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1/33. Intracranial nasal dermoid sinus cyst associated with colloid cyst of the third ventricle. Case report and new concepts.

    A case of a 16-year-old male with both a nasal dermoid sinus cyst (NDSC) and a third ventricle colloid cyst is presented. The NDSC was excised via a single-stage combined intracranial-extracranial approach and the third ventricle colloid cyst was resected endoscopically. The pathogenetic theories of NDSC and third ventricle colloid cyst are discussed, and an embryological explanation for the simultaneous development of the two lesions in this patient is explored. This case is best classified among congenital developmental malformations in a category we propose to call 'anterior neuropore corridor defects.'
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2/33. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of a third ventricular colloid cyst.

    A 48-year-old man with no psychiatric history presented with memory disturbances, personality changes, emotional lability and mild paranoia with no evident mood disturbances. A colloid cyst of the third ventricle was discovered and surgically excised.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = ventricle
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3/33. Merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation and cerebellar cysts unlinked to the LAMA2, FCMD and MEB loci.

    We report a case of congenital muscular dystrophy with secondary merosin deficiency, structural involvement of the central nervous system and mental retardation in an 8-year-old girl from a consanguineous family. She had early-onset hypotonia, generalized muscle wasting, with weakness especially of the neck muscles, joint contractures, mental retardation and high creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed dystrophic changes with partial deficiency of the laminin alpha(2) chain. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple small cysts in the cerebellum, without cerebral cortical dysplasia or white matter changes. The laminin alpha(2) chain (6q2), Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy (9q31-q33) and muscle-eye-brain disease (1p32-p34) loci were all excluded by linkage analysis. We suggest that this case represents a new entity in the nosology of congenital muscular dystrophy.
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ranking = 0.004708328186285
keywords = cerebral
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4/33. Bilateral choanal atresia associated with nasal dermoid cyst and sinus: a case report and review of the literature.

    The relationship of choanal atresia to various systemic malformations is well acknowledged by the CHARGE acronym: colobomas, heart defects, atresia choanae, retarded growth and development, genito-urinary defects, and ear defects. In the past, we have reported the finding of an isolated skull base malformation associated with choanal atresia. We report here a unique case of choanal atresia associated with a patent foramen cecum and intracranial extension of a dermoid sinus. The embryogenesis of this condition is accounted for by the mesodermal flow theory of choanal atresia formation, and implies a need for thorough imaging of the anterior skull base in cases of bilateral atresia.
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ranking = 0.0099001595150836
keywords = foramen
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5/33. Lateral recess cysts in two cases of isolated fourth ventricle.

    We report two cases of isolated fourth ventricle with lateral recess cysts. The background, clinical features, treatment and outcomes are presented and discussed. We speculate on the association of these two conditions and propose possible explanations for the clinical features.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = ventricle
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6/33. Intracranial subdural hematoma after puncture of spinal meningeal cysts.

    A patient is reported with an intracranial subdural hematoma after puncture of spinal meningeal cysts. In this case, spinal meningeal cysts were diagnosed by myelography. No intracranial subdural hematoma was detected immediately after myelography. Deterioration in the patient's level of consciousness occurred after puncture of the cysts. The authors speculated that the cerebrospinal fluid pressure dropped rapidly when the spinal meningeal cysts were punctured. This displaced the cerebral bridging veins downward, tearing them and resulting in an intracranial subdural hematoma.
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keywords = cerebral
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7/33. siblings with development delay, mild spasticity and subcortical cysts: a further leukoencephalopathy?

    We present a family with mild neurological symptoms and intra-cerebral subcortical cysts on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common clinical features are microcephaly, learning difficulties, spasticity, dyspraxia and restricted movements of the neck and shoulder. The family has features in common with vacuolating leukoencephalopathy of van de Knaap and Olivier and may represent a new variant.
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ranking = 0.004708328186285
keywords = cerebral
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8/33. Multiple cysts in the cerebral white matter: a rare complication of whole brain radiation therapy.

    We describe a patient with multiple cysts in the cerebral white matter, several years after whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for a solitary cerebellar metastasis of a lung carcinoma. MR images of the brain show diffuse white matter changes, 1 year after radiation, and cyst formation in the white matter, starting 3.5 years later. We conclude that cysts in the cerebral white matter can be a late stage of white matter damage after whole brain radiation therapy in long-term survivors with brain metastases.
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ranking = 0.02824996911771
keywords = cerebral
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9/33. Endoscopic treatment for a huge neonatal prepontine-suprasellar arachnoid cyst: a case report.

    A huge prepontine-suprasellar arachnoid cyst was identified by fetal sonography and magnetic resonance imaging. It was successfully treated with a two-stage operation using a neuroendoscope. The first operation during the neonatal period consisted of implantation of a cyst-peritoneal shunt. In the second operation, the cyst was fenestrated with the aid of a neuroendoscope. The cyst membrane was seen to cover the foramen magnum and to extend continuously to the ventral surface of the brain stem. At the foramen magnum, it was pulsating synchronously with the pulsation of the vertebral artery, which was suggestive of the mechanism of cyst growth. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted to replace the cyst-peritoneal shunt. Endoscopic cyst fenestration is a less invasive alternative for the treatment of arachnoid cysts and can also be used for young children. In that case, however, special care should be taken to avoid complications, especially if the cyst exerts considerable pressure on the critical areas of the brain.
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ranking = 0.019800319030167
keywords = foramen
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10/33. Infratentorial supracerebellar approach to the colloid cysts of the third ventricle.

    OBJECTIVE: The transcallosal and the frontal transcortical approaches are the most widely used methods in surgery of third ventricle colloid cysts. However, these approaches require traction of the frontal lobe and dissection of the corpus callosum or corticotomy and involve some postoperative consequences. The rationale of the proposed method is to remove the colloid cyst by the infratentorial supracerebellar approach and the posterior wall of the third ventricle without dissection of any neural structures. methods: Five patients with a colloid cyst of the third ventricle were operated on by the proposed method. The first patient presented with several months' history of symptoms that included increased intracranial pressure and right-sided cerebellar signs, caused by a metastatic tumor of the right cerebellar hemisphere. The other four patients had symptoms including intracranial hypertension for an extended period of time without any other neurological deficits. In all patients, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a colloid cyst of the third ventricle without hydrocephalus. TECHNIQUE: With the infratentorial supracerebellar approach, the arachnoid of the quadrigeminal cistern is dissected. The pineal body is separated and displaced from the internal vein medially, and the posterior velum interpositum is opened. Perforation of the inferior layer of the tela choroidea just above the suprapineal recess allows opening of the third ventricle cavity. A foraminal region is exposed after a slight lateral displacement of medial surfaces of the thalamus along the third ventricle roof. CONCLUSION: The proposed approach through the infratentorial supracerebellar space and the posterior wall of the third ventricle may be used for removal of colloid cysts, especially in patients in whom the lateral ventricles are not enlarged.
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ranking = 1.7142857142857
keywords = ventricle
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