Cases reported "Cardiomyopathies"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/14. A case study of Jerry: emphasizing team communication through use of the Discipline.

    After the chaplain is well acquainted with The Discipline and has begun to implement it in daily pastoral practice, half of the work is done. The further work concerns how and what to communicate to the care team regarding the chaplain's observations. This article begins by offering a pastoral reflection on the chaplain's identity and pastoral practice within a multi-disciplinary care team. The pastoral reflection highlights key theological assertions used by The Discipline. The author then identifies the particular problems facing care teams and their communication that the chaplain can anticipate when using The Discipline. Thirdly, the author suggests workable, theologically based tools for the resolution of these problems. Lastly, through the case study of "Jerry," the author illustrates both the "how" and "what" components of care team communication using the working elements of The Discipline. The "how" component describes the informal and formal relational processes that have contributed to a working partnership. The case study also illustrates the "what" part of care team communication--the structure and delivery of observable and discernible content to physicians and nurses. These materials can ease the transition towards effective pastoral presence on the interdisciplinary care team regarding patient and family/support partner care.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/14. Acquired coronary-to-left ventricle fistula: evidence by myocardial contrast echocardiography.

    The case report subject is a patient with an old anteroseptal myocardial infarction and postinfarction angina who developed, over the years, a small left coronary-to-left ventricle fistula. The first coronary angiogram, performed 4 months after the infarction, was negative for coronary fistula. The diagnosis was made 3 years later, at repeat cardiac catheterization with myocardial contrast echocardiography. Left and right coronary injections of 0.2 cc of sonicated 5% human albumin microbubbles generated a bright cloud of contrast entering the left ventricular cavity at the level of the distal third of the interventricular septum. Conversely, cineangiography failed to show on-line the fistulous communication that was evident only after careful cineangiographic reviewing. This case demonstrates the high efficacy of myocardial contrast echocardiography in identifying very small coronary fistulae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/14. Persistent left superior vena cava-inferior vena caval communication complicating implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    A persistent left superior vena cava has been observed in 0.3% of the general population on autopsy. Its presence can complicate left-sided device implantation. Commonly, a LSVC connects to the right atrium via the coronary sinus. A LSVC-accessory hemiazygous-hemiazygous-inferior vena caval communication has not been described previously. The presence of such a congenital venous anomaly will prohibit a left-sided device implant.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/14. An acquired interatrial fistula secondary to para-aortic abscess documented by transesophageal echocardiography.

    Para-aortic ring abscess and resulting fistulous communication between adjacent structures frequently occur in prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis but are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. We report a patient who had an abscess involving the aortic-mitral intervalvular fibrosa that eroded into the interatrial septum, causing an interatrial communication with a left-to-right shunt. The abscess was detected by transthoracic echocardiography, but the fistula was only seen by the subsequent transesophageal echocardiogram. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an interatrial fistula secondary to a para-aortic valve abscess and its diagnosis preoperatively. Transesophageal echocardiography should be performed in any patient suspected to have complicated aortic endocarditis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/14. Primary lipid cardiomyopathy.

    In this communication, we describe an isolated, apparently congenital cardiomyopathy (CMP) characterized by the accumulation of stainable lipid in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes. This lesion, which we term primary lipid cardiomyopathy, has not been reported so far. The structural alteration was associated with progressive heart failure, leading to death at the age of 3 years, and with massive hypertrophy of myocardium. Lipid storage in heart muscle cells resulted in an impressive yellow to orange color of the myocardium. We suggest that this type of primary CMP may represent a new member within the group of mitochondrial CMPs. Possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/14. Congenital aneurysm of the left coronary sinus and left main coronary artery with fistulous communication to the right atrium in pregnancy.

    We describe a unique case of a left coronary arteriovenous fistula arising from a left sinus of valsalva aneurysm in a pregnant woman. The relevant diagnostic contributions of two-dimensional echocardiography, color flow Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging, and angiography are discussed. The hemodynamic manifestations of this anomaly in pregnancy and the eventual surgical correction are reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/14. Multiple coronary artery-left ventricular fistulas: a pattern of anomalous coronary microvascularization.

    Fistulas between the coronary artery and the left heart chambers are exceptionally rare, especially those emptying into the left ventricle. We know of 33 cases of coronary artery-left ventricular fistulas reported in the literature, 7 of which had multiple communications. The findings in 6 additional patients with multiple coronary artery-left ventricular fistulas are reported. Three of the 6 patients from all three major coronary arteries. It is important to recognize this anomaly as it may be the source of angina in patients without angiographic evidence of major atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/14. Redistribution on the thallium scan in myocardial sarcoidosis: concise communication.

    Resting and redistribution thallium studies were performed in four young patients with sarcoidosis to evaluate the possibility of myocardial involvement. In each case the resting scan showed marked defects that resolved on the redistribution studies. In a different patient population, these results would have implied significant coronary artery disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/14. Left ventricular outflow tract pulmonary artery fistula in endocarditis.

    patients with infective endocarditis are at risk for the development of a fistulous communication between chambers or great vessels of the heart. The presence of a continuous murmur may suggest the diagnosis. The first case of aortic valve endocarditis complicated by the development of a fistulous communication between the left ventricular outflow tract and the pulmonary artery is reported. Transesophageal Doppler echocardiography did not detect the defect preoperatively. However, pulmonary artery catheterization revealed very high mixed venous oxygen saturation which supported the presence of a left-to-right shunt.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/14. Atrioventricular fistula: an unusual complication of endomyocardial biopsy in a heart transplant recipient.

    Endomyocardial biopsy remains the primary method for diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection. Generally, endomyocardial biopsy is considered a relatively safe procedure in heart transplant recipients. Complications that have been reported are related to catheter insertion and include carotid arterial puncture, prolonged bleeding, vasovagal reaction, ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and transient conduction abnormalities. Serious complications such as right ventricular perforation with cardiac tamponade may also occur. Most complications are usually without significant long-term sequelae. This report describes an unusual case of atrioventricular fistula between the right atrium and left ventricle that occurred during a routine endomyocardial biopsy in a heart transplant recipient. Sudden hemodynamic compromise developed in this patient soon after heart biopsy associated with hemodynamic picture of high-output heart failure. Right heart catheterization, including oximetry, peripheral venous contrast echocardiography, color flow Doppler studies, and transesophageal echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of fistulous communication between the right atrium and left ventricle, most likely through the membranous interventricular septum. Conservative medical management resulted in striking clinical improvement within 48 hours commensurate with spontaneous closure of the right atrium-to-left ventricle fistula documented by hemodynamic and echocardiographic studies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = communication
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cardiomyopathies'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.