Cases reported "Carotid Artery Injuries"

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1/86. Traumatic dissection of the common carotid artery after blunt injury to the neck.

    BACKGROUND: Occlusive lesions of the common carotid artery (CCA) resulting from blunt injury are extremely rare, and their clinicopathologic and therapeutic features have not yet been clarified. OBJECTIVES AND RESULTS: Five patients with occlusive lesions of the CCA developed neurologic deficits at 1.5 hours to 10 years after blunt neck injury. Lesions included two complete occlusions, one severe stenosis, and two segmental intimal dissections of the CCA. In the two patients with CCA occlusion, bypass surgery was performed using a Dacron graft between the ipsilateral subclavian artery and the carotid bifurcation. In the remaining three patients, the involved segments were replaced with a Dacron graft. Surgical specimens from the early posttraumatic period revealed intimal tears with mural thrombosis and/or subintimal hematomas and those from the later period showed myointimal hyperplasia or fibrotic organization. CONCLUSION: Traumatic occlusive lesions of the CCA tend to evolve from intimal dissections to severe stenoses or occlusion, compromising cerebral circulation. The involved CCA can be diagnosed early by B-mode Doppler sonography and successfully reconstructed using a Dacron graft.
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2/86. Post-traumatic dissecting aneurysm of extracranial internal carotid artery: endovascular treatment with stenting.

    Traumatic internal carotid dissection occurs frequently in motor vehicle accidents, typically extracranially, close to the skull base. dissection may lead to stenosis or occlusion of the vessel, possibly with a pseudoaneurysm, symptoms ranging from neck pain to neurological deficits. In symptomatic patients and in cases of pseudoaneurysm, when conservative medical treatment fails, surgery or endovascular treatment are indicated. We report a post-traumatic dissecting aneurysm of the extracranial internal carotid artery successfully treated with stenting via a transfemoral approach.
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3/86. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery after shrapnel injury in World war II: demonstration by CT angiography with 3D MIP reconstruction.

    A case of pseudoaneurysm of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) after shrapnel injury is demonstrated by intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) with subtraction technique. Although the pseudoaneurysm was well demonstrated by intra-arterial DSA, CTA was the only modality to demonstrate the three-dimensional shape of the perfused part of pseudoaneurysm and the aneurysmal neck, which affected the therapeutic strategy. The CTA technique is useful in the assessment of large pseudoaneurysms and for therapeutic planning.
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4/86. Vertebral and carotid artery dissection following chiropractic cervical manipulation.

    A 50-year-old woman presented a sudden left occipital headache and a posterior circulation stroke after cervical manipulation for neck pain. Magnetic resonance imaging documented a left intracranial vertebral artery occlusive dissection associated with an ipsilateral internal carotid artery dissection with vessel stenosis in its prepetrous tract. This is the first reported case showing an associate vertebral and carotid artery dissection following cervical manipulation. Carotid dissection was asymptomatic and, therefore, its incidence may be underestimated. We emphasize that cervical manipulation should be performed only in patients without predisposing factors for artery dissection and after an appropriate diagnosis of neck pain.
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5/86. Management of penetrating injury to the petrous internal carotid artery: case report.

    We report the management of a penetrating foreign body injury to the neck with a length of fencing wire traversing the internal carotid artery within the petrous temporal bone and entering the middle cranial fossa. Discussion points include methods of haemorrhage control, as well as ligation versus repair or bypass as the definitive treatment.
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6/86. Traumatic carotid artery dissection causing blindness.

    A case of delayed postoperative visual loss due to bilateral traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented. In patients with a major craniofacial injury due to a high-speed motor vehicle accident, we suggest that carotid artery duplex ultrasonography be used in the initial evaluation for possible carotid artery dissection. magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck with magnetic resonance angiography should be performed subsequently if indicated. early diagnosis and initiation of therapy can minimize complications.
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7/86. Blunt carotid artery injury after accidental neck compression: report of a case.

    Almost all cases of carotid artery injury are precipitated by a high-energy impact such as motor vehicle accidents or gunshot wounds, and are usually diagnosed using angiography. We report herein a case of carotid artery injury induced by a low-energy insult with rare clinical signs which was diagnosed using ultrasonography as well as angiography. A 37-year-old man sustained an accidental compression of the neck and was transferred to our emergency room. Horner's syndrome and phrenic nerve palsy were detected on the left side. ultrasonography demonstrated two sites of injury with an intimal flap of the distal left common carotid artery as well as angiography. The patient was placed on anticoagulants and was discharged on the 10th hospital day with both Horner's syndrome and phrenic nerve palsy. This case suggests that surgeons should investigate any possible carotid artery injury, even after low-velocity injuries such as compression of the neck, and therefore an ultrasonic examination should be performed at the initial evaluation and at follow-up studies. In addition, further investigations are also called for to investigate the utility of anticoagulation in the treatment of carotid artery injury.
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8/86. Delayed bilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis following accidental strangulation.

    A 24-yr-old male presented after a fishing accident in which he was pulled underwater by a rope attached to a crayfish pot. He was winched out of the water with the rope still around his neck, sustaining serious neck injuries that ultimately led to his death. After initial resuscitation, he remained fully conscious for approximately 8 h, after which there was a rapid and sudden deterioration in his level of consciousness. The presentation, investigation, management and subsequent postmortem findings are presented and discussed.
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9/86. Combined carotid artery injury and laryngeal fracture secondary to dog bite: case report.

    Approximately 914 new dog bite injuries requiring emergency department visits occur daily in the united states. Attacks by dogs with training and strength to attack should be triaged cautiously because of the possibility of serious internal injury. A high index of suspicion is needed when treating patients with neck injuries secondary to dog bites. We report a case of successfully treated combined carotid artery and laryngeal injury produced by a dog bite.
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10/86. radiation injury involving the internal carotid artery. Report of two cases.

    radiation therapy is an uncommon cause of stenosis and occlusions of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA). We describe two cases of cerebral ischemia due to ICA stenosis in patients irradiated for malignant tumors (lymphoma and breast cancer). The first patient, a 32-year-old man, presented with an episode of cerebral ischemia. Six years previously he had received irradiation therapy for a left laterocervical mass histologically diagnosed at biopsy as a Hodgkin's lymphoma. cerebral angiography on entry revealed bilateral occlusion of the cervical ICA, with a 2-cm stump at the origin of the left ICA. Despite anti-platelet aggregation therapy the ischemic attacks persisted, necessitating a stumpectomy. After vascular-repair surgery the patient had no further ischemic symptoms. The second patient, a 42-year-old woman, began to experience the sudden onset of pain in the right arm and left hemiparesis five years after surgery plus irradiation (4500 rad) for breast cancer, and three years after excision of a single cerebral metastasis. cerebral angiography obtained on admission showed occlusion of the right ICA and right subclavian arteries, both lesions necessitating thrombectomy. After surgery the right radial pulse immediately re-appeared and the hemiparesis regressed. In both patients, 2-year follow-up assessment by Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) confirmed that the operated arteries remained patent. These two unusual cases underline the potential risk of irradiation-induced ischemic cerebrovascular symptoms, suggesting that patients who have received radiation therapy to the neck and mediastinum who survive for more than 5 years should undergo regular non-invasive imaging of neck vessels (Doppler ultrasonography and MRA).
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