Cases reported "Carotid Body Tumor"

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1/19. Management of incidentally discovered cervical paragangliomas: report of two cases and review of current issues.

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are uncommon neoplasms arising from the extra-adrenal paraganglia and include carotid body and glomus vagale tumors. These lesions may be discovered incidentally by imaging studies performed to evaluate carotid atherosclerotic occlusive disease. Incidental paragangliomas of the head and neck may be smaller than those discovered due to symptoms. Although surgical resection remains the definitive treatment for head and neck paragangliomas, important issues of management arise when such lesions are discovered. Two recent cases are reported. epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation, and issues of management of head and neck paragangliomas are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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2/19. paraganglioma as a systemic syndrome: pitfalls and strategies.

    Tumours of the neuroendocrine system in the head and neck region are mostly paragangliomas of the glomus tympanicum or jugulare, or of the carotid body. The majority of these tumours are benign, and the coexistence of multiple paragangliomas seems to be rare. Pre-operative embolization and surgery are regarded as primary therapy for these tumours. The treatment regimen in any patient depends on age, general health, hearing status and the function of the lower cranial nerves. Several presentations are possible in which paragangliomas occur as systemic disease. 1. Paragangliomas may occur bilaterally, or, in rare cases, in multiple areas. Pre-operative bilateral angiography is of utmost importance. In case of multicentricity, it might be necessary to proceed without, or just with, unilateral surgery for preservation of adjacent structures. In surgery of jugular vein paraganglioma, we usually perform a modified transmastoidal and transcervical approach with preservation of middle-ear structures and the ossicles. As an alternative or supplement to surgery, radiotherapy or definitive embolization may be used in the treatment of paragangliomas. 2. Paragangliomas may occur as multiple endocrine neoplasia (men) syndrome combined with medullary thyroid gland carcinoma, and, facultatively, pheochromocytoma. In these cases, endocrinological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the adrenal region, the thorax and the neck are required for an adequate therapeutic strategy. As men may be inherited, family history should be evaluated. 3. Paragangliomas can became malignant and metastasize. Thus, cervical lymph node metastases or distant metastases may occur. We recommend the removal of all ipsilateral lymph nodes and their histological examination.
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ranking = 11.545049146685
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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3/19. Glomus faciale, glomus jugulare, glomus tympanicum, glomus vagale, carotid body tumors, and simulating lesions. role of MR imaging.

    In summary, MR imaging characteristics of a case of paraganglioma of the facial nerve are reported. The relationship of paragangliomas and the chromaffin system have been discussed. There are many reports of cases of synchronous paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas. These reports, along with simultaneous involvement in familial men syndromes, and the common embrylogic origin (neural crest) and similar histopathologic relationships between paragangliomas and pheochromocytoma, all support the fact that they are part of the chromaffin system.
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ranking = 54.180196586738
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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4/19. The value of flow cytometric analysis in multicentric glomus tumors of the head and neck.

    Glomus tumors of the head and neck include those arising from the carotid body, jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Because these cannot be differentiated histologically, when encountering a large tumor mass involving more than one structure in the carotid sheath, one often cannot be sure whether the tumors are from one or more of these structures. The authors performed dna flow cytometric analysis on a patient with a multicentric glomus tumor on the right side of the neck involving the carotid body, jugular vein, and vagus nerve, in an effort to determine the separate or similar origin of her tumor mass. Different dna indices, including a double peak for the carotid body tumor, were obtained. There were three aneuploid tumors and one diploid tumor (dna indices: carotid body 1.78, 2.04; jugular vein 2.20; vagus nerve 1.82). Different synthetic phase fractions were calculated for each aneuploid tumor except the second carotid body peak (carotid body 7.2; jugular vein 3.6; vagus nerve 4.8). The authors conclude that dna flow cytometry may be useful in confirming the multicentric origin of tumors that encompass more than one histologically similar structure.
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ranking = 5
keywords = glomus
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5/19. Multiple glomus tumours.

    A patient with multiple, synchronous, non-familial head and neck paragangliomas is reported. There were three primary neoplasms, a glomus tympanicum and glomus vagale on the right side and a glomus tumour of the carotid body on the left. Such a combination has never been reported previously. The reports of all the series with paragangliomas in the literature, as well as the reports of single cases with multiple tumours during the last three decades, are reviewed. Specific problems in diagnosis and management of multiple glomus tumours are discussed.
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ranking = 18.545049146685
keywords = tympanicum, glomus
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6/19. Familial paraganglioma.

    Paragangliomas are unusual tumors that are sometimes familial. We treated a family who exhibited multiple head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGs) and pheochromocytomas. The purpose was to determine the clinical characteristics of paragangliomas with familial history and to define a better standardized proceeding in the management of these tumors. patients diagnosed with head and neck paragangliomas and identified retrospectively through clinical otolaryngology practices were given a medical and family history questionnaire. We studied a family who exhibited familial paragangliomas. This relationship was examined by reviewing the medical records of family members with verified tumors, carrying out neck computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging on their relatives to look for tumors that had been unrecognized in the past. All patients underwent a complete head and neck examination. The initial evaluation usually included CT and/or MRI. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging contributed additional information about tumor extension. angiography was performed in every patient with carotid body tumor, with one undergoing therapeutic embolization to reduce the tumor size. Eleven tumors were identified in four patients with a familial history. Familial disease was initially determined by pedigree analysis. Four patients with a median age of 31 years (range: 25-42) underwent surgery. Median follow-up was 5 years (range 2-14); carotid angiography provided essential mainstays for the definite diagnosis. All patients underwent successful surgical resection of the tumor after the appropriate preoperative preparation. There were no perioperative deaths or hemiplegia. Three patients had bilaterality carotid body paragangliomas. One patient had three paragangliomas, and two patients had bilateral carotid body paragangliomas associated with pheochromocytoma. Clinically functioning tumors and malignant tumors were not identified, and none of the patients died after surgery. During follow-up, none of the patients developed recurrence or metastatic disease. The carotid body paraganglioma (CBPG) and glomus vagale manifested as asymptomatic neck masses. The clinical pheochromocytomas typically present with uncontrolled hypertension. In conclusion, paragangliomas are rare, with multicentricity being more common in patients with a familial history. In patients with familial paragangliomas, high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are recommended for early screening and contributed additional information about the tumor extension and definitive treatment. Early surgery is recommended to minimize major risks.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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7/19. Tissue culture, electron microscopic and enzyme histochemical investigations of extraadrenal paragangliomas.

    light and electromicroscopical as well as histochemical investigations were performed on three cases of extraadrenal paragangliomas. They were localized in the carotid body, tympanicum and cauda equina region. Tissue of two cases was cultivated in vitro in nutrient medium TCM 199. The tumours were classified as paragangliomas of the paraganglionic type with typical cell clusters, of the adenomatous and angiomatous type. The enzyme histochemistry showed a very high dehydrogenase activity. Ultrastructurally numerous typical osmiophilic granules could be observed in the cytoplasm of the tumour cells. In tissue culture only a minimal cellular proliferative activity could be detected. The few proliferating cell colonies showed mostly characteristics of epithelial tissue and sometimes a similar behaviour to cells of a ganglioneuroblastoma. The minimal proliferative activity in vitro is in good agreement with the proliferative behaviour of the extraadrenal paragangliomas in vivo.
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ranking = 10.545049146685
keywords = tympanicum
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8/19. Bilateral chemodectoma in the neck.

    A 55-year-old man with bilateral cervical chemodectoma is reported. The differences between tumours of the carotid body and those of the glomus intravagale are described and a brief review of the investigation and management of such tumours is given.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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9/19. Chemodectomas: a review of 17 cases.

    Seventeen cases of chemodectomas seen in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, are presented. Eight of them (48%) are carotid body tumors, while six (36%) are glomus jugulare. The rest are subglottic, abdominal and multicentric. The sex distribution for the two major types is equal for males and females; but they all seem to appear in younger age groups. Operative mortality has been exclusive to carotid body tumors (50% for this group), while bleeding is the leading postoperative complication in all the cases. The embryology, pathophysiology and clinical presentation of chemodectomas are discussed and it is suggested that, in the management of this condition, the advantages of operation should be weighed against morbidity and mortality risks.
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ranking = 1
keywords = glomus
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10/19. Management of bilateral carotid body tumors and a glomus jugulare tumor in a child.

    This paper reports on a 14-year-old female child with bilateral carotid tumors and a glomus jugulare tumor, a rare combination of tumors in any patient and previously unreported in a child. The literature is reviewed and the details of the history, physical findings, results of laboratory tests, and the surgical management of the patient are discussed. The need for an exhaustive preoperative evaluation is stressed so that the proper surgery can be planned. The difficulties of surgical management, the complications, morbidity and potential hazards of surgery in these vascular tumors are presented. The unusual complications that a patient in the pediatric age group encountered as compared to those seen in adults are discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = glomus
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