Cases reported "Cataract"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/109. Stability of vision during space flight in an astronaut with bilateral intraocular lenses.

    PURPOSE: To report excellent and stable vision in an astronaut during space flight after bilateral cataract surgery with intraocular lenses. methods: A 60-year-old physician mission specialist astronaut developed cataracts and underwent phacoemulsification with insertion of one-piece polymethylmethacrylate intraocular lenses that had 6-mm optics bilaterally. Several months later, he flew on a space shuttle mission. Ocular examinations were performed before and after the mission, and the patient was questioned about visual changes during flight. RESULTS: Ocular examinations demonstrated stable bilateral posterior chamber intraocular lenses. Our subject reported excellent vision during liftoff, 18 days of microgravity, changes in cabin pressure, and reentry. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that intraocular lenses are safe, effective, and well tolerated during space flight.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/109. Merosin-positive congenital muscular dystrophy in two siblings with cataract and slight mental retardation.

    We report on two siblings that have been followed for 14 years, with merosin-positive congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), cataract, retinitis pigmentosa, dysversion of the optic disc, but no cerebral anomalies, except for microcephaly and slight mental retardation (MR). The younger child had three generalized seizures easily controlled by anticonvulsant therapy. Both children presented hypotonia from birth, delayed psychomotor development, generalized muscular weakness, and atrophy and joint contractures of knees and ankles. The course of the disease, apparently static during the first 10 years of life, became progressive during the second decade with loss of deambulation by the age of 13. creatine kinase was increased in both children. Bilateral cataract was diagnosed at 6-months of age. In spite of the occurrence of microcephaly, MR was slight and the siblings acquired reading and writing skills after the aged 10. head magnetic resonance imaging showed normal results in both siblings. The classification of these cases within the broad spectrum of CMD is difficult since most of the known muscle-eye-brain syndromes generally show severe MR and brain anomalies. We consider these cases as corresponding to the rarer syndromes of merosin-positive CMD with associated features such as cataract and MR that were particularly emphasized during the 50th ENMC International Workshop on CMD [Dubowitz V. Workshop report: 50th ENMC International workshop on congenital muscular dystrophy. Neuromusc Disord 1997;7:539-547]. Further genetic, pathological, neuroradiological, and immunocytochemical studies will be necessary for better elucidation of the classification and pathogenesis of CMD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.0320633280027
keywords = atrophy, optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/109. microcephaly, microphthalmia, congenital cataract, optic atrophy, short stature, hypotonia, severe psychomotor retardation, and cerebral malformations: a second family with micro syndrome or a new syndrome?

    We report on four children of both sexes from a highly inbred family with hypotonia, spastic diplegia, microcephaly, microphthalmia, congenital cataract, optic atrophy, ptosis, kyphoscoliosis, short stature, severe mental retardation, and cerebral malformations. Six other children may also have been affected. The differential diagnosis and the possibility of a second family with the micro syndrome are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 110.25632270011
keywords = optic atrophy, atrophy, optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/109. Demyelinating sensorimotor neuropathy with congenital cataract, mental retardation, and unique, dysplastic perineurial cells within the endoneurium.

    We report on a 27-year-old Caucasian female with congenital cataract and mental retardation complaining of progressive paresis and atrophy of the lower legs beginning at the age of 16 years followed by atrophy of the thighs and small hand muscles. Motor and sensory conduction velocities (CV) of the upper and lower limbs were reduced (distal peroneal nerve: 21 m/s; median nerve: motor CV: 28 m/s, sensory CV 30 m/s). In the sural nerve biopsy specimens there were unique endoneurial cells immunoreactive for antibodies against the epithelial membrane antigen with multiple surface indentations and projections considered to be dysplastic perineurial cells. To the best of our knowledge these cells have not been reported in any other type of human peripheral neuropathy. The present case with the above clinical and structural findings appears to represent a new, complex, demyelinating type of a sporadic or possibly recessively inherited motor and sensory neuropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.0641266560054
keywords = atrophy
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/109. eye injuries associated with paintball guns.

    AIMS: This study identifies the various types of ocular injuries sustained after blunt trauma with a paintball fired from a paintball gun. methods: We report two patients who sustained injury to an eye after being shot with a paintball and review similar cases presented in the world literature. The type of injury sustained and the final visual acuity obtained after a paintball hit to the eye are examined. RESULTS: The two boys presented were hit in the eye with a paintball resulting in lens subluxation, hyphema formation, and angle recession. cataract extraction was required in both cases. One boy also had an optic neuropathy and a choroidal rupture. A review of the literature reveals a variety of injuries occur after a paintball hit to the eye. In some of the cases, the damage to the eye has led to loss of vision and at times loss of the eye. CONCLUSIONS: Paintball guns can cause devastating ocular injuries. Wearing protective eye and face gear during this game is essential. We recommend that an anti-fog face mask with a one-piece polycarbonate eye shield be worn by those participating in paintball games.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/109. Cataract surgery combined with implantation of an artificial iris.

    We describe 6 patients who presented with cataract or aphakia and absent or nonfunctional irides. The etiologies included congenital aniridia, traumatic iris loss, and chronic mydriasis secondary to recurrent herpetic uveitis. In 5 eyes, a prosthetic iris was successfully implanted in combination with small incision cataract surgery. In 2 eyes, a single-piece iris diaphragm and optical lens was implanted. Artificial irides offer a safe alternative for patients who previously had no viable options for iris reconstruction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/109. Conradi-Hunermann syndrome with ocular anomalies.

    We report a Japanese girl with the Conradi-Hunermann form of chondrodysplasia punctata and anterior segment malformations characteristic of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. The patient also had cataracts and unilateral optic atrophy. A possible role for homeobox-containing genes in the etiology of this type of chondrodysplasia punctata is suggested as an explanation for the coincidence of these two syndromes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 22.051264540022
keywords = optic atrophy, atrophy, optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/109. Ocular toxicity of systemic medications: a case series.

    BACKGROUND: There are many visually threatening conditions that may result from long-term use of systemic medications. Many of these adverse side effects can be greatly reduced or prevented with close monitoring of patients. In view of current knowledge, updated clinical guidelines for appropriate monitoring of ocular toxicity from systemic medications need to be developed for the eye care practitioner. CASE review: There have been many reports of ocular toxicity from isoniazid, thioridazine, steroids, and amiodarone therapy. Clinical cases illustrating possible adverse ocular side effects are presented, which include INH-induced optic neuropathy, phenothiazine-induced retinopathy, steroid-induced glaucoma, and vortex epitheliopathy secondary to amiodarone. CONCLUSION: Optometrists should be aware of the potential for ocular side effects from systemic medications. Eye care guidelines for monitoring ocular side effects from thioridazine, INH, steroids, and amiodarone use are suggested.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/109. Childhood blindness and visual loss: an assessment at two institutions including a "new" cause.

    PURPOSE: This study was initiated to investigate the causes of childhood blindness and visual impairment in the united states. We also sought a particular etiology--congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)--which has been considered exceedingly rare, in a fixed target population of children, the severely mentally retarded. methods: We undertook a library-based study of the world literature to shed light on the causes of childhood blindness internationally and to put our data in context. We prospectively examined all consented children (159) at 2 institutions in the united states to determine their ocular status and the etiology of any visual loss present. One of the institutions is a school for the visually impaired (hereafter referred to as Location V), in which most of the students have normal mentation. The other is a home for severely mentally retarded, nonambulatory children (hereafter referred to as Location M). This institution was selected specifically to provide a sample of visual loss associated with severe retardation because the handful of cases of LCMV in the literature have been associated with severe central nervous system insults. Histories were obtained from records on site, and all children received a complete cyclopleged ophthalmic examination at their institution performed by the author. patients at Location M with chorioretinal scars consistent with intrauterine infection (a possible sign of LCMV) had separate consents for blood drawing. Sera was obtained and sent for standard TORCHS titers, toxoplasmosis titers (Jack S. Remington, MD, Palo Alto, Calif), and ELISA testing for LCMV (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga). RESULTS: The diagnoses at Location V were varied and included retinopathy of prematurity (19.4%), optic atrophy (19.4%), retinitis pigmentosa (14.5%), optic nerve hypoplasia (12.9%), cataracts (8.1%), foveal hypoplasia (8.1%), persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (4.8%), and microphthalmos (3.2%). The most common diagnosis at Location M was bilateral optic atrophy, which was found in 65% of the patients examined who had visual loss. Of these, the insults were most often congenital (42.6%), with birth trauma, prematurity, and genetics each responsible for about 15% of the optic atrophy. The second most common diagnosis was cortical visual impairment (24%), followed by chorioretinal scars (5%), which are strongly suggestive of intrauterine infection. Of 95 patients examined at Location M, 4 had chorioretinal scars. Two of these had dramatically elevated titers for LCMV, as did one of their mothers. One of the other 2 children died before serum could be drawn, and the fourth had negative titers for both TORCHS and LCMV. CONCLUSIONS: At both locations studied, visual loss was most often due to congenital insults, whether genetic or simply prenatal. The visual loss at Location V was twice as likely as that at Location M to be caused by a genetic disorder. The genetic disorders at Location V were more often isolated eye diseases, while those among the severely retarded at Location M were more generalized genetic disorders. Our study identified optic atrophy as a common diagnosis among the severely mentally retarded with vision loss, a finding that is supported by previous studies in other countries. In our population of severely retarded children, the target etiology of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was responsible for half the visual loss secondary to chorioretinitis from intrauterine infection. This is more common than would be predicted by the few cases previously described in the literature, and strongly suggests that LCMV may be a more common cause of visual loss than previously appreciated. We believe that serology for LCMV should be part of the workup for congenital chorioretinitis, especially if the TORCHS titers are negative, and that perhaps the mnemonic should be revised to "TORCHS L." Childhood blindness and visual impairment are tragic and co
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 70.185856948068
keywords = optic atrophy, atrophy, optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/109. Interlenticular opacification: clinicopathological correlation of a complication of posterior chamber piggyback intraocular lenses.

    PURPOSE: To present a clinicopathological correlation of 2 pairs of piggyback posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PC IOLs) explanted because of opacification between the lens optics. SETTING: Gayton health Center, Eyesight Associates of Middle georgia, Warner Robins, georgia, and Center for research on Ocular therapeutics and Biodevices, Storm Eye Institute, Medical University of south carolina, Charleston, south carolina, USA. methods: Two pairs of piggyback AcrySof lenses were explanted from 2 patients with significant visual loss related to opacification between the optics. They were submitted for pathological analysis. Gross and histopathological examinations were performed, and photomicroscopy was used to document the results. RESULTS: Gross examination showed accumulation of a membrane-like white material between the lenses. Histopathological examination revealed that the tissue consisted of retained/proliferative lens epithelial cells (bladder cells or pearls) mixed with lens cortical material. CONCLUSION: Piggyback PC IOLs were explanted in 2 cases because of a newly described complication, interlenticular opacification. Three surgical means may help prevent this complication: meticulous cortical cleanup, especially in the equatorial region; creation of a relatively large continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis to sequester retained cells peripheral to the IOL optic within the equatorial fornix; insertion of the posterior IOL in the capsular bag and the anterior IOL in the ciliary sulcus to isolate retained cells from the interlenticular space.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = optic
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cataract'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.