Cases reported "Cellulitis"

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1/10. Sweet's syndrome in acute myelogenous leukemia presenting as periorbital cellulitis with an infiltrate of leukemic cells.

    Sweet's syndrome is characterized by the abrupt onset of fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and erythematous, tender pseudovesiculated plaques or nodules that respond readily to corticosteroid therapy. It is usually distinguished by the presence of mature neutrophils on histopathologic examination. We describe a 38-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia who had an erythematous vesicular eruption of the left eye develop that resembled cellulitis. A biopsy specimen revealed a dermal infiltrate of mature neutrophils and immature myeloblastic precursors. He later had hemorrhagic pseudovesiculated plaques develop bilaterally on his hands. A biopsy specimen again revealed abundant neutrophils with immature forms. A similar eruption developed at the site of a Hickman catheter placement 4 months later. His skin lesions responded rapidly to oral corticosteroids. This case is unique in that his initial presentation of Sweet's syndrome resembled orbital cellulitis that was characterized by immature myeloid precursors on histopathology.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neutrophilic
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2/10. A case of dissecting cellulitis and a review of the literature.

    Dissecting cellulitis (also called perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens) manifests with perifollicular pustules, nodules, abscesses and sinuses that evolve into scarring alopecia. It predominantly occurs in African American men between 20-40 years of age, but can occasionally affect other races and women too. Associated musculoskeletal findings are sometimes reported. When it occurs with acne conglobata, hidradenitis suppurativa, and pilonidal cysts, the syndrome is referred to as the follicular occlusion triad or tetrad. Its course is chronic and relapsing, and treatment is often difficult. Medical therapies include isotretinoin, antibiotics, and prednisone. Destructive therapies include x-ray therapy, surgical excision, and skin grafting. Laser epilation of hair follicles is a promising new therapy for dissecting cellulitis.
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ranking = 18.452496047346
keywords = hidradenitis
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3/10. Sweet's syndrome masquerading as facial cellulitis.

    Sweet's syndrome, or acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis, is a cutaneous condition that typically occurs as tender red plaques or nodules. However, atypical presentations may occur and, in our case, Sweet's syndrome masqueraded as facial cellulitis and soft tissue infections of the extremities in a sporotrichoid pattern. Despite treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, the cutaneous lesions progressed. Results of skin biopsy specimens of the facial plaque and a nodule on the right upper extremity were diagnostic of Sweet's syndrome. Simultaneous to diagnosis, the patient also was found to have acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
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ranking = 1
keywords = neutrophilic
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4/10. Musculoskeletal features of acne, hidradenitis suppurativa, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.

    This article describes the various forms of acne and the clinical and radiographic features of the associated musculoskeletal manifestations. Occasionally, acne may occur together with hidradenitis suppurativa and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, the so called "follicular occlusion triad." The current understanding of the etiology of these conditions and their treatment are also reviewed.
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ranking = 92.262480236729
keywords = hidradenitis
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5/10. A case of pyoderma vegetans and the follicular occlusion triad.

    A case of pyoderma vegetans (PYV) and hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is described. Our patient had a previous history of perifolliculitis capitis abscedens et suffodiens and acne conglobata. Direct immunofluorescence findings ruled out pemphigus vegetans and suggested a potential pathogenic mechanism.
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ranking = 18.452496047346
keywords = hidradenitis
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6/10. keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome in association with follicular occlusion triad.

    keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a rare congenital disorder of the ectoderm caused by mutations in the connexin-26 gene (GJB2) on chromosome 13q11-q12, giving rise to keratitis, erythrokeratoderma and neurosensory deafness. We report the case of a 31-year-old black male diagnosed as having KID syndrome. Sequencing analysis showed a heterozygous missense mutation D50N (148G > A) in the GJB2 gene. In addition to the classical features of vascularizing keratitis, erythrokeratoderma and congenital deafness, our patient presented a follicular occlusion triad with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS, alias acne inversa), acne conglobata and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, leading to cicatricial alopecia and disfiguring, inflammatory vegetations of his scalp. Conservative therapy such as a keratolytic, rehydrating and antiseptic external therapy, antibiotic, antimycotic and retinoids were only of moderate benefit, so we finally chose the curative possibility of surgery therapy of the axillar papillomas and of the scalp. The inflammatory papillomatous regions of the axillae and of the scalp were radically debrided. Clean granulation was awaited and covered in a second session with a mesh graft from the thigh, achieving a satisfactory result. To our knowledge, only one case of KID syndrome occurring in association with follicular occlusion triad has been reported before.
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ranking = 18.452496047346
keywords = hidradenitis
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7/10. Follicular occlusion triad: hidradenitis suppurativa, acne conglobata, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp.

    The pathophysiology and treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa, acne conglobata, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, which constitute the follicular occlusion triad, are reviewed. The unusual occurrence of all three components in a single patient resistant to medical management is presented with a review of the literature. This patient's course was complicated by multiple synchronous squamous cell carcinomas developing in a localized area where his acne conglobata was most pronounced. Although one lesion was clinically obvious, the majority were less suspicious for cancer. Occult cancer should be considered in recalcitrant cases of acne conglobata where isolated areas fail to respond to medical management, particularly when 13-cis-retinoic acid has been used.
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ranking = 92.262480236729
keywords = hidradenitis
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8/10. Neutrophilic dermatosis of myeloproliferative disease in a 10-year-old.

    The initial features of acute myeloid leukemia in a previously well 10-year-old girl consisted of cellulitic lesions on the face and limbs. These lesions subsequently progressed, with superimposed blistering and pustulation. They were painful and tender. The condition did not respond to systemic broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. skin biopsy showed an intense, dermal neutrophilic infiltrate without additional evidence of infection or leukemic deposits. The cutaneous lesions responded promptly to high-dose systemic corticosteroids, and the leukemia to chemotherapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neutrophilic
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9/10. Necrotic cellulitis. A localized form of septic vasculitis.

    Cutaneous biopsy specimens from two patients with localized, bacterial, necrotic cellulitis showed a neutrophilic vasculitis with fibrin thrombi, changes indistinguishable from those seen in a third patient with bacterial septicemia. Additional clinical information may be needed before a definitive diagnosis of localized or systemic septic vasculitis can be made with certainty. The clinical and microscopic features of the lesions and their pathologic mechanisms are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neutrophilic
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10/10. Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis simulating orbital cellulitis.

    Orbital swelling in patients with cancer can reflect neoplastic or infectious processes. Accurate diagnosis can be especially difficult in the face of associated fever and neutropenia. We treated a 30-year-old man undergoing induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia, who had fever of unknown origin and periorbital swelling suggestive of orbital cellulitis. However, the periorbital findings were more compatible with passive swelling and hemorrhage. A skin biopsy specimen demonstrated isolated neutrophilic inflammation and necrosis of the eccrine glands. Cultures of the tissue for bacteria and fungi were negative. Pertinent literature regarding eccrine-gland inflammatory disease was reviewed. This unusual entity, termed neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis, is most common in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy. Cases with infectious causes and cases in neutropenic patients have also been reported. No other patients, to our knowledge, with periocular involvement by neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis have been described. Neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis should be added to the differential diagnosis of cases of periocular hemorrhage and swelling in patients with cancer who receive chemotherapy.
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ranking = 942.02413474515
keywords = neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis, eccrine hidradenitis, hidradenitis, neutrophilic
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