reaching him, and the body was not recovered until 2 days later. The autopsy showed severe coronary artery atherosclerosis with remote and resolving myocardial microinfarcts, as well as the characteristic pink lividity of carbon monoxide poisoning, which was confirmed by laboratory analysis. Detailed investigation of the scene revealed no sources of carbon monoxide other than the explosives. The case represents an uncommon cause of death in mining that may have been avoided through the use of proper safety procedures, and illustrates the importance of recognizing the many sources of carbon monoxide.
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ranking = 1705.6380264529
keywords = tic
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18/143. Pearls and pitfalls in the approach to patients with neurotoxic syndromes.

    neurotoxins are an important cause of neurologic disorders. A vast number of potentially neurotoxic compounds exist, including prescription drugs, illicit substances, and exposures through the workplace, residence, hobbies, and the environment. Effects of neurotoxins can mimic neurologic illnesses; therefore, it is important to consider neurotoxins in the differential diagnosis of any patient with neurological dysfunction. Paramount to the diagnosis of a possible neurotoxic syndrome is establishing causation. This can be done by a systematic approach utilizing principles in epidemiology and applying them to the individual patient. This approach is discussed in the following article in an attempt to bring structure to solving problems in a complex area of medicine.
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ranking = 1705.6380264529
keywords = tic
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19/143. diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) of two patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning demonstrated white matter and cortical hyperintensities. In one patient, the changes on the FLAIR sequence were more subtle than those on DWI. The DWI abnormality in this patient represented true restriction. In the second patient, repeated exposure to CO caused restricted diffusion. DWI may be helpful for earlier identification of the changes of acute CO poisoning.
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ranking = 852.81901322646
keywords = tic
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20/143. Dissociations in routine behaviour across patients and everyday tasks.

    We present a single case study of a patient, FK, who was severely impaired on routine, everyday tasks, such as preparing a cup of tea. We used the action coding system developed by Schwartz et al. to provide quantitative and qualitative measures of his performance in a number of experimental manipulations. In section A, we established FK's baseline performance on a range of tasks with (a) task-congruent objects only and (b) task-congruent objects and semantic distracters. In section B, we aimed to facilitate FK's performance by (a) giving him a pictorial representation of the goal, (b) giving him a set of written commands to follow, (c) giving him one command at a time, (d) demonstrating how the task should be performed and (e) dividing the task into smaller subgoals. We compared FK's performance with another patient, HG, to establish if there are qualitative differences between patients with 'action disorganization syndrome'. In section C, we aimed to hinder FK's performance by interrupting his execution of routine tasks. By comparing the factors that facilitated and impaired FK's performance in sections B and C, we hoped to isolate the key cognitive processes required to generate and control routine behaviour. In section D, we investigated how task demands impact on our ability to complete different everyday activities. The results of these experiments have important clinical implications for rehabilitation programmes for patients with action disorganization syndrome and can also help to distinguish between contemporary theoretical accounts of routine behaviour. In particular, we propose that patients who can be classified under the umbrella term of 'action disorganization syndrome' do not all have a reduction to 'non-specific cognitive resources' but can have qualitatively different impairments to a specialized action production system.
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ranking = 2558.4570396794
keywords = tic
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