Cases reported "Cerebellar Neoplasms"

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1/207. Third ventricular lesion masquerading as suprasellar disease.

    We discuss the case of a patient who presented with a bitemporal visual field disturbance thought to arise from chiasmatic compression secondary to a suprasellar mass. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with medulloblastoma with diffuse intraventricular disease. Careful review of magnetic resonance (MR) findings in this case demonstrate the apparent suprasellar mass to be within the suprachiasmatic recess of the third ventricle. The role of MR imaging in distinguishing between suprasellar disease involving the third ventricle and primary third ventricular lesions is discussed.
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2/207. Hemorrhagic cerebellar metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma has a low incidence of distant metastases. brain metastasis is extremely rare with a frequency of 0.1-1.3%. In the present series, the rate was 1.5%, only two cases had cerebral metastases in 136 patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma from January 1988 to April 1998. Cerebellar metastasis is even rarer, and solitary cerebellar metastasis has not been reported to the best of our knowledge. Two cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma with cerebellar metastases presenting as tumor hemorrhage are reported. In one patient, the lesion was in the bilateral cerebellar hemispheres with obstructive hydrocephalus. After operation, the patient had an uneventful course with recovery of her consciousness. In the other, the solitary lesion was in the left cerebellar hemisphere without obstructive hydrocephalus. After surgical treatment, the patient had a smooth course with resolution of his neurological deficit. It shows the importance of surgery in the management of a hemorrhagic cerebellar metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma, not only in reducing acute aggravating cerebral symptoms, but also in prolonging survival time.
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ranking = 0.26516716001651
keywords = cerebral
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3/207. choroid plexus papilloma of cerebellopontine angle with extension to foramen magnum.

    A case of choroid plexus papilloma resembling meningioma of cerebellopontine (CP) angle with its extension to foramen magnum is presented. Occurrence of this tumour in CP angle is very rare. Its extension towards foramen magnum is further rare. It was a real diagnostic enigma preoperatively as the tumour was resembling meningioma upto some extent on radiological study. Retromastoid craniectomy with microsurgical excision of tumour and its extension was achieved in toto. Tumour was attached to few rootlets of lower cranial nerves which were preserved. Attachment of the tumour with lower cranial nerves again caused diagnostic confusion with neurofibroma intraoperatively.
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ranking = 0.78904475243159
keywords = foramen
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4/207. Midline cerebellar cystic schwannoma : a case report.

    An extremely unusual case of a cystic schwannoma in the region of the inferior vermis and posterior to the fourth ventricle in a fifteen year old boy is reported. The cystic tumour caused partial obstruction to the outflow of cerebrospinal fluid from fourth ventricle and resulted in development of supratentorial hydrocephalus. On investigations, the schwannoma simulated a Dandy-Walker cyst. The boy presented with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure. On surgery, the lesion was not arising from any cranial nerve, nor was it attached to brain parenchyma, blood vessel or to the dura. The possible histogenesis of the cystic schwannoma in a rare location is discussed.
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5/207. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage after endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Case report.

    In recent years, endoscopic third ventriculostomy has become a well-established procedure for the treatment of various forms of noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy is considered to be an easy and safe procedure. Complications have rarely been reported in the literature. The authors present a case in which the patient suffered a fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after endoscopic third ventriculostomy. This 63-year-old man presented with confusion and drowsiness and was admitted in to the hospital in poor general condition. Computerized tomography scanning revealed an obstructive hydrocephalus caused by a tumor located in the cerebellopontine angle. An endoscopic third ventriculostomy was performed with the aid of a Fogarty balloon catheter. Some hours postoperatively, the patient became comatose. Computerized tomography scanning revealed a severe perimesencephalic-peripontine SAH and progressive hydrocephalus. Despite emergency external ventricular drainage, the patient died a few hours later. Although endoscopic third ventriculostomy is considered to be a simple and safe procedure, one should be aware that severe and sometimes fatal complications may occur. To avoid vascular injury, perforation of the floor of the third ventricle should be performed in the midline, halfway between the infundibular recess and the mammillary bodies, just behind the dorsum sellae.
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6/207. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in an infant.

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is a rare brain tumor and typically occurs in the superficial cerebral hemispheres of young subjects. We report a case of PXA in the cerebellum of a 3-month-old infant in view of its unusual location and age. The patient presented with a 1-month history of upward eyeball gazing difficulty. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of occurrence of this neoplasm in the cerebellum of an infant. We report the morphologic and immunophenotypical features, and literature review with regard to the clinicopathologic aspects of a case of unusual PXA.
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ranking = 0.13258358000825
keywords = cerebral
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7/207. hemangioblastoma of the third ventricle.

    A third ventricle tumor, in addition to a recurrent cerebellar hemangioblastoma, was found in a 47-year-old woman on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 5 years after operation of the cerebellar tumor. On MRI, the tumor was hypo- to isointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images compared with the normal gray matter, and was strongly enhanced with gadolinium. The tumor was first treated with fractionated conventional external-beam radiation (5120 cGy in 16 fractions over a 4-week period), resulting in a slight decrease in size of the tumor. For a definite diagnosis and mass reduction, surgery was performed using an interhemispheric translamina terminalis approach, resulting in a partial removal of the tumor due to profuse bleeding. Histological diagnosis was hemangioblastoma. Hemangioblastomas of the third ventricle are extremely rare and have not been specifically discussed. We describe the detailed clinicopathological features of the present case together with the possible explanation for the development of this tumor in this rare location.
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keywords = ventricle
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8/207. Contralateral cortical diaschisis in a patient with cerebellar astrocytoma after radiation therapy.

    Contralateral cerebellar diaschisis, hypometabolism in the cerebellum contralateral to a cortical lesion, is a well described phenomenon in patients with stroke and brain tumor. However, few reports exist of patients with cerebellar lesions with the finding of contralateral cortical hypometabolism. The authors present a case of a patient with a right cerebellar astrocytoma after surgical resection and radiation therapy in which fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic imaging, performed to rule out recurrent tumor, revealed global hypometabolism in the left cerebral cortex. The concept of contralateral cortical diaschisis and possible mechanisms and clinical implications are reviewed.
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ranking = 0.13258358000825
keywords = cerebral
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9/207. Posterior fossa tension pneumocephalus.

    Posterior fossa tension pneumocephalus (PFTP) is a very rare clinical entity--OFF few case reports available prove how rare. Five patients with PFTP are presented. All were operated on for posterior fossa lesions. One was operated on in the lateral position and the rest in a sitting position. All the patients had postoperative (early) neurological deterioration, and computed tomography (CT) scans revealed PFTP in the left cerebellopontine angle in one case and in the IV ventricle in the rest. air was aspirated from the posterior fossa in one case. All the cases were electively ventilated for 48-72 h. All the patients had an immediate onset of progressive neurological recovery after early intervention and elective ventilation. One patient died 10 days later because of a recurrence of empyema and the development of meningitis. PFTP is a rare but important complication of posterior fossa surgery. Early intervention and elective ventilation can produce a good recovery.
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10/207. ECT and intracranial vascular masses.

    In 1990, the APA Task Force on ECT cited no "absolute" contraindications to ECT but "Substantial risk" to be associated with ECT for patients with space occupying or other cerebral lesions with increased intracranial pressure and with bleeding or otherwise unstable vascular aneurysm or malformation. These findings indicate that patients with intracranial vascular masses are at increased risk for serious morbidity and mortality. Several authors have reported performing ECT in patients with intracranial vascular masses without adverse events by monitoring blood pressure both with and without pharmacologic intervention. Given the relatively recent change in practice of considering ECT for patients with intracranial vascular masses and the few number of cases thus far reported, we present a review of the existing literature and two additional cases of ECT performed with good result and no adverse events. With the cases we have presented, the literature now contains eight cases of ECT performed in patients with intracranial vascular masses, none of which had adverse outcomes. While such numbers do not establish unequivocal safety in this population, and the individual ECT practitioner must continue to make a risk/benefit analysis on a case-by-case basis, this report adds to the growing literature on the safety and efficacy of ECT for such patients.
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ranking = 0.13258358000825
keywords = cerebral
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