Cases reported "Carcinoma, Papillary"

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1/180. False-positive result of a total-body scan caused by benign thyroidal tissue after I-131 ablation.

    This case report illustrates a false-positive result of an I-131 total-body scan caused by abnormal, noncancerous thyroid tissue. A 39-year-old woman underwent an open biopsy and thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. She was treated by ablation with 150.8 mCi I-131. A follow-up total-body scan revealed a solitary focus of increased activity near the midline at the upper border of the larynx that was subsequently excised. Histologic analysis indicated a fragment of thyroid tissue with chronic inflammation, fibrosis, and squamous metaplasia. No evidence of thyroid carcinoma was present. Hypofunctioning or nonfunctioning residual tissue within the thyroglossal duct may have been suppressed under euthyroid conditions, protecting it from ablation. This tissue may have become stimulated by the high thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, accumulating I-131 and producing a false-positive result of the scan.
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2/180. Papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the breast: a report of five cases with distinction from eccrine acrospiroma.

    Papillary carcinomas of the female breast exhibit a spectrum of morphologic appearances and might be mistaken for benign intraductal papillary lesions or papillary adnexal neoplasms. We report herein five cases of papillary carcinoma in which the epithelium closely resembled transitional cells of the urinary bladder. Grossly, the tumors had a nodular or papillary appearance, white, tan, or red in color. The microscopic features were those of an intraductal papillary proliferation of solid layers of epithelial cells overlying fibrovascular cores. The proliferating cells assumed a whorled or streaming growth pattern, with flattening of superficial cells. One case showed microinvasion. Comparison with a similar number of cases of the solid variant of papillary carcinoma of the breast showed a greater range of nuclear pleomorphism, mitotic counts, and a more varied immunohistochemical profile in the papillary carcinomas with transitional cell features. Eight cases of eccrine acrospiroma occurring in the female breast also displayed a solid or solid papillary pattern, with flattened superficial cells. These occurred in a younger age group, were located in the dermis or subcutis, and usually had zones of clear cells visible at low magnification. No evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease was found in the four patients for whom follow-up was available; the length of follow-up ranged from 18 months to 11 years. The stimulus for the development of this unusual phenotype is unclear, but the transitional-like variant seems to behave in a fashion similar to that of other types of papillary carcinoma of the breast. Distinction of this malignant lesion from various benign lesions that occur in the same region is mandatory.
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3/180. Quadruple cancer including bilateral breasts, Vater's papilla, and urinary bladder: report of a case.

    We herein report a rare case of quadruple carcinoma with heterochronous bilateral breast cancer, cancer of Vater's papilla, and cancer of the urinary bladder, which were all curatively resected. A 62-year-old woman previously underwent right and left modified radical mastectomies heterochronously. Recently, a dilatation of the lower bile duct, diagnosed as cancer of Vater's papilla, was resected by a pancreatoduodenectomy. hematuria during surgery led to the discovery of a solid bladder tumor. The tumor was resected by a transurethral resection. The histopathologic findings differed for all four lesions. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and to date has shown no recurrence.
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4/180. radiation myelopathy with partial functional recovery: PET evidence of long-term increased metabolic activity of the spinal cord.

    Postoperative telecobalt irradiation was performed with a biologically effective extrapolated response dose of 165 Gy2 delivered to the spinal cord of a papillary thyroid cancer patient. Incomplete cervical transection developed, followed by a gradual functional improvement, which is still continuing 8 years after radiotherapy. Between the 6th and 8th years of the clinical course, positron emission tomography investigations demonstrated an increased 18F-deoxyglucose accumulation and (15)O-butanol perfusion, but negligible 11C-methionine uptake in the irradiated spinal cord segment. We suggest that the increased metabolism and perfusion, and the lack of detectable protein synthesis may be related to the increased energy demands of action potential conduction, due to the higher than normal density of sodium channels along demyelinated axons displaying restored conduction.
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5/180. Reduction mammaplasty followed by development of a bilateral non-synchronous carcinoma of the breast.

    Case report of a woman who at the age of 26 underwent mammary reduction (strmbeck) for macromastia. A primary bilateral non-synchronous carcinoma of the breast was discovered 20 months and 5 years after the plastic surgery. On pathological examination lymph node metastases were not found in both instances. There was a positive family history of the occurrence of carcinoma. mammography prior to mammary reduction is recommended.
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6/180. Intraductal papillary carcinoma of the parotid gland with low malignancy.

    A peculiar case of papillary carcinoma arising in the parotid gland is reported. A 68-year-old woman presented with a right, painless, parotid mass, measuring approximately 3 cm in greatest diameter. A conservative parotidectomy was performed. Histologically, the neoplasm showed exophytic papillary projections into a cavity. The cells were focally suggestive of epidermoidal differentiation, whereas a transitional differentiation was noted in other portions, as in bladder papilloma. Immunohistochemical studies showed strong positivity of the neoplastic cells for cytokeratin and weak positivity for PCNA and Mib-1. We classified this neoplasm among the papillary tumors with a low-grade of malignancy.
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7/180. Observations on the histopathologic diagnosis of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast.

    Our histopathologic criteria for diagnosing microinvasive carcinoma of the breast may be enunciated as follows: (1) cytologically malignant cells in the stroma associated with in situ carcinoma, (2) absence of basement membrane and myoepithelial cells around the invasive cells, (3) frequent accompanying stromal alterations in the form of myxomatous change and loosening of connective tissue, and (4) the frequent presence of an inflammatory cell infiltrate composed of lymphocytes and plasma cells. Most or all of these four features are present in cases of ductal microinvasive carcinoma of the breast, but the lobular type is not likely to be accompanied by stromal changes or a lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltrate. The minimum information regarding microinvasive carcinoma of the breast that should be conveyed in the final pathology report includes size as measured by the ocular micrometer or a statement that microinvasion refers to a lesion smaller than 1 mm, the number of foci of invasion, and the spatial distribution of the invasive foci. The nuclear grade of the invasive cells and the size, type, and nuclear grade of the accompanying DCIS should be specified. The status of margins, presence of vascular channel involvement (a rarity in microinvasive carcinoma of the breast), and degree of proliferative changes in adjacent nonneoplastic breast tissue should be reported. Immunostains for basement membrane and myoepithelial cells may be helpful in the diagnosis of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast. Sclerosing lesions such as radial scar and sclerosing adenosis can simulate microinvasive carcinoma of the breast, especially when the latter is associated with in situ carcinoma. Caution should be exercised in cases wherein in situ malignant cells may be dislodged by needling procedures or during dissection of the excised specimen. cautery-induced artifacts also hinder optimal histologic assessment. In some cases, it is virtually impossible to determine if true invasion is present, and the statement "microinvasive carcinoma of the breast cannot be entirely excluded" may be employed as a last resort. We consider the latter diagnosis to be the last refuge of the diligent pathologist and do not recommend it unless all diagnostic measures, including examination of deeper levels and supplemental stains, have been exhausted. It may be necessary to seek an expert opinion in "difficult" cases, particularly in the event that therapeutic decisions are to be based on the determination of invasion. From a clinical perspective, the management of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast ought to be dictated by the individual circumstances in each case. Based on currently available data, which admittedly suffer from lack of diagnostic uniformity, the vast majority of patients with microinvasive carcinoma of the breast will be node-negative and can look forward to an excellent prognosis. It is hoped that since the UICC has adopted a previously recommended definition of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast, prospective or retrospective studies with uniform diagnostic criteria will be conducted that will enable more definitive conclusions regarding the treatment and prognosis of microinvasive carcinoma of the breast.
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ranking = 2
keywords = duct
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8/180. Prostatic cancer with huge cystic degeneration.

    This report details a case of prostatic cancer associated with cystic degeneration. A cystic mass may occur in the pelvis for various reasons. A congenital cyst is associated with an abnormality in the paramesonephric (mullerian) duct or mesonephric (wolffian) duct. An acquired cyst can be classified into three main types, retention, malignant and parasitic, however a cyst accompanying prostatic cancer is rare. In this particular case the size of the cyst under imaging was approximately 15 cm in diameter; this makes it one of the largest among those previously reported.
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9/180. Double cancer of the gallbladder and common bile duct associated with an anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal junction without a choledochal cyst: report of a case.

    We report herein the case of a 37-year-old woman found to have double cancer of the gallbladder and common bile duct associated with an anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal junction (APBDJ) without a choledochal cyst (CC). Abdominal ultrasonography showed an isoechoic mass in the gallbladder, and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tubography revealed incomplete obstruction in the upper portion of the common bile duct and APBDJ. The patient underwent cholecystectomy, partial hepatic resection, pancreatoduodenectomy, and portal vein reconstruction. Pathological examination of the tumors from the gallbladder and bile duct revealed papillary carcinoma and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, respectively, and direct continuity was not observed between the tumors. A review of the literature on six cases of multiple primary carcinoma of the biliary tract associated with APBDJ without CC is presented following this case report. Double cancer of the biliary tract was found synchronously in five patients and metachronously in one. gallbladder cancer showed subserosal invasion in four patients, while bile duct cancer invaded the pancreas in one patient and reached the serosa in two patients. Considering the potential for cancer to arise in the biliary tract and the difficulties associated with monitoring it, cholecystectomy and resection of the extrahepatic common bile duct may be the most appropriate treatment for patients with an APBDJ without a CC.
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ranking = 14
keywords = duct
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10/180. Papillary thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the pituitary gland.

    Many malignancies may present with metastases to the pituitary gland. The association of thyroid carcinoma with pituitary metastases is, however, very rare. This report describes two patients in whom metastases from a papillary thyroid carcinoma to the pituitary gland resulted in panhypopituitarism with blunted endogenous thyrotropin (TSH) production following withdrawal of levothyroxine. Both required the use of recombinant human TSH prior to radioiodine therapy. Symptoms of hypopituitarism may be difficult to distinguish clinically from those of hypothyroidism in the setting of levothyroxine withdrawal. Clinicians should be aware of the clinical and biochemical manifestations of this rare association.
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