Cases reported "Cellulitis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. Anaerobic cellulitis as the result of clostridium perfringens: a rare cause of vascular access graft infection.

    infection of prosthetic vascular access grafts is the second most common complication of vascular access and represents a challenge encountered by the vascular surgeon. Anaerobic graft infections are rare. We report on a case of a prosthetic vascular access graft infection with clostridium perfringens. To our knowledge, only one other case with an infected arteriovenous shunt caused by C perfringens has been reported. The patient, a 67-year-old woman with end-stage renal failure as the result of polycystic renal disease, was seen with an infected pseudoaneurysm at the arterial puncture site of the loop graft on the left arm. There was associated purulence at the time of operation. Surgical management consisted of complete graft removal because of the presence of small tunnel abscesses. C perfringens was found in the resected pseudoaneurysm and graft material. Infected pseudoaneurysms most likely are attributable to repetitive punctures in one small area and to a break in sterile technique. A compromised vascular supply, not infrequent in patients for hemodialysis, may lower the oxidation reduction potential, which allows anaerobic bacteria, such as C perfringens, to cause infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. Group B streptococcal retropharyngeal cellulitis in a young infant: a case report and review of the literature.

    The diagnosis of retropharyngeal cellulitis and abscess, although most common in children under 6 years of age, is often misdiagnosed in the newborn or early infancy period. The clinical signs of drooling, neck swelling, dysphagia, and torticollis may be absent or not easily identifiable. The following case report details a 2 1/2-month-old infant who presented with fever and irritability, and was subsequently diagnosed with group B streptococcal retropharyngeal cellulitis. Retropharyngeal cellulitis and abscess should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants and young children who present with fever and irritability, particularly when lumbar puncture results are normal. This case also serves to highlight a rare manifestation of late-onset group B steptococcal disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. haemophilus influenzae type b cellulitis.

    Five cases of cellulitis due to H influenzae type b in children are described. Cellulitis due to H influenzae type b should be treated in hospital using parenteral antibiotics in appropriate dosage to cross the blood brain barrier; it is recommended a lumbar puncture is performed in all cases of cellulitis in under two year olds, both to exclude meningitis and to allow the giving of steroids immediately prior to starting the first dose of antibiotics. Index cases and close contacts should be offered chemoprophylaxis to prevent spread of the organism. It seems likely that a vaccine against H influenzae b, effective in under two year olds, will become available in the next few years.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. Buccal cellulitis.

    Buccal cellulitis (BC) is an innocuous appearing infection of the cheek that is found in children and has a high incidence of concomitant bacteremia. Typically, the child is younger than 12 months and has a 2 to 8 hour prodrome of coryza and fever before developing the cellulitis on the cheek. A purplish hue on the cellulitic region is highly suggestive of Hemophilus influenzae bacteremia. The differential diagnosis is reviewed. A complete blood count, blood culture, and cellulitis aspirate culture, should be obtained on all patients with BC. meningitis may be present despite the lack of meningeal signs. A lumbar puncture should be performed on all children at risk for bacteremic BC. The vast majority of these children are bacteremic and require parenteral antibiotics. A typical case of BC is presented and its management is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. Minor trauma, disastrous results.

    An 81-year-old-woman developed a right facial palsy and orbital cellulitis following an apparently innocuous puncture injury of the right lower eyelid. Generalized tetanus ensued which proved fatal despite aggressive treatment including use of tetanus immune globulin, wound debridement, and neuromuscular blockade with ventilatory assistance. tetanus immunization status should be ascertained in all patients with potentially contaminated wounds in and around the eye. Cephalic tetanus, may be misleading initially because of the presence of cranial nerve palsies and the absence of classic signs such as trismus and risus sardonicus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    Most puncture wounds of the foot heal satisfactorily even without treatment. Nonetheless, serious complications such as osteomyelitis can occur. Early cleansing and debridement are important in preventing complications. Penetration of cartilaginous areas is a common prelude to osteomyelitis. Puncture wounds can serve as a reminder to both patients and physicians to update tetanus immunizations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Cellulitis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.