Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/2. Transcranial approach for venous embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    OBJECT: Transvenous embolization is effective in the treatment of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). Access to the fistula via the internal jugular vein (IJV) may be limited by associated dural sinus thrombosis; a transcranial approach has been developed for venous embolization in such a situation. The authors report their experiences with the use of a transcranial approach for venous embolization of DAVFs. methods: Ten patients with DAVFs underwent craniectomy and embolization procedures in which direct sinus puncture was performed. The DAVFs were located inside the dura mater that constituted the walls of the transverse sinus in five cases, the superior sagittal sinus in four cases, and the superior petrosal sinus in one case. All DAVFs drained directly into a sinus with secondary reflux into leptomeningeal veins. In all cases, the fistula could not be accessed from the IJVs. Craniectomy was performed in an operating room and, in seven cases, subsequent enlargement of the craniectomy was required. Sinus catheterization was performed after the patient had been transferred to the angiography room. The DAVFs were embolized using coils only in five patients, glue only in two patients, and both coils and glue in three patients. Angiographic confirmation that embolization of the fistula was successful was obtained in all cases. A transient complication occurred during the first case after sinus catheterization was attempted in the operating room. CONCLUSIONS: The transcranial approach allows straightforward access to DAVFs located on superficial dural sinuses that are inaccessible from the IJVs. The effectiveness of this approach is similar to that of the standard retrograde venous approach. The correct location and adequate extent of the craniectomy are essential for success to be achieved using this technique.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/2. Rapid cognitive decline following lumbar puncture in a patient with a dural arteriovenous fistula.

    BACKGROUND: Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are frequently accompanied with raised intracranial pressure and clinical findings suggestive of pseudotumor cerebri. However, unlike pseudotumor cerebri, the clinical response to lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal can vary from beneficial to acute clinical deterioration leading to death. The criteria for the safe use of lumbar puncture (LP) in patients with a DAVF are not well established. methods: A 61-year-old man presented with visual difficulty. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography revealed a left transverse sinus DAVF. He underwent multiple embolizations of arterial feeders over 3 years. He was then noted to have cognitive deficits in short term memory, listening, and concentrating. Over several days after an LP he became increasingly lethargic but arousable. Within hours after a repeat LP there was a rapid deterioration in the patient's level of consciousness and he became unarousable. RESULTS: A brain MRI revealed extensive dilated cortical veins and left temporal lobe venous ischemia without tonsillar herniation. A cerebral angiogram showed an extensive left transverse sinus DAVF with an occluded lateral transverse sinus and increased retrograde venous drainage. Embolization of the arterial feeders in combination with trans-venous coil embolization of the left transverse sinus reversed the patient's neurologic decline. He was discharged neurologically intact except for his chronic visual acuity problems. CONCLUSION: We speculate that when a DAVF manifests retrograde venous flow sufficient to cause cognitive deficits, lumbar CSF drainage must be undertaken with extreme caution.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)



We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.