Cases reported "Cerebral Hemorrhage"

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1/407. Multiple postoperative intracerebral haematomas remote from the site of craniotomy.

    A postoperative haemorrhage is a common and serious complication of a neurosurgical procedure. It usually occurs at the site of the surgery, but on occasion a postoperative haematoma is found at a distance from the previous craniotomy. Multiple postoperative haemorrhages are extremely rare. We report the case of a 63-year-old woman, operated on for the removal of a supratentorial astrocytoma, who developed in the early post-operative period multiple bilateral intracerebral haematomas without involvement of the surgical bed.
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2/407. Massive haemorrhage into acoustic neurinoma related to rapid growth of the tumour.

    Massive haemorrhage into a acoustic neurinoma is very rare. A large size, mixed Antoni type and secondary vascular changes are thought to be causative factors. We describe a patient with a rapidly growing acoustic neurinoma which led to a massive haemorrhage. Rapid growth of the tumour seems to be another risk factor for haemorrhage.
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3/407. Pure apraxic agraphia with abnormal writing stroke sequences: report of a Japanese patient with a left superior parietal haemorrhage.

    A 67 year old Japanese male patient had pure agraphia after a haemorrhage in the left superior parietal lobule. He developed difficulty in letter formation but showed no linguistic errors, consistent with the criteria of apraxic agraphia. He manifested a selective disorder of sequencing writing strokes, although he was able to orally state the correct sequences. The patient's complete recovery after 1 month, without new learning, showed that he had manifested a selective disorder of writing stroke sequences. These findings indicate that the final stage of the execution of writing according to acquired sequential memory shown as a stroke sequence can be selectively disturbed, and should be considered to be distinct from the ability of character imagery and the knowledge of the writing stroke sequence itself. This case also indicates that the left superior parietal lobule plays an important part in the execution of writing.
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keywords = haemorrhage
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4/407. Cerebral bleeding, infarcts, and presumed extrapontine myelinolysis in hypernatraemic dehydration.

    The neuroimaging findings in an infant with hypernatremic dehydration are presented. brain parenchymal haemorrhage and extensive multiple infarcts were present in the acute stage. Follow-up CT showed bilateral, symmetrical changes presumed to indicate extrapontine myelinolysis in the thalamus and globus pallidus. MRI confirmed sparing of the pons. Only three previous cases of neuroimaging abnormalities due to hypernatraemia have been described in the radiological literature.
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5/407. Intraventricular hemorrhage as a false localizing sign of a thoracolumbar arteriovenous malformation: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Spinal arteriovenous malformation (SAVM) is a relatively rare disease characterized by a high incidence of intramedullary and subarachnoid haemorrhage. When the hemorrhage is profuse and the SAVM is in the cervical region the symptoms (disturbance of consciousness, papilledema, cranial nerve palsies, and convulsions) may be so severe and rapid in their onset that they may be mistaken for intracranial hemorrhage. We report here on a patient with a SAVM at T10-12, which bled intracranially, mainly intraventricularly, and resulted first in respiratory arrest and unconsciousness. CASE DESCRIPTION: The patient had been well until he was 28 years old when, during intercourse, he suffered a terrible headache and suddenly lost consciousness, with a transient respiratory arrest. He was also noted to have right hemiparesis. A computed tomography scan demonstrated intraventricular hemorrhage. After a 24-hour period of artificial ventilation the patient regained consciousness and the right arm paresis completely recovered, but a gradual worsening of the motor function of the left leg developed. Digital subtraction angiography did not demonstrate any intracranial source of bleeding, whereas spinal angiography revealed a SAVM located at the medullary cone, which was totally removed by surgery. CONCLUSION: The case reported here raises several important issues. First, the advisability of spinal magnetic resonance imaging in the investigation of intraventricular (and subarachnoid) hemorrhage in patients with no demonstrable intracranial source. Secondly, the benefits of early diagnosis and reestablishment of the spinal cord circulation before the onset of thrombosis and the progressive phase of myelopathy. Finally, the necessity of complete obliteration and treatment of SAVMs even in patients with fixed neurologic deficits, because rebleeding of lower thoracic or lumbar SAVMs can lead to impairment at a higher level with severe or lethal consequences.
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6/407. Unidirectional dyslexia in a polyglot.

    Alexia is usually seen after ischaemic insults to the dominant parietal lobe. A patient is described with a particular alexia to reading Hebrew (right to left), whereas no alexia was noted when reading in English. This deficit evolved after a hypertensive right occipitoparietal intracerebral haemorrhage, and resolved gradually over the ensuing year as the haematoma was resorbed. The deficit suggests the existence of a separate, language associated, neuronal network within the right hemisphere important to different language reading modes.
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7/407. Focal neurological deficits in children with beta-thalassemia major.

    The hematologic disorder beta-thalassemia major is relatively common in Southern italy. stroke is a well described, though infrequently reported, complication of this disorder. We now report our experience regarding 300 children with beta-thalassemia major examined at the University of Catania, italy, over a 20-year period. We encountered 9 patients (3%; 3 males, 6 females) with beta-thalassemia major who had hemorrhagic stroke. Two groups of patients can be identified: group 1 (2 patients 22%) with early-onset post-transfusion hemorrhage and group 2 (7 patients 77%) with delayed post-transfusion hemorrhage. In the first group, the hemorrhage occurred within 48 hours following blood transfusion. In the second group, hemorrhage occurred 7-15 days from last transfusion. In 5 patients out of 7 of this second group the first transfusion and ictal event both occurred after age five, suggesting prolonged chronic anemia might play a role in the hemorrhage.
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keywords = transfusion
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8/407. Intracranial haemorrhage due to factor v deficiency.

    factor v deficiency is a rare coagulation disorder which is inherited autosomal recessively. factor v deficiency should be considered in infants with bleeding disorders and prolonged prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times if bleeding continues in spite of vitamin k injection. In this article, the case of an infant with an intracranial haemorrhage due to congenital factor v deficiency is reported.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = haemorrhage
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9/407. A huge cystic hygroma of the neck associated with intraventricular haemorrhage in a term neonate.

    We report on a female term neonate who presented with a huge cystic hygroma of the right neck associated with intraventricular haemorrhage as demonstrated by computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies. She underwent extraventricular drainage and excision of the neck mass with stable postoperative condition. Psychomotor retardation was found thereafter. To our knowledge, the association of a large cystic hygroma of the neck with intracranial haemorrhage has not been reported previously. The possible mechanism of the occurrence of the haemorrhage is discussed.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = haemorrhage
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10/407. Human hypersensitivity angiitis: an uncommon cause of death after trauma.

    INTRODUCTION: The article demonstrates, using a case report, that death following an accident may have rarely encountered causes that are not a direct result of trauma and that can only be detected by autopsy. CASE: An unconscious woman aged 57 years was admitted to hospital. Despite immediate surgery for intracranial haemorrhage diagnosed by means of cranial computed tomography, the patient died showing clinical symptoms of circulatory depression after a brief period of stabilisation. The autopsy established myocardial infarction with hypersensitivity angiitis as the cause of death. CONCLUSION: In this case, the authors hold the opinion that the intravenous application of antibiotics during the patient's stay in hospital resulted in hypersensitivity angiitis. The factors causing hypersensitivity angiitis, the morphological picture (clinical, histological) and therapeutic measures are described.
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