Cases reported "Cellulitis"

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1/33. cricoid cartilage necrosis after arytenoidectomy in a previously irradiated larynx.

    Several open and endoscopic surgical techniques are available to provide an adequate airway for patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Transoral laser arytenoidectomy has repeatedly been reported to be a reliable and effective minimally invasive procedure for airway restoration. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of serious complications, other than poor vocal results, aspiration, and failed decannulation in individual patients, that have resulted from this intervention. We report a case in which arytenoidectomy led to severe complications and death. Prior irradiation is suspected to be a causative factor. To prevent such an outcome, we believe that operative settings should be chosen that avoid deep thermal injury of the laryngeal framework.
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2/33. The tarsal sandwich: a new technique in lateral canthoplasty.

    PURPOSE: Trauma and infection sometimes produce lower lid malpositions that are difficult to repair cosmetically with standard canthoplasty techniques. A new variation is described. methods: Surgical techniques of the tarsal strip canthoplasty and of lateral tarsorrhaphy are combined into the tarsal sandwich. RESULTS: Representative cases with preoperative and postoperative photos are presented. CONCLUSION: The sandwich technique allows the surgeon more flexibility in achieving the necessary vertical lift of the lateral canthus in difficult cases of entropion, ectropion, and lagophthalmos.
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keywords = operative
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3/33. Postoperative pneumococcal cellulitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    This paper reports a case of nosocomial pneumococcal cellulitis that developed following a lymph-node biopsy in a woman being treated with high-dose intravenous corticosteroids for systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE). Her rapid and severe clinical deterioration was similar to that caused by group A streptococcus. The risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumococcal cellulitis as a complication of SLE are reviewed and preventive measures discussed.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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4/33. Acute mediastinitis: a severe complication of transdermal therapy in a patient with ischaemic heart disease. A case report.

    Acute mediastinitis is an uncommon and potentially devastating infection. Generally, mediastinitis occurs as a postoperative infection following median sternotomy. We describe a case of acute mediastinitis in a patient with ischaemic heart disease, secondary to the spread of cutaneous infection of the chest wall in the application site of transdermal nitroglycerine patches.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/33. Simultaneous intracranial and orbital complications of acute rhinosinusitis in children.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of intracranial and orbital complications occurring as simultaneous but separate complications of acute rhinosinusitis in the pediatric population. methods: Records of children admitted to St. Louis Children's Hospital between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002 were reviewed. Relevant literature was reviewed with the assistance of medline. RESULTS: We identified 74 patients with orbital complications related to acute rhinosinusitis. A bimodal age distribution was identified with one group above and one group below the age of 7 years. The frequency of intracranial complications in pediatric patients already admitted for orbital complications of acute rhinosinusitis was 0% for those less than 7 years of age and 9.3% (4/43) for patients 7 years and older. If surgery was required for orbital disease, these risks were 0 and 24% (4/17), respectively. The review found that patients with dual complications had a mean age of 15 years, 11 months, were male (100%), had subperiosteal abscesses located superiorly or superolaterally within the orbit, and presented with significant frontal sinus disease. All intraoperative cultures were polymicrobial. MRI was superior to CT for identification of intracranial extension. CONCLUSIONS: Simultaneous intracranial and orbital complications are rare but significant occurrences in acute pediatric rhinosinusitis. Because of the high incidence of intracranial findings, we recommend MRI in addition to CT scan along with aggressive management in children older than 7 years of age admitted with orbital complications of acute rhinosinusitis who also demonstrate risk factors for intracranial disease. These risk factors are discussed.
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6/33. Hyaluronidase allergy after peribulbar anesthesia with orbital inflammation.

    A 70-year-old woman previously exposed to hyaluronidase during ophthalmic surgery had excision of hypertrophic bulbar conjunctival tissue in the right eye. Hyaluronidase was added to the peribulbar anesthetic agent. Five days postoperatively, the patient presented with proptosis in the right eye, extraocular muscle restriction, and decreased visual acuity. She was apyrexial with a normal white cell count; computed tomography of the orbits showed a diffuse increase in soft tissue density. Clinical features were unchanged after 24 hours of intravenous antibiotics, but subsequent administration of high-dose oral steroids led to clinical improvement.
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keywords = operative
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7/33. orbital cellulitis after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.

    We report a case of orbital cellulitis after uneventful phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation under peribulbar injection. The eyelid skin was prepared with chlorhexidine gluconate before the peribulbar injection, and the eyelid and conjunctival cul-de-sac were prepared with povidone-iodine before phacoemulsification. Five days postoperatively, the patient presented with reduced visual acuity and lid swelling. Ocular examination showed signs of orbital cellulitis, which was confirmed by a computed tomography scan. Oral erythromycin and metronidazole were given, after which the symptoms improved with successful outcomes.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/33. Phlegmonous gastritis associated with Kaposi sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    We report a case of phlegmonous gastritis associated with Kaposi sarcoma in a 37-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-positive man who presented with an acute abdomen. Computed tomographic scan revealed free fluid in the abdominal cavity and a thickened gastric wall. A partial gastrectomy was performed. The resected portion of stomach had a hemorrhagic, necrotic thickened wall and showed extensive, acute suppurative inflammation, especially in the submucosa, with focal transmural involvement. Beneath an area of healing ulceration, a focus of Kaposi sarcoma was present. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus was grown from peritoneal fluid, and treatment with numerous antibiotics was initiated. After a difficult postoperative course that responded to 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy, the patient was medically stable and discharged from the hospital on antiretroviral therapy for hiv. Phlegmonous gastritis is a rare and rapidly progressive bacterial infection of the gastric wall. Kaposi sarcoma is one of the most common malignancies in hiv-positive patients, and gastric involvement is relatively common in those patients with systemic Kaposi sarcoma. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of phlegmonous gastritis associated with Kaposi sarcoma, and it represents a rare survival following surgical and antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/33. Severe sepsis following wound infection by an unusual organism--clostridium novyi.

    We present a case of post-operative wound infection with clostridium novyi in a non-intravenous drug user. Clinical features included progressive cellulitis despite being on antibiotics, accompanied by hypotension, marked leucocytosis and oedema but minimal fever. While established infection with this organism is associated with high mortality, our patient survived. The administration of clindamycin and intravenous immunoglobulin in addition to early surgical assessment and aggressive debridement of affected tissue may have contributed to this successful outcome. To our knowledge, this is the only reported post-operative wound infection due to this pathogen.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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10/33. Cold urticaria: an under-recognized cause of postsurgical periorbital swelling.

    PURPOSE: To report cold urticaria as an under-recognized cause of potential periorbital and facial edema after elective oculofacial plastic surgery. methods: Retrospective case series of three patients with primary acquired cold urticaria with review of the clinical aspects of each of the cases. RESULTS: Two of the patients had significant postoperative swelling attributed to primary acquired cold urticaria after the routine use of cool compresses to their surgical sites. The third patient had known primary acquired cold urticaria and required special perioperative management. All three patients ultimately had a good surgical outcome with no long-term sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Although primary acquired cold urticaria is generally not a serious condition, it can be easily overlooked and misdiagnosed as a localized adverse reaction to injected anesthetic, topical antibiotic ointments, or early preseptal cellulitis after eyelid or facial surgery. Rarely, this condition can be fatal and should be recognized by the surgeon to ensure both optimal surgical results and general medical management. Three simple screening questions should identify most patients with this disorder.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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