Cases reported "Carotid Body Tumor"

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11/57. Carotid body tumors: the role of preoperative embolization.

    Resection of carotid body tumors (neck paragangliomas) carries inherent risks of injury to the cranial nerves and other structures as well excessive blood loss. Preoperative embolization has been used to lessen the morbidity in tumors that are larger than 2 cm in diameter. Two female patients presented for treatment with large asymptomatic carotid body tumors-one 4 cm and one 5 cm in diameter. Both patients had preoperative angiography the day before surgery that revealed the feeding arterial vessels so that successful embolization could be accomplished with gel. Success was judged by diminution of the angiographic blush. Both patients had an uneventful surgical excision the following day with the carotid body tumors being able to be resected periadventitially without damage to either the external or internal carotid artery. The cranial nerves were preserved in both patients and blood loss was only 200 cc in both cases. We conclude that preoperative embolization is an important adjunct in treating patients with large carotid body tumors. The surgical exploration proceeds much smoother, the blood loss is minimal, and patients have minimal morbidity.
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12/57. carotid body tumor associated with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    We report a case of a carotid body tumor associated with a primary differentiated thyroid carcinoma. A 44-year-old woman presented with a 10-year history of an asymptomatic mass in her neck. physical examination revealed a pulsatile submandibular mass in her right neck as well as multiple nodules in the thyroid. magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and, in particular, angiography were diagnostic of the carotid body tumor. Slight changes in serum thyroglobulin levels and thyroid scintigraphy led us to suspect thyroid carcinoma. Embolization of the arteries feeding the carotid body tumor was performed, and was followed by tumor resection 24 h later. At surgery, histopathology confirmed the presence of follicular and papillary carcinomas of the thyroid, resulting in concurrent resection of the gland. There were no residual cranial nerve deficits. The patient subsequently received radiotherapy. diagnosis and surgical management are discussed, together with pathogenetic factors.
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13/57. Carotid body tumors.

    Carotid body paragangliomas were diagnosed by Doppler ultrasound, carotid artery angiography, and cranial computed tomography in a 35-year-old man with a mass in the neck and hearing loss, and in a 42-year-old man with headache, syncope, and a mass in the neck. They underwent successful surgical excision.
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14/57. Paraganglionomas in the neck.

    Three paraganglionomas in the neck investigated by angiography are presented. The value of angiography in these tumours is stressed, and one case showed distinctive radiological features hitherto undescribed which probably constitute a basis for the definitive preoperative diagnosis of malignant lesions.
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15/57. The value of flow cytometric analysis in multicentric glomus tumors of the head and neck.

    Glomus tumors of the head and neck include those arising from the carotid body, jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Because these cannot be differentiated histologically, when encountering a large tumor mass involving more than one structure in the carotid sheath, one often cannot be sure whether the tumors are from one or more of these structures. The authors performed dna flow cytometric analysis on a patient with a multicentric glomus tumor on the right side of the neck involving the carotid body, jugular vein, and vagus nerve, in an effort to determine the separate or similar origin of her tumor mass. Different dna indices, including a double peak for the carotid body tumor, were obtained. There were three aneuploid tumors and one diploid tumor (dna indices: carotid body 1.78, 2.04; jugular vein 2.20; vagus nerve 1.82). Different synthetic phase fractions were calculated for each aneuploid tumor except the second carotid body peak (carotid body 7.2; jugular vein 3.6; vagus nerve 4.8). The authors conclude that dna flow cytometry may be useful in confirming the multicentric origin of tumors that encompass more than one histologically similar structure.
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16/57. Multiple glomus tumours.

    A patient with multiple, synchronous, non-familial head and neck paragangliomas is reported. There were three primary neoplasms, a glomus tympanicum and glomus vagale on the right side and a glomus tumour of the carotid body on the left. Such a combination has never been reported previously. The reports of all the series with paragangliomas in the literature, as well as the reports of single cases with multiple tumours during the last three decades, are reviewed. Specific problems in diagnosis and management of multiple glomus tumours are discussed.
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17/57. hypotension in a woman with a metastatic dopamine-secreting carotid body tumor.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a woman with metastatic carotid body tumor in whom hypotension occurred in the setting of exceedingly high plasma dopamine levels. methods: We present a case report and review the literature on the topic of dopamine-secreting paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma. RESULTS: A previously healthy 40-year-old Asian woman noted difficulty with swallowing and hoarseness. No neck mass was visible, and she had no symptoms of catecholamine excess and no family history of endocrine disorders or malignant disease. Indirect laryngoscopy revealed a paralyzed left vocal cord and a nonulcerating mass in the left parapharyngeal space. An initial needle biopsy was interpreted as undifferentiated carcinoma. After a second biopsy, this mass was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine tumor, consistent with paraganglioma. The patient underwent surgical resection and radiation therapy (total dose, 40 Gy), after which she remained asymptomatic for 11 years. Then loss of weight, fatigue, nausea, and hypotensive episodes (blood pressures as low as 70/35 mm Hg) prompted whole-body imaging with bone scans, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, which disclosed several lesions in the liver, lungs, and spine, suggestive of metastatic disease. The adrenal glands were unremarkable. A metaiodobenzylguanidine scan with use of (131)I was negative. liver biopsy of a hypodense lesion revealed a neuroendocrine tumor by histologic and immunohistochemical studies. Because of the patient's history, malignant paraganglioma was diagnosed. The tumor secreted predominantly dopamine at extraordinary levels (plasma concentration 27,942 pg/mL; normal, <30). The patient died before further treatment could be initiated. CONCLUSION: Carotid body tumors usually do not secrete catecholamines but frequently metastasize. During progression, these neuroendocrine tumors may become able to produce and secrete selected catecholamines such as dopamine. dopamine can lower the blood pressure rather than causing hypertension, even though hypertension is one of the main symptoms of a pheochromocytoma.
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18/57. A case report of an obesity hypoventilation syndrome associated with obstructive sleep apnea due to a carotid body paraganglioma.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To the best of our knowledge, the association between an obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) due to a neck mass and an obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) has not been reported. patients AND methods: We report the case of a patient with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) in whom OSAS caused by a carotid body paraganglioma contributed to recurrent bouts of severe alveolar hypoventilation. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The complete surgical excision of the paraganglioma resulted in the cure of the OSAS and contributed to a clear improvement of the clinical symptoms of OHS.
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19/57. PET scan assessment of chemotherapy response in metastatic paraganglioma.

    Paragangliomas are indolent tumors that arise from the chief cells of the paraganglia in the head and neck, mediastinum, and retroperitoneal regions. Less than 10% of paragangliomas metastasize. Paragangliomas are known to regress slowly and usually partially after radiation therapy, which has been attributed to the development of fibrosis within the abundant vascular elements of the tumor. Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning was used to monitor a 33-year-old woman with recurrent paraganglioma of the carotid body with lung and bone metastases before and after chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and dacarbazine. The patient derived clinical benefit from chemotherapy, with marked improvement of her systemic and respiratory symptoms, improvement of cancer-related anemia, and normalization of chromogranin a levels. A response was demonstrated on PET scan with decreased [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake after chemotherapy, but no significant changes were detected on serial computed tomography (CT) scans. The patient has remained free of disease progression 24 months after chemotherapy completion. It is suggested that metabolic imaging with PET scans is superior to anatomical imaging with CT scans for the monitoring of patients with paragangliomas.
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20/57. carotid body tumor--a case report.

    Carotid body tumors are rare neoplasms, which typically present as a slow growing, painless neck mass found along the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. These tumors are generally benign but possess aggressive local growth potential. Therefore, definitive treatment requires surgical resection. The authors describe a case of a patient with a carotid body tumor and review the most recent literature on this unusual topic.
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