Cases reported "Cat Diseases"

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1/6. Molecular identification and epidemiological tracing of pasteurella multocida meningitis in a baby.

    We report a case of pasteurella multocida meningitis in a 1-month-old baby exposed to close contact with two dogs and a cat but without any known history of injury by these animals. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the isolate from the baby allowed identification at the subspecies level and pointed to the cat as a possible source of infection. molecular typing of Pasteurella isolates from the animals, from the baby, and from unrelated animals clearly confirmed that the cat harbored the same P. multocida subsp. septica strain on its tonsils as the one isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of the baby. This case stresses the necessity of informing susceptible hosts at risk of contracting zoonotic agents about some basic hygiene rules when keeping pets. In addition, this study illustrates the usefulness of molecular methods for identification and epidemiological tracing of Pasteurella isolates.
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2/6. 'Battered pets': munchausen syndrome by proxy (factitious illness by proxy).

    Nine cases of suspected munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP), involving pets as proxies, were identified among 448 cases of non-accidental injury to small animals. These cases, recorded by a random sample of small animal practitioners in the UK, demonstrated several combinations of features, including attention-seeking behaviour by the owner, real and apparently factitious clinical signs, deliberate injury, markedly abnormal biochemical profiles, serial incidents, interference with surgical sites, recovery after separation from the owner, and 'veterinarian-shopping' by the owner. All of these features are consistent with those identified in the well documented MSBP in which children are the victims. Furthermore, one of the cases involved serial attempts at poisoning other animals and a child.
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3/6. conjunctivitis due to chlamydophila felis (Chlamydia psittaci feline pneumonitis agent) acquired from a cat: case report with molecular characterization of isolates from the patient and cat.

    conjunctivitis due to chlamydiaceae other than chlamydia trachomatis is rarely reported because of infrequent occurrence or inadequate investigation. A case of chronic non-trachomatis chlamydial conjunctivitis is described. After full clinical information was supplied to the laboratory, a non-trachomatis chlamydia was recovered from the patient's eye. This organism, and a subsequent isolate from one of the patient's cats, were shown to be indistinguishable examples of the recently described species chlamydophila felis. The infection was most likely acquired from the patient's cats. A prolonged course of doxycycline was required to eradicate the infection.
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4/6. tinea faciei caused by microsporum canis in a newborn.

    A case of tinea faciei caused by microsporum canis in a 14-day-old infant is reported. The incubation period was seen to be 1 week. This was a familial infection which also affected the infant's grandmother and their pet cat and dog. Topical treatment with clotrimazole controlled the infection in the baby. A review of 14 cases (including our own) of dermatophytosis in newborn infants reported in the Japanese literature showed that newborn infants might be infected by several of these agents.
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5/6. Fatal-cat trasmitted tularemia: demonstration of the organism in tissue.

    The case reported represents an unusual mode of transmission of tularemia from cat to man, with fatal outcome. The use of the modified Dieterle spirochete stain demonstrated F tularensis in tissue when all other routine stains failed. Direct immunofluorescent staining confirmed the presence of the organism in tissue sections. F tularensis and the etiologic agent of legionnaires' disease are similar only in their ability to stain with the modified Dieterle stain and their inability to stain with conventional histochemical technics.
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6/6. Rochalimaea henselae infection. A new zoonosis with the domestic cat as reservoir.

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the reservoir and vector(s) for Rochalimaea henselae, a causative agent of bacillary angiomatosis (BA) and cat scratch disease, and to estimate the percentage of domestic cats with R henselae bacteremia in the Greater san francisco Bay Region of Northern california. DESIGN--Hospital-based survey of patients diagnosed with BA who also had significant exposure to at least one pet cat, as well as a convenience sampling of pet or impounded cats for prevalence of Rochalimaea bacteremia. SETTING--Community and university hospitals and clinics; veterinary clinics treating privately owned or impounded cats. patients--patients with or without human immunodeficiency virus infection, with biopsy-confirmed BA, who had prolonged exposure to pet cats prior to developing BA. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cultures and laboratory studies were performed on blood drawn from pet cats associated with patients with BA. The Rochalimaea species infecting pet cats and fleas and causing the BA lesions in human contacts of these cats was identified by culture, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and dna sequencing. The presence of R henselae bacteremia in pet cats was documented, and predictor variables for culture positivity were evaluated. RESULTS--Four patients diagnosed with BA who had prolonged contact with seven pet cats were identified. The Rochalimaea species causing BA lesions in these patients was determined to be R henselae. The seven pet cats were found to be bacteremic with R henselae; this bacterium was also detected in fleas taken from an infected cat by both direct culture and polymerase chain reaction. blood samples were cultured from pet and impounded cats (N = 61) in the Greater san francisco Bay Region, and R henselae was isolated from 41% (25/61) of these cats. CONCLUSION--We have documented that the domestic cat serves as a major persistent reservoir for R henselae, with prolonged, asymptomatic bacteremia from which humans, especially the immunocompromised, may acquire potentially serious infections. Antibiotic treatment of infected cats and control of flea infestation are potential strategies for decreasing human exposure to R henselae.
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