Cases reported "Carcinoma, Bronchogenic"

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1/12. Reactivation of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy by bronchogenic carcinoma.

    This paper reports 2 cases of primary hypertrophic osteoarthopathy (PHO) which evolved into secondary hypertrophic osteoarthopathy (SHO) under the influence of bronchogenic carcinoma. The patients had a clinical picture of primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy but without any signs of disease activity until in the last several months when a malignant bronchopulmonary condition developed. This activated all the symptoms: joint swelling; enlarged fingers and distal forearms and legs; moist palms and soles; unpleasant odour of perspiration; and deeper folds of the forehead and nasolabial furrow. A bone scan showed increased accumulation of the radioisotope in specific regions of the skeleton. To our knowledge, no similar cases have been described in the literature.
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ranking = 1
keywords = osteoarthropathy, finger
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2/12. Postchemotherapeutic reversibility of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a patient with bronchogenic adenocarcinoma.

    A 54-year-old man with bronchogenic adenocarcinoma had features of the hypertrophic osteoarthropathy syndrome. The syndrome is treated by surgical resection of the primary tumor, with rapid remission of the symptoms within 24 hours after surgery. In the case reported here, the tumor (T3N3M0) could not be resected. Clinical and scintigraphic regression of the hypertrophic osteoarthropathy was evident after chemotherapy. Bone scintigraphy is valuable when determining a patient's response to treatment for this paraneoplastic syndrome.
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ranking = 1.199941481564
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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3/12. lung cancer with skin metastases.

    Skin metastases in the fingertips were the first-presenting symptom of a still occult, giant-cell bronchial carcinoma. We report the presentation, diagnosis and clinical course.
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ranking = 4.8765363365792E-5
keywords = finger
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4/12. Presymptomatic diagnosis of bronchogenic carcinoma associated with bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferation.

    A 62-year-old man presented with bilateral diffuse uveal melanocytic proliferations (BDUMP) and painful flexor contractures of the fingers of both hands. All these features were considered paraneoplastic but extensive and repeated investigations revealed no underlying malignancy. Oral steroids and orbital radiotherapy were ineffective. The diagnosis was confirmed by trans-scleral biopsy of the right choroid. Rapidly progressive cataracts were treated by phacoemulsification. Severe exudative retinal detachment with rubeosis and neovascular glaucoma in the left eye were treated successfully by partial choroidectomy. Fifteen months after presentation, investigations detected a 22 mm, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was resected without complication. The ocular tumours in both eyes regressed, without improvement in vision of light perception, and the palmar fasciitis also improved. The patient remained free of tumour recurrence until sudden death from myocardial infarction five years after he first presented.
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ranking = 4.8765363365792E-5
keywords = finger
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5/12. Clubbed fingers: indicators of serious disease.

    Clubbed fingers were noted by a dentist in a woman patient having respiratory symptoms. He referred her to a physician to be examined for pulmonary disease. Bronchogenic carcinoma was diagnosed.
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ranking = 0.00024382681682896
keywords = finger
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6/12. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, phalangeal and synovial metastases associated with bronchogenic carcinoma.

    A 61-year-old woman with bronchogenic carcinoma simultaneously developed hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA), phalangeal metastases, and metastatic carcinoma of the synovium. The right knee synovium showed several blood vessels containing carcinomatous cells. Although the association of HOA phalangeal and synovial metastases in this case is likely a chance occurrence, awareness of this possibility is extremely valuable as it has important therapeutic implications.
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ranking = 0.99995123463663
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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7/12. Phalangeal metastasis: first clinical sign of bronchogenic carcinoma.

    A 67-year-old man without any pulmonary symptoms had a swollen and tender finger initially treated as infection. It was later found to be a metastatic lesion from an undetected bronchogenic carcinoma.
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ranking = 4.8765363365792E-5
keywords = finger
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8/12. Metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma masquerading as a felon.

    This report describes a rare occurrence of a subcutaneous metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma to the distal fingertip. The original clinical presentation suggested an infectious process. Subsequent roentgenograms, sterile cultures, and positive biopsy material revealed that the lesion started as a subcutaneous metastasis that secondarily involved adjacent bone. amputation of the digit was performed.
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ranking = 4.8765363365792E-5
keywords = finger
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9/12. Multiple telangiectases preceding the appearance of undifferentiated bronchogenic carcinoma.

    A patient with undifferentiated bronchogenic carcinoma, which was preceded by skin manifestations, namely telangiectases on the palms, soles, fingers, toes, lips and tongue, is described. It is possible that these multiple vascular lesions are one of the cutaneous markers of internal malignancy.
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ranking = 4.8765363365792E-5
keywords = finger
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10/12. Reversible autonomic neuropathy and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a patient with bronchogenic carcinoma.

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the lung with pandysautonomia and pulmonary osteoarthropathy. Surgical resection of the tumor followed by radiation therapy for the residual tumor resulted in complete resolution of arthropathy and almost complete recovery from autonomic dysfunction. The symptoms of arthropathy and autonomic neuropathy recurred simultaneously several months later with increase in the tumor mass as confirmed at second surgical exploration. The second thoracotomy revealed an inoperable tumor. Following the second thoracotomy, while the arthropathy was relieved, the autonomic neuropathy persisted. We concluded that autonomic neuropathy is related to the tumor mass, and pulmonary osteoarthropathy and autonomic neuropathy are probably caused by different mechanisms, as yet undefined.
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ranking = 1.199941481564
keywords = osteoarthropathy
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