Cases reported "Cellulitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/10. capnocytophaga cynodegmi cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis in a diabetic man.

    capnocytophaga cynodegmi (formerly "DF-2 like organism"), a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity, is a capnophilic, gram-negative, facultative bacillus. C. cynodegmi has rarely been encountered in human diseases. We report the first known case of cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis caused by C. cynodegmi in a diabetic man from central india following a dog bite.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/10. shewanella alga bacteremia and associated cellulitis in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    shewanella alga is a gram-negative bacillus found in all types of water as well as in a variety of tainted food. It has rarely been associated with human disease, either in healthy or in immunocompromised patients. We report a 66-year-old man with a multiple myeloma who developed a cellulitis in both forearms in the course of a shewanella bacteremia. He had a renal insufficiency and was moderately neutropenic after chemotherapy (vincristine, adriamycin, dexamethasone). Outcome was good after treatment with ceftazidime-amikacin despite all the risk factors. shewanella isolation may be clinically significant. Haematological patients constitute a group of risk as increasingly aggressive chemotherapy regimens are used. Clinical outcome is not necessarily bad.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/10. arcanobacterium haemolyticum sinusitis and orbital cellulitis.

    We present a case of sinusitis and orbital cellulitis in a 9-year-old girl caused by the Gram-positive bacillus arcanobacterium haemolyticum. In addition to antimicrobial chemotherapy, two surgical procedures were required to drain the ethmoid and maxillary sinus cavities and a subperiosteal abscess.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/10. orbital cellulitis caused by eikenella corrodens.

    eikenella corrodens is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacillus with specific culture and growth requirements and unusual antibacterial susceptibilities. It has only recently been recognized as a human pathogen. Ocular and adnexal infections with this organism are rare especially in children. We treated two children with orbital cellulitis caused by E. corrodens. One was an 8-year-old boy; the other was an 11-year-old girl. orbital cellulitis in both patients occurred after an upper respiratory tract infection. sinusitis and a subperiosteal abscess were present in both patients. eikenella corrodens and Streptococcus viridans were isolated from the boy; E. corrodens was the sole isolate in the girl. Intravenous ampicillin, prolonged hospitalization, and surgical drainage of the orbit were required to control the infection in both patients. eikenella corrodens must be considered in the differential diagnosis of orbital cellulitis in children, and ophthalmologists must become familiar with the characteristics of this peculiar organism.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/10. Atypical mycobacterium soft-tissue infection of the dorsal radial wrist: a possible complication of steroid injection for de Quervain's disease.

    Corticosteroid injection into the first dorsal compartment for acute de Quervain's tenosynovitis is an accepted form of therapy. Potential side effects include soft-tissue atrophy, tendon attrition, postinjection neuritis of the superficial radial nerve, systemic reactions, and infection. We present a patient with a mycobacterium chelonei infection localized to the soft tissue overlying the first dorsal compartment, occurring 3 years after a triamcinolone injection into this area. Histological examination with the polarizing microscope revealed persistent steroid granules in the involved tissue. Successful treatment consisted of complete excision of the involved skin and subcutaneous tissue followed by delayed closure. Systemic antibiotics were not used.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.9934250245551
keywords = mycobacterium
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/10. haemophilus influenzae infections in adults: report of nine cases and a review of the literature.

    haemophilus influenzae is an aerobic pleomorphic gram-negative coccobacillus that requires both X and V factors for growth. It grows poorly, if at all, on ordinary blood agar unless streaked with Staph. aureus. It grows well on chocolate agar. Because this medium is often not used in culturing specimens from adults and because the organism may be overgrown by other bacteria, the frequency of H. influenzae infections has undoubtedly been seriously underestimated. This is aggravated by the failure of many physicians to obtain blood cultures in suspected bacterial infections and the failure of many laboratories to subculture them routinely onto chocolate agar. H. influenzae, along with streptococcus pneumoniae, is a major factor in acute sinusitis. It is probably the most frequent etiologic agent of acute epiglottitis. It is probably a common, but commonly unrecognized, cause of bacterial pneumonia, where it has a distinctive appearance on Gram stain. It is unusual in adult meningitis, but should particularly be considered in alcoholics; in those with recent or remote head trauma, especially with cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea; in patients with splenectomies and those with primary or secondary hypogammaglobulinemia. It may rarely cause a wide variety of other infections in adults, including purulent pericarditis, endocarditis, septic arthritis, obstetrical and gynecologic infections, urinary and biliary tract infections, and cellulitis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is somewhat capricious in part from the marked effect of inoculum size in some circumstances. in vitro and in vivo results support the use of ampicillin, unless the organism produces beta-lactamase. Alternatives in minor infections include tetracycline, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim. For serious infections chloramphenicol is the best choice if the organism is ampicillin-resistant or the patient is penicillin-allergic.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/10. DF-2 bacteremia following cat bites. Report of two cases.

    DF-2 is a recently described gram-negative bacillus known to be part of the normal flora of dogs. A variety of serious infections (bacteremia, endocarditis, meningitis, cellulitis) caused by DF-2 have occurred following dog bites. Asplenic patients appear to be especially susceptible to DF-2 infection. Two cases of DF-2 bacteremia occurring after domestic cat bites are reported. sepsis and meningitis developed in an asplenic patient, and an immunocompetent patient presented with primary cellulitis. Both patients responded promptly to parenteral antibiotic therapy. DF-2 must now be considered along with pasteurella multocida in the differential of cellulitis or sepsis following bites or scratches from domestic cats.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/10. pasteurella multocida infections. Report of 34 cases and review of the literature.

    pasteurella multocida, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus , is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including the dog and cat. P. multocida is the etiologic agent in a variety of infectious disease syndromes. We have reported 34 cases of infection caused by P. multocida and have reviewed the English literature. P. multocida infections may be divided into three broad groups: 1. Infections resulting from animal bites and scratches : The most common infections caused by P. multocida are local wound infections following animal bites or scratches . cats are the source of infection in 60 to 80% of cases and dogs in the great majority of the remainder. Local infections are characterized by the rapid appearance of erythema, warmth, tenderness, and frequently purulent drainage. The most common local complications are abscess formation and tenosynovitis. Serious local complications include septic arthritis proximal to bites or scratches , osteomyelitis resulting from direct inoculation or extension of cellulitis, and the combination of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, most commonly involving a finger or hand after a cat bite. 2. Isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract: The isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract must be interpreted differently than its isolation from other systemic sites. Most commonly P. multocida found in the respiratory tract is a commensal organism in patients with underlying pulmonary disease, but serious respiratory tract infections including pneumonia, empyema, and lung abscesses may develop. Most patients with respiratory tract colonization or infection have a history of animal exposure. 3. Other systemic infections: P. multocida is recognized as a pathogen in a variety of systemic infections including bacteremia, meningitis, brain abscess, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess. P. multocida often acts as an opportunistic pathogen with a predilection for causing bacteremia in patients with liver dysfunction, septic arthritis in damaged joints, meningitis in the very young or elderly, and pulmonary colonization or invasion in patients with underlying respiratory tract abnormalities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/10. eikenella corrodens osteomyelitis, arthritis, and cellulitis of the hand.

    eikenella corrodens was isolated from an orally contaminated hand wound which resulted in cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and arthritis. E corrodens is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacillus which only lately has received attention as a possible pathogen. The organism grows characteristically as small, corroding, or pitting colonies on blood agar. It typically requires hemin or blood for reliable aerobic growth. Oral contamination of wounds predisposes to infection with E. corrodens. The management of these infections includes treatment with an effective antibiotic and surgical debridement. Because it is gram-negative, microaerophilic, and often difficult to isolate, infections caused by E corrodens may mimic those caused by gram-negative obligate anaerobes. However, E corrodens is resistant to clindamycin and lincomycin and sensitive to most other commonly used antimicrobial agents.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/10. Cellulitis and myositis caused by agrobacterium radiobacter and haemophilus parainfluenzae after influenza virus vaccination.

    agrobacterium radiobacter is a gram-negative aerobic bacillus that has been reported as a cause of disease only 36 times in the literature. More than half of the patients (25) have had bacteremia. peritonitis, urinary tract infection, endocarditis, and one case of cellulitis associated with bacteremia have also been reported. Infection is often associated with immunosuppression and the presence of a plastic foreign body, such as central venous catheters, nephrostomy tubes, intraperitoneal catheters, and prosthetic cardiac valves. We present apparently the first case of A radiobacter causing myositis after influenza virus vaccination.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cellulitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.