Cases reported "Carcinoma, Renal Cell"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/430. Complete response of a large brain metastasis of renal cell cancer to interferon-alpha: case report.

    BACKGROUND: interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is a drug widely used in the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancers, especially lung lesions. Successful treatment using IFNalpha for histologically proven brain metastasis has not been reported. CASE REPORT: A large pineal tumor was found in a 51-year-old man with renal cell cancer in the left kidney. The histological diagnosis of biopsied specimens was a brain metastasis from renal cell cancer. The patient was treated with intramuscular injections of IFNalpha. The brain metastasis gradually decreased in size and disappeared completely 6 months after the initial injection of IFNalpha. The IFNalpha therapy was continued for 9 months. Fifteen months later, no recurrence was evident on brain magnetic resonance imaging. CONCLUSION: This is an extremely rare case in which the long-term use of IFNalpha induced a complete response of a brain metastasis from renal cell cancer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/430. Primary tumor of the ureteral stump following a nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma.

    BACKGROUND: A 64-year-old man presented with asymptomatic macroscopic hematuria during a follow up for a localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which was treated by a right radical nephrectomy 6 years earlier. methods: x-rays and a ureteroscopic examination revealed multiple papillary tumors filling the right ureteral stump. Surgery was performed to excise the ureteral stump and bladder cuff. The tumor was histologically a grade 2-3 transitional cell carcinoma without muscle invasion. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: Only four patients with a ureteral stump carcinoma, including the present case, have been reported after a nephrectomy for RCC. Considering that this patient had a past history of multiple cancers, genetic or environmental factors may have contributed to the etiology of the ureteral stump tumor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/430. A rare combination consisting of primary hyperaldosteronism and glucagonoma.

    A 59-yr-old man with multiple pancreatic tumors is presented. Previously, he had undergone left adrenalectomy for primary hyperaldosteronism and left nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma at the ages of 39 and 55 yr, respectively. This time, 3 yr after removal of renal cancer, two solid lesions in the pancreas associated with hyperglucagonemia were detected. Under a diagnosis of pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma or islet cell tumor of the pancreas, distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and enucleation of the tumor in the pancreas head were performed. Microscopically, a glucagonoma, measuring 2.3 mm in diameter, was detected among five pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma. Four years after surgery, the patient remains well, without signs of recurrence despite multiple pancreatic metastases. This is the first report of such a rare combination consisting of aldosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma and glucagonoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/430. Surgical treatment for metastatic lung tumors with incidentally coexisting lung cancer.

    We report four surgically resected cases of a metastatic lung tumors with incidentally coexisting lung cancer. Two patients (Cases 1 and 2) were admitted for surgical treatment for pulmonary metastases from colon cancer, and the other two (Cases 3 and 4) were for pulmonary metastases from renal cell carcinoma. In only one patient (Case 3), one lesion among the multiple shadows on the preoperative computed tomography examination was rather strongly suspected to be primary lung cancer. In three patients (Cases 1, 2 and 3), one of the resected lesions in each individual case was diagnosed as lung adenocarcinoma by an intraoperative examination using frozen sections, and was later histologically confirmed. In Case 4, one of the resected lesions was postoperatively determined to be lung adenocarcinoma. All coexisting lung cancers, treated with partial resection of the lung, were well-differentiated small-sized adenocarcinoma (T1N0), while the other lesions resected in each case were metastases from the individual cancer. Problems in preoperative diagnosis and surgical treatment for metastatic lung tumors with incidentally coexisting lung cancer are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/430. Collecting duct meningeal carcinomatosis.

    Collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) is an aggressive primary renal neoplasm that represents a distinct subtype of renal cell carcinoma. Histochemical (eg, mucicarmine) and immunohistochemical (eg, ulex europaeus) studies, taken in concert with the gross and histologic findings, allow differentiation of CDC from the conventional varieties of renal cell carcinoma in most cases. Collecting duct carcinoma generally pursues a more aggressive course than conventional renal cell carcinoma. Metastases to regional lymph nodes, bone, adrenal glands, lung, and skin have been reported in CDC. We describe the case of a 26-year-old man who presented with a clinical and radiologic impression of multifocal meningioma. Biopsies of the meninges and extracranial soft tissues revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma; subsequent studies suggested metastatic CDC. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was performed on a subsequently identified renal mass, which showed features consistent with CDC. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of meningeal carcinomatosis due to CDC. The diagnostic features of this tumor are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.082628249244994
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/430. Oncocytoid renal cell carcinoma after neuroblastoma: a report of four cases of a distinct clinicopathologic entity.

    Four children who developed oncocytoid renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after neuroblastoma are reported. One patient had multiple, bilateral RCCs. The mean age at time of diagnosis of RCC was 8.8 years (range, 5-13 years). The mean interval between neuroblastoma and RCC was 7.15 years (range, 3.1-11.5 years). The histologic findings of these RCCs did not fit within the spectrum of known renal epithelial neoplasms. Most of the neoplastic cells in all cases had eosinophilic, oncocytoid cytoplasm and were arranged in solid and papillary growth patterns. A subset of cells with reticular cytoplasm was also present. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated keratins 8 and 18 in all neoplasms and keratin 20 in two cases. dna ploidy analysis revealed that two of three neoplasms assessed were aneuploid. Cytogenetic studies revealed 45, XX, add or dup (7)(q32q36) in one neoplasm, and 83-89, XXXX, -1 ,-3, del (3)(q11.1q2?1), der(4)t(4;?22) (q32;q11.2), -14, -22 in a second tumor. Microsatellite polymerase chain reaction analysis detected no abnormalities in one neoplasm and allelic imbalance of chromosomes 2p31-32.2, 8p22, 9p22-24, 13q22, 20q13, and 22q11 in a second tumor. In case 4, two different RCCs excised 6 months apart were analyzed. The initial neoplasm showed allelic imbalance of chromosomes 2q31-32.2, 5q22, 5q31, 10p13-14, 13q22, 14q31, and 20q13. The subsequent neoplasm showed allelic imbalance of chromosomes 3p21.3, 14q31, and 20q13. The common presence of 14q31 and 20q13 abnormalities suggests that these two neoplasms were genetically related. In aggregate, these findings are distinctive, are not found in known types of RCC, and support the morphologic impression that oncocytoid RCC after neuroblastoma is a distinct clinicopathologic entity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.66102599395995
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/430. Cutaneous lesions of metastatic visceral malignancy mimicking pyogenic granuloma.

    Cutaneous metastases may be the first sign of a previously undiagnosed visceral malignancy or the initial presentation of a recurrent neoplasm. Rarely, skin metastases can resemble a pyogenic granuloma. Three oncology patients who developed new pyogenic granuloma-like cutaneous lesions are described. Histopathologic examination showed metastatic visceral malignancy in the skin. The characteristics of the previously reported cancer patients with metastatic tumor to the skin that mimicked a pyogenic granuloma are reviewed. A biopsy of a skin lesion that clinically appears to represent a pyogenic granuloma should be performed for microscopic examination in patients with a previous visceral malignancy or in cancer-free individuals whose lesions do not resolve after conservative treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33262824924499
keywords = cancer, neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/430. Concurrent occurrence of three neoplasms including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, renal cell carcinoma and leiomyoma in the same kidney.

    A 53-year-old man with triple renal neoplasms in his left kidney presented. He was initially diagnosed intermediate grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) which involved gastrointestinal tract, left kidney, liver and pancreas. He underwent left nefrectomy because of a persistent renal mass after the completion of chemotherapy. The large renal mass revealed a renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Additionally, multiple small nodules of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and a solitary leiomyoma were observed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.41314124622497
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/430. Comparative microsatellite analysis in discerning origin of disseminated tumor: the case of a patient with malignant ascites and a history of multiple tumors.

    The origin of metastatic carcinoma is now always easily resolved on the basis of conventional dinical and pathological parameters, particularly in patients with more than 1 primary tumor. When 1 of the tumors is a renal cell carcinoma, the clinical picture is further confounded by the tendency of these tumors to be locally silent, to metastasize to unusual sites, and to disseminate long after removal of the primary tumor. We compared tumors for loss (ie, deletion) of loci on chromosomal arms 3p, 5q, 11q, and 18q in a patient with a malignant ascites fluid, a remote history of renal and colonic neoplasms, and a strong clinical suspicion of disseminated gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma. dna from microdissected tumors and normal tissues was subjected to polymerase chain reaction-based microsatellite analysis. Even though the clinical picture suggested a gastrointestinal origin, comparison of genetic alterations clearly showed that the malignant ascites represented recurrence of the renal cell carcinoma. The malignant ascites and the primary renal cell carcinoma showed identical patterns of allelic loss at all loci tested. In contrast, the malignant ascites and colonic adenoma showed discordant patterns of allelic loss. Comparative microsatellite analysis provides a rapid genetic approach for discerning the origin of metastatic tumor spread. This may be a useful diagnostic adjunct when tumor origin is not clear on clinical or morphological grounds. In some instances, it may even provide a reasonable alternative to an extensive and costly conventional work-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.082628249244994
keywords = neoplasm
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/430. Renal metastasis from prostatic adenocarcinoma: a potential diagnostic pitfall.

    We report a case of renal metastases from prostate cancer to show that the possibility of tumor metastasis, although rare, should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of renal mass.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.125
keywords = cancer
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Carcinoma, Renal Cell'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.