Cases reported "Carcinoma, Hepatocellular"

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1/100. cryosurgery for unresectable primary hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report and review of literature.

    Primary liver cancers are a significant cause of both morbidity and mortality. Although surgical resection remains the treatment of choice for these tumors, only 10 to 20 per cent of the primary liver tumors are found to be resectable. Presently, the options for these patients include liver transplantation, cryosurgery, or nonsurgical therapy, such as transarterial chemoembolization. Techniques such as alcohol injection, interstitial radiotherapy, laser hypothermia, and radiofrequency electrodissection have all been attempted with limited success. We present a case of a 68-year-old woman with a 10-year history of liver cirrhosis secondary to chronic active hepatitis c. A lateral segmentectomy was recommended but could not be done due to severe underlying cirrhosis. cryosurgery aided by intraoperative ultrasonography was performed successfully. The patient developed recurrent disease at 58 months and died with disease at 62 months. Advances in instrumentation and intraoperative ultrasonography are making cryosurgery a viable surgical therapeutic alternative in the management of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. The procedure can be performed safely with low morbidity.
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2/100. Surgical management for lymph node recurrence of resected fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLHCC), which is quite uncommon in japan, is known to be frequently associated with lymph node metastasis in Western countries. Herein, we describe a case of a 25 year-old Japanese woman with recurrent FLHCC in the lymph nodes after undergoing right hepatic lobectomy. She underwent a second operation for removal of a recurrent celiac lymph node tumor 23 months after the initial operation. In japan, the frequency of lymph node metastasis in ordinary hepatocellular carcinoma is only 1.6%, whereas 3 out of 9 (33%) reported domestic FLHCCs including this case had lymph node metastasis. The surgical management of lymph node metastasis in FLHCC is discussed.
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3/100. Recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma successfully treated with radiofrequency thermal ablation.

    We report a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who was successfully treated with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA). A 71-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in August 1996 with recurrence of HCC. Partial hepatic resection had been performed in January 1993 for HCC that had measured 1.3 cm in segment VIII, and subsequently he had received six sessions of percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) for treatment of recurrence. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) performed in August 1996 showed two recurrent tumors, one measuring 3.8 cm in segment VIII adjacent to the right hepatic vein, and one measuring 2.0 cm in segment V. Three sessions of percutaneous RFA were performed. After this treatment, most of the tumor in segment VIII and all the tumor in segment V showed low density on dynamic CT, and the right hepatic vein was preserved. However, a remnant of the mass appeared near the right hepatic vein 2 months after the treatment. An additional two sessions of RFA were performed. After the end of treatment, serum alpha-fetoprotein level dropped to the normal range, and no sign of recurrence has been observed until September 1998.
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4/100. Percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy for superficial hepatocellular carcinoma.

    We report a 67 year-old man with residual hepatocellular carcinoma after arterial embolization therapy, which was located on both the anterior and inferior surfaces of segment 6 of the liver. Percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy could be performed safely and the treated tumor became non-enhancing on contrast computed tomography. Two years after treatment, the tumor remains non-enhancing on contrast computed tomography and has decreased in size. Percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy appears to be useful even in patients who have superficial liver tumors associated with cirrhosis.
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5/100. Generalized intraperitoneal seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma after microwave coagulation therapy: a case report.

    We first describe a case of generalized intraperitoneal seeding of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after microwave coagulation therapy (MCT). A 61 year-old man underwent operative MCT for an exophytic HCC, 60 mm in diameter, in segment IV of his cirrhotic liver. Despite successful tumor ablation, the serum alpha-fetoprotein levels continuously rose after MCT. Five months later, radiographic examinations delineated several perihepatic masses with hypervascularity, and the patient presented with constipation. At the second laparotomy, there were numerous small peritoneal metastases involving the entire peritoneal cavity and slightly bloody ascites. An omental mass, 50 mm in diameter, involved the transverse colon. Most of these intraabdominal masses were removed together with the involved colon. Histologically, the initial tumor was a moderately differentiated HCC, and the peritoneal masses were poorly differentiated HCCs. The patient died of rapid tumor progression and bleeding 2 months later. In conclusion, we should be aware of the possible occurrence of peritoneal seeding after MCT for HCC. Every effort should be made to prevent this serious complication, particularly in cases of superficial, large, and less differentiated HCCs.
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ranking = 2795.7392353677
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6/100. A case of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma treated with laparoscopic microwave coagulation therapy after minimally invasive hepatic surgery.

    A case of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in which the patient repeatedly underwent minimally invasive hepatic procedures is reported. The patient was a 71-year-old man who underwent transthoracic microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) for initial HCC nodules in segment VIII and subsequent laparoscopic MCT for small intrahepatic recurrent nodules in the left hepatic lobe. At this writing, the patient was alive and well without tumor recurrence 29 months after the initial surgery. Minimally invasive hepatic surgery alleviates perihepatic adhesion and allows subsequent laparoscopic surgery in the case of intrahepatic HCC recurrence.
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7/100. A long-term survivor undergoing extensive microwave coagulation for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Surgery for advanced hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) has not been standardized. We report on a long-term tumor-free survivor who underwent extensive microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) for multiple bilobar HCCs. A 61 year-old woman was diagnosed to have bilobar HCCs, including a large tumor, 9 cm in diameter, and 4 small satellite nodules, associated with chronic hepatitis b. The patient had received repeated chemoembolizations using iodized oil, but the increased alpha-fetoprotein level did not fall to normal. The main tumor was unresectable because the tumor involved the caval vein and hepatic veins. The patient underwent extensive MCT with a total of 134 electrode insertions. The paracaval portion of the main tumor was meticulously coagulated under sonographic guidance to avoid vascular injury. The post-operative course was uneventful. Post-operative computed tomography (CT) showed complete necrosis of all tumors. The patient is alive without tumor recurrence for 4 years after MCT. This case proves that extensive MCT can provide a chance of cure in selected patients with multiple bilobar HCCs and centrally located HCCs near the caval vein.
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ranking = 2795.7392353677
keywords = microwave
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8/100. Synchronous wilms tumor and fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma: report of a case.

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FHCC) is a unique histologic variant of HCC that occurs in a younger subset of patients than classical HCC, and is associated with a better prognosis. wilms tumor (WT) is a malignant embryonal neoplasm of the kidney and is one of the most common solid tumors of childhood, occurring at an estimated frequency of 1 in 8000 to 10,000 births. Although second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) following therapy for WTs have been reported in the liver, the coexistence of HCC and WT is extremely rare. We present the first report of a synchronous anaplastic WT and FHCC in a previously healthy 4-year-old girl. Despite the presence of focal immunohistochemical positivity for p53 in the WT, molecular analysis failed to reveal a germline or somatic p53 mutation, and was inconclusive in establishing a clonal relation between the two tumors.
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9/100. portal vein thrombosis caused by microwave coagulation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: report of a case.

    Microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) is one of the treatment modalities for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 67-year-old man with liver cirrhosis underwent MCT during a laparotomy for a deeply located HCC (2.5 cm in diameter) at the border of the anterior and posterior segments of the right hepatic lobe. Two weeks after MCT, he complained of abdominal fullness. portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was diagnosed because he had massive ascites and an echogenic mass in the portal vein on abdominal ultrasonography. PVT was successfully treated by fibrinolytic therapy with a selective infusion of urokinase via the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). There have been few reports on PVT as a complication of MCT. attention should be paid to the possible occurrence of PVT as a critical complication after MCT for liver tumors adjacent to the portal vein. Fibrinolytic therapy via the SMA is thus considered to be an effective approach for PVT after MCT.
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ranking = 2236.5913882941
keywords = microwave
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10/100. Hepatocellular carcinoma in autoimmune hepatitis.

    To determine if hepatocellular carcinoma can develop in autoimmune hepatitis in the absence of viral infection and to assess its frequency, liver tissue removed at hepatectomy was tested for HBV dna and HCV rna in one patient and the frequency of hepatocellular carcinoma was determined in 212 other uniformly followed individuals. The liver tissue from the propositus was uninfected and only one patient (0.5%) in the cohort undergoing routine follow-up developed malignancy during 1,732 patient-years of observation. Only one of 88 patients with cirrhosis (1%) developed hepatocellular carcinoma during 1,002 patient-years of observation after cirrhosis (mean, 123 /- 9 months) and of the 65 patients with histological cirrhosis for at least five years, only one developed carcinoma during 162 /- 8 months (incidence, 1 per 965 patient-years). We conclude that hepatocellular carcinoma can develop in autoimmune hepatitis in the absence of viral infection. Its occurrence is rare and only in long-standing cirrhosis.
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