Cases reported "Cellulitis"

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1/30. Management of mandibular fascial space infection of odontogenic origin.

    Cellulitis is an acute, painful infection whose swelling is larger with diffuse borders. When palpated, early cellulitis can be very soft or doughfy; a severe cellulitis is almost always described as indurated or even as being "board-like". It can be innocuous in its early stages and extremely dangerous in its more advance, indurated, rapidly spreading stages. Randy, a 16 years old boy who thought that a regularly occurring toothache can advance into a life-threatening complication has a lot to be thankful for. The patient was referred to the pediatric dentistry Division by the E.R. doctors for further evaluation and management due to a swelling on the lower quadrant of his face. This was on the 8th day after he experienced the first pain on tooth no. 47.
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2/30. Vesicular carcinoma erysipelatodes.

    carcinoma erysipelatodes, also known as inflammatory metastatic carcinoma, is a type of cutaneous metastatic disease. We describe a 64-year-old woman with metastatic breast carcinoma who presented with a blistering erythematous eruption resembling erysipelas with formation of vesicles and bullae. She was found to have carcinoma erysipelatodes with a formation of vesicles and bullae.
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3/30. Odontogenic sinusitis causing orbital cellulitis.

    BACKGROUND: Odontogenic sinusitis is a well-recognized condition that usually is responsive to standard medical and surgical treatment. Current antibiotic therapy recommendations are directed against the usual odontogenic and sinus flora. CASE DESCRIPTION: The authors present a case of a patient with acute sinusitis initiated by a complicated tooth extraction that did not yield readily to standard treatment. The case was complicated by orbital extension of the sinusitis. The authors isolated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, species from the affected sinus that usually is not encountered in uncomplicated acute nonnosocomial or odontogenic sinusitis. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Though such forms of resistant microbial flora as MRSA are rare, they may be seen in patients who have a history of intravenous, or i.v., drug use and in immunocompromised patients. Management of patients with orbital extension of sinusitis requires hospitalization and i.v. antibiotic treatment.
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4/30. Diffuse acute cellulitis with severe neurological sequelae. A clinical case.

    The incidence of head and neck odontogenic infections considerably diminished in the last decades due to appropriate antibiotic therapy. Herein we describe a case of acute diffuse facial cellulitis following tooth extraction in a patient with no apparent risk factor. During the acute process, injury was caused to the hypoglossal, vagal, glossopharyngeal and recurrent nerves of both sides. For this reason the patient currently has a nasogastric line for enteral feedings and a tracheotomy tube, which significantly affects his quality of life.
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5/30. Tuberculous cellulitis.

    We report a case of cutaneous tuberculosis presenting as cellulitis. The patient was a 63-year-old Korean woman who also had diabetes mellitus and a 20-year-history of oral corticosteroid medication prescribed for arthralgia. In addition, she had had pulmonary tuberculosis 20-year previously for which she received systemic treatment for 1 year. Her clinical cellulitis failed to respond to antibiotic therapy. Subsequent investigations, using histopathology and polymerase chain reaction, established an alternative diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. The skin eruption cleared after treatment with isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. This case represents a most unusual presentation of tuberculosis in the skin. The atypical features may reflect the patient's general medical state.
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6/30. Possible role of cellular immunity: a case of cellulitis.

    On the basis of the observation that there was a "skip" area in an otherwise diffuse drug eruption where cellulitis had previously occurred, it is theorized that both delayed hypersensitivity type of dermatologic drug reaction and cellulitis share pathogenic mechanisms.
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7/30. Sweet's syndrome in acute myelogenous leukemia presenting as periorbital cellulitis with an infiltrate of leukemic cells.

    Sweet's syndrome is characterized by the abrupt onset of fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and erythematous, tender pseudovesiculated plaques or nodules that respond readily to corticosteroid therapy. It is usually distinguished by the presence of mature neutrophils on histopathologic examination. We describe a 38-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia who had an erythematous vesicular eruption of the left eye develop that resembled cellulitis. A biopsy specimen revealed a dermal infiltrate of mature neutrophils and immature myeloblastic precursors. He later had hemorrhagic pseudovesiculated plaques develop bilaterally on his hands. A biopsy specimen again revealed abundant neutrophils with immature forms. A similar eruption developed at the site of a Hickman catheter placement 4 months later. His skin lesions responded rapidly to oral corticosteroids. This case is unique in that his initial presentation of Sweet's syndrome resembled orbital cellulitis that was characterized by immature myeloid precursors on histopathology.
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ranking = 1.4042276767575
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8/30. Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) successfully treated with low-dose cyclosporine.

    Eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells'syndrome) is an uncommon skin disorder. We report two adult male patients who had recurrent erythematous plaques and a nodular lesion on the abdomen. The histopathologic feature of their skin biopsies similarly indicated a marked infiltrate of eosinophils in the dermis with the fashion of "flame figures". One of the patients demonstrated blood eosinophilia. Given the clinicohistological findings, the patients fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of eosinophilic cellulitis. The skin lesions remained refractory to medications such as corticosteroids, sulfones, antihistamines, and minocycline. Considering the beneficial effect of cyclosporine in the treatment of eosinophilia-associated dermatoses, we speculated that eosinophilic cellulitis might respond to cyclosporine therapy. Thus, each of the two patients was given cyclosporine (microemulsion formulation) at a daily dose of 1.25 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.e., 100 or 200 mg, respectively. Complete remission of the skin eruptions was obtained in both patients during a 3- or 4-week period of treatment. No side effects were observed. Neither of the patients experienced relapse of the disease at least over 10 months after the discontinuation of the cyclosporine therapy. We suggest that administration of low-dose cyclosporine be a safe and useful therapeutic option in patients with eosinophilic cellulitis.
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9/30. Nodular presentation of eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome).

    Eosinophilic cellulitis is a rare condition of unknown aetiology. The classical presentation is of a tender or mildly pruritic cellulitis-like eruption, that has typical histology characterized by tissue eosinophilia, oedema and "flame" figures. Other reported clinical presentations include papular and nodular eruptions. It may be recurrent, and preceded at a variable time by a pruritic papular eruption. We describe a patient with the rare nodular variant of eosinophilic cellulitis affecting the palms of the hands, which occurred 2 years after a nonspecific pruritic papular eruption, without an obvious precipitant and in the absence of the more typical cellulitis-like plaques.
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10/30. Bullous eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells' syndrome) associated with churg-strauss syndrome.

    We report a patient with churg-strauss syndrome (CSS) with asthma, eosinophilia, nasal polyposis and ANCA-associated multisystem vasculitis, who's skin eruption started with erythematous urticarial-plaques followed by haemorrhagic bullae. histology of the plaques revealed 'flame figures' in the dermis with no granulomatous or vasculitic process, consistent with the diagnosis of eosinophilic cellulitis or Wells' syndrome. The association of CSS and Wells' syndrome observed in this patient may have a common pathogenesis. CSS may induce Wells' syndrome by an unknown factor.
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