Cases reported "Cerebral Hemorrhage"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/70. anthrax meningitis. Report of two cases with autopsies.

    The authors report two cases of occupation-related anthrax meningitis; one was direct contamination from a diseased animal; the second was due to handling of bone powder imported from india. The pathological pattern of involvement of the meninges and brain is described and discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/70. cleidocranial dysplasia with neonatal death due to central nervous system injury in utero: case report and literature review.

    cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), an uncommon disorder involving membranous bones, is rarely lethal in early life. The calvaria is defective and wormian bones are present. Abnormalities of the clavicles vary in severity from a minor unilateral defect to bilateral absence. This report concerns pre- and postmortem anatomical and radiological findings in a 15-day-old female neonate with CCD. Her postnatal course was characterized by seizures and recognition of hydrocephalus during the first day of life. The calvaria was hypoplastic with numerous wormian bones. A pseudofracture of the right clavicle was present. hydrocephalus was present in the brachycephalic brain which had a severely thinned cerebral cortex. hemosiderin in the ventricular lining and marked subependymal gliosis were interpreted as evidence of old intraventricular hemorrhage that had occurred in utero. A CCD-related condition, Yunis-Varon syndrome (YVS), is noted for early lethality and for developmental and secondary abnormalities of the central nervous system. The present case only partially matches the phenotype of YVS and might represent a part of a spectrum of phenotypic variants ranging from viable CCD to lethal YVS.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/70. Unilateral retinal hemorrhages in documented cases of child abuse.

    PURPOSE: To describe the occurrence of unilateral retinal hemorrhages in four cases of documented child abuse, including a case in which retinal hemorrhages were an incidental finding on routine examination. methods: case reports. RESULTS: Three children, 5 to 17 months of age, with suspected child abuse had fundus examinations with a dilated pupil as part of their evaluation. An additional child, 6 months of age, received fundus examination with a dilated pupil as part of follow-up for regressed retinopathy of prematurity. Each of the four children had extensive retinal or preretinal hemorrhages in one eye only. Three of the four had ecchymoses on the ipsilateral face or neck. Two had evidence of bone fractures on skeletal surveys. All four had neuroimaging that documented cerebral hemorrhage or infarct. In all four cases an adult caretaker was found responsible for shaking, choking, or squeezing the child. One child died. Two had resolution of retinal hemorrhage, whereas one required vitrectomy. All three had at least partial recovery of vision in the affected eye after amblyopia treatment. CONCLUSION: In cases of documented child abuse, unilateral retinal or preretinal hemorrhages may be present. Ophthalmologists should recognize that unilateral retinal or preretinal hemorrhages may be associated with child abuse.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/70. Management of penetrating injury to the petrous internal carotid artery: case report.

    We report the management of a penetrating foreign body injury to the neck with a length of fencing wire traversing the internal carotid artery within the petrous temporal bone and entering the middle cranial fossa. Discussion points include methods of haemorrhage control, as well as ligation versus repair or bypass as the definitive treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/70. Sevoflurane mask anesthesia for urgent tracheostomy in an uncooperative trauma patient with a difficult airway.

    PURPOSE: Proper care of the trauma patient often includes tracheal intubation to insure adequate ventilation and oxygenation, protect the airway from aspiration, and facilitate surgery. airway management can be particularly complex when there are facial bone fractures, head injury and cervical spine instability. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 29-yr-old intoxicated woman suffered a motor vehicle accident. Injuries consisted of multiple abrasions to her head, forehead, and face, right temporal lobe hemorrhage, and complex mandibular fractures with displacement. mouth opening was <10 mm. blood pressure was 106/71 mm Hg, pulse 109, respirations 18, temperature 37.3 degrees C, SpO2 100%. Chest and pelvic radiographs were normal and the there was increased anterior angulation of C4-C5 on the cervical spine film. Drug screen was positive for cocaine and alcohol. The initial plan was to perform awake tracheostomy with local anesthesia. However, the patient was uncooperative despite sedation and infiltration of local anesthesia. Sevoflurane, 1%, inspired in oxygen 100%, was administered via face mask. The concentration of sevoflurane was gradually increased to 4%, and loss of consciousness occurred within one minute. The patient breathed spontaneously and required gentle chin lift and jaw thrust. A cuffed tracheostomy tube was surgically inserted without complication. Blood gas showed pH 7.40, PCO2 35 mm Hg, PO2 396 mm Hg, hematocrit 33.6%. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage was negative. Pulmonary aspiration did not occur. Oxygenation and ventilation were maintained throughout the procedure. CONCLUSION: Continuous mask ventilation with sevoflurane is an appropriate technique when confronted with an uncooperative trauma patient with a difficult airway.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/70. A phase Ib/II trial of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 for renal cell carcinoma patients with pulmonary metastases: a case of fatal central nervous system thrombosis.

    BACKGROUND: interleukin-2 (IL-2) and granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are cytokines with nonoverlapping pleiotropic effects. In a prior Phase Ib study, this combination of agents exhibited antitumor effects in the lungs of four of eight patients with renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastases. We conducted this Phase Ib/II trial to determine the response rate of renal cell carcinoma patients with pulmonary metastases treated with continuous infusion IL-2 plus GM-CSF. methods: patients with renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastases were treated with 1.5, 2.25, or 4.5 x 10(6) IU/m(2)/day 96-hour continuous infusion IL-2 on Days 1-4, 8-11, and 15-18, and 1.25, 2.25, or 2.5 microg/kg/day GM-CSF on Days 8-19. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were treated per protocol, 14 of whom could be evaluated for disease progression. None of these 14 patients had >50% shrinkage of either total tumor burden or pulmonary metastasis. One patient developed Grade 5 neurotoxicity. autopsy revealed acute multifocal cerebral venous thrombosis as well as acute subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of IL-2 and GM-CSF may be associated with marked morbidity and, as in one case in this study, mortality. No significant antitumor activity was appreciated. Thus, the combination of IL-2 and GM-CSF, when administered at this dose and according to this schedule, does not appear to be active in renal cell carcinoma and is associated with significant toxicities. Further studies using this combination of agents should only be undertaken with extreme caution and particular attention to neurotoxicity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 248.63001388889
keywords = macrophage
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/70. Infected cephalohematoma associated with sepsis and skull osteomyelitis: report of one case.

    osteomyelitis is rarely complicated by an infected cephalohematoma. We report a case of an infected cephalohematoma associated with escherichia coli sepsis and osteomyelitis of the skull. This 37-day-old boy had E. coli sepsis, which had a poor response to antibiotic treatment. An infected cephalohematoma was found when he was 43 days old. Cranial computed tomography (CT) scanning showed cephalohematoma with abscess formation and underlying bony destruction over the left parietal region. Antibiotics alone could not eradicate the infection. Extensive incision, drainage, and debridement of the necrotic bone resulted in prompt improvement. Three weeks of ceftizoxime administered intravenously, followed by 3 weeks of cefixime given orally completed the treatment course.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/70. osteosarcoma of the temporal fossa with hemorrhagic presentation: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Excluding tumors of hematopoietic origin, osteosarcomas are the most common bone tumor, although involvement of the brain or cranial base is rare. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 16-year-old girl with an osteosarcoma of the temporal fossa presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage. The management strategy of this lesion, including the operative interventions, is described. INTERVENTION: Several modes of treatment were undertaken, including radical resection of the cranial base lesion and excision of the cavernous sinus after a cervical internal carotid artery-to-middle cerebral artery vein bypass graft. CONCLUSION: The patient was alive and without evidence of disease 11 months after presentation but died shortly thereafter of complications related to adjuvant therapies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/70. Fatal tumoural haemorrhage following decompressive craniectomy: a report of three cases.

    Three cases of large and deep seated anaplastic cerebral glioma were treated by bone and dural decompression. The patients worsened suddenly within 12 h of surgery and later died. Postmortem examination revealed a large intratumoural clot in each case. The effects of decompression and the probable causes of fatal bleeding are analysed in this report.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/70. Fatal invasive cerebral absidia corymbifera infection following bone marrow transplantation.

    A 56-year-old dairy farmer received a fully HLA matched unrelated donor marrow transplant for high risk CML in chronic phase. His early post-transplant course was complicated by a series of massive intracerebral bleeds and by sepsis related to a malignant otitis externa. The microbial pathogen isolated from ear swabs was found to be absidia corymbifera, but CT scan at the time showed no intracerebral extension. Despite neutrophil engraftment and aggressive antifungal management he succumbed. autopsy revealed invasion of absidia into the brain from the ear. We speculate that colonisation by absidia resulted from occupational exposure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cerebral Hemorrhage'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.