Cases reported "Cerebellar Ataxia"

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1/26. Persistent cerebellar symptoms after infection with mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a 47-year-old man is reported. Symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection were followed by pneumonia and meningoencephalitis. In contrast to published cases with neurological manifestations of infection with M. pneumoniae, the patient was disabled by persistent cerebellar symptoms with generalized ataxia and atactic dysarthria. Some possible pathogenic mechanisms of the neurological manifestations of infection with M. pneumoniae are considered.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis, meningoencephalitis
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2/26. cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of lyme disease.

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.
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ranking = 0.93863477363603
keywords = encephalitis
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3/26. west nile virus infection presenting as cerebellar ataxia and fever: case report.

    Evidence of West Nile encephalitis virus infection has been documented in most states of the continental united states within a short period of its first introduction in 1999. Health care providers are mostly aware of the usual presentations of this disease, eg, aseptic meningitis, encephalitis and guillain-barre syndrome. We present a patient whose only manifestations were cerebellar ataxia and fever.
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ranking = 1.8772695472721
keywords = encephalitis
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4/26. Pre-eruptive varicella encephalitis and cerebellar ataxia.

    Varicella-related neurologic symptoms usually appear during or following the exanthem. Pre-eruptive neurologic manifestations are extremely rare. We report a 6-year-old boy who developed encephalitis, characterized by drowsiness and left-sided hyperactive deep tendon reflexes and cerebellar ataxia, both of which antedated the exanthem by 16 days. The diagnostic and public health implications are discussed.
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ranking = 6.7178368286201
keywords = encephalitis, varicella
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5/26. Paraneoplastic rhombencephalitis and brachial plexopathy in two cases of amphiphysin auto-immunity.

    Amphiphysin, a synaptic vesicle protein, is an auto-immune target in rare cases of paraneoplastic neurological disorders. We report two additional cases with distinct neurological syndromes and paraneoplastic anti-amphiphysin antibodies. The first patient, a 59-year-old man, presented with cerebellar and cranial nerve dysfunction and small cell lung carcinoma. The second, a 77-year- old woman, presented with left brachial plexopathy followed by sensorimotor neuropathy and breast carcinoma.
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ranking = 3.7545390945441
keywords = encephalitis
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6/26. Acute cerebellar ataxia in a child with transient pontine lesions demonstrated by MRI.

    A case of acute cerebellar ataxia with discrete signs of pyramidal and tegmental involvement is reported, several days after recovery from an upper respiratory infection of unknown etiology. magnetic resonance imaging showed transient pontine lesions, disappearing in the convalescence phase. Laboratory tests established the etiologic diagnosis of post-infectious encephalitis. An allergic autoimmune response with subsequent demyelinisation is assumed. The important role of MR-imaging in similar acute syndromes is emphasized.
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ranking = 0.93863477363603
keywords = encephalitis
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7/26. Varicella and acute cerebellar ataxia.

    In two cases of varicella-associated cerebellar ataxia, varicella-zoster antigens in CSF cells were shown by an indirect immunofluorescent technique. Direct viral invasion in CNS disease complicating varicella plays an important part in pathogenesis and rules out a single immune-mediated mechanism.
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ranking = 1.5366177006357
keywords = varicella, zoster
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8/26. Direct invasion of the central nervous system by mycoplasma pneumoniae: a report of two cases.

    We studied two patients with involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) associated with mycoplasma pneumoniae. One patient had encephalitis and acute cerebellar ataxia, whereas the second had a mixed picture of encephalitic reaction superimposed on a disseminated malignancy of unknown origin. Specific IgM antibodies to M. pneumoniae were detected in the patients' sera but not in their cerebrospinal fluid. M. pneumoniae was repeatedly isolated by cultures from throat swabs and cerebrospinal fluid samples from both patients. Our patients add to previous reports suggesting that CNS involvement may result from direct invasion of the CNS by the pathogen.
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ranking = 0.93863477363603
keywords = encephalitis
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9/26. Recurrent and pre-eruptive acute cerebellar ataxia: a rare case of varicella.

    This is a report of an unusual case of acute cerebellar ataxia in which the ataxia recurred after a 6 week interval and the second episode of ataxia antedated the varicella exanthem by 19 days, suggesting the direct invasion of the central nervous system by the varicella virus.
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ranking = 3.0369944406599
keywords = varicella
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10/26. Migraine coma. Meningitic migraine with cerebral oedema associated with a new form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia.

    A family with hemiplegic migraine has been documented for a period of over forty years. From this study and the literature we conclude that (1) migraine is a cause of recurrent coma which may be associated with life-threatening cerebral hemisphere oedema; (2) hyperpyrexia with CSF pleocytosis occurs in hemiplegic migraine, which may thus simulate viral meningoencephalitis; and (3) cerebral angiography is hazardous in hemiplegic migraine and may exacerbate coma and cerebral oedema. In the family reported, cerebellar ataxia was present during recovery from attacks of hemiplegic migraine and affected patients ultimately suffered from persistent ataxia with radiological cerebellar atrophy. This syndrome thus constitutes a distinct form of late-onset autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia and also of familial periodic ataxia. The status of 'cerebellar migraine' is reviewed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis, meningoencephalitis
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