Cases reported "Cerebral Infarction"

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1/51. Fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery imaging of cerebral infarction associated with tuberculous meningitis.

    A 12-month-old girl presented with fever and vomiting. cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination revealed an increase of mononuclear cells and mycobacterium tuberculosis. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken two months after the onset showed cerebral infarction in the left basal ganglia, tuberculoma in the interpeduncular cistern and brain atrophy. The infarction was shown as central cystic lesions with surrounding hyperintensity in the fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) image. The cystic lesions were not differentiated from surrounding lesions in T2 weighted image (T2WI) because both lesions were demonstrated as hyperintensity areas. The hyperintensity lesion shown in FLAIR image may indicate border zone encephalitis. The FLAIR image is more useful than T1 or T2WI to detect the extension of the infarcted area and circumscribed change.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
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2/51. MRI in human immunodeficiency virus-associated cerebral vasculitis.

    Cerebral ischaemia caused by inflammatory vasculopathies has been described as complication of human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infection. Imaging studies have shown ischaemic lesions and changes of the vascular lumen, but did not allow demonstration of abnormalities within the vessel wall itself. Two hiv-infected men presented with symptoms of a transient ischaemic attack. Initial MRI of the first showed no infarct; in the second two small lacunar lesions were detected. In both cases, multiplanar 3-mm slice contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed aneurysmal dilatation, with thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the internal carotid and middle cerebral (MCA) arteries. These findings were interpreted as indicating cerebral vasculitis. In the first patient the vasculopathy progressed to carotid artery occlusion, and he developed an infarct in the MCA territory, but then remained neurologically stable. In the second patient varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection was the probable cause of vasculitis. The clinical deficits and vasculitic MRI changes regressed with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy.
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ranking = 5.018964944939
keywords = zoster, varicella zoster, varicella
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3/51. Neurological symptoms in patients whose cerebrospinal fluid is culture- and/or polymerase chain reaction-positive for mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    We describe 13 patients with neurological signs and symptoms associated with mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. M. pneumoniae was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 9 patients: 5 with meningoencephalitis, 2 with meningitis, and 1 with cerebrovascular infarction. One patient had headache and difficulties with concentration and thinking for 1 month after the acute infection. M. pneumoniae was detected, by means of PCR, in the CSF of 4 patients with negative culture results. Two had epileptic seizures, 1 had blurred vision as a consequence of edema of the optic disk, and 1 had peripheral nerve neuropathy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
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4/51. Japanese encephalitis with movement disorder and atypical magnetic resonance imaging.

    With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging, brain lesions associated with Japanese encephalitis are increasingly being recognized and correlated with movement disorder. Bilateral haemorrhagic thalamic infarcts on MRI, suggested as a characteristic finding in Japanese encephalitis were conspicuous by their absence in this case report of Japanese encephalitis.
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ranking = 7
keywords = encephalitis
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5/51. Serial magnetic resonance angiography in cerebral infarction after varicella infection.

    The case of a 1-year-8-month-old-boy with cerebral infarction after varicella infection is reported here. Brain magnetic resonance (MR) angiography revealed segmental narrowing of the left middle cerebral artery which became normal 8 months later. The MR angiography well demonstrated the time course of the vascular involvement in the present patient. In cerebral infarction after varicella infection, the proximal portion of the main cerebral arteries were frequently damaged therefore MR angiography is useful for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making. Moreover, serial MR angiographic studies can clarify the natural course of vascular changes in varicella virus-related cerebral infarction.
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ranking = 6.0735025041594
keywords = varicella
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6/51. Wasp sting induced neurological manifestations.

    Wasp stings generally cause local reactions like pain, wheal, flare, edema and swelling, which are generally self-limiting. Multiple stings can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, generalized edema, dyspnea, hypotension, collapse, renal failure or death. Unusually, they may cause serum sickness, vasculitis, neuritis or encephalitis. We report a case of a 40 year old male who developed focal neurological deficit 10 hours following a wasp sting, which was confirmed to be ponto-cerebellar infarction on MRI scan, and recovered within five days.
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ranking = 1
keywords = encephalitis
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7/51. Multiple cerebral infarcts due to varicella-zoster virus large-vessel vasculopathy in an immunocompetent adult without skin involvement.

    We report the case of a 52-year-old immunocompetent man with varicella-zoster virus large-vessel vasculopathy and multiple bilateral cerebral infarcts who had no history of skin involvement. Etiologic diagnosis was made by isolation of varicella-zoster virus from a cerebrospinal fluid specimen. The patient had marked improvement in mental status after acyclovir therapy was initiated.
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ranking = 18.00348704867
keywords = zoster, varicella
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8/51. cerebral infarction in a child. A case report.

    Cerebral infarcts in children are rather rare and in most cases no precise etiology is established. The authors describe a case of cryptogenetic cerebral infarction in a 9-year-old boy. The child presented an acute onset of hemiplegia in the right arm and leg, central facial palsy, dysarthria and steppage. The infarction was proved by Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laboratory and instrumental studies rule out all known causes of brain infarction. The only possible etiopathogenetic hypothesis was a varicella arteritis which occurred 45 days before the clinical manifestation.
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ranking = 0.86764321487992
keywords = varicella
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9/51. cerebral infarction and cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with tuberculous meningoencephalitis.

    A 38-year old female with underlying systemic lupus erythematosus was admitted with tuberculous meningoencephalitis. After an initial good response to anti-tuberculous treatment, she developed cerebral infarction and profound hyponatremia. This was due to cerebral salt wasting syndrome, which has only previously been described in 2 cases. The difficulties in diagnosis and management of this case are discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = encephalitis
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10/51. herpes simplex virus encephalitis presenting with cerebral infarction-like signs and neuroimages.

    A patient with an atypical presentation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis mimicking acute cerebral infarction was reported. A 48-year-old man developed left-sided hemiparesis, convulsive seizures, and loss of consciousness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed high intensity areas in the right frontal to parietal lobes on T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted images. Soon after admission with suspected cerebral infarction of the right middle cerebral artery region, the patient had high fever with frequent seizures and severe loss of consciousness. Laboratory findings including cerebrospinal fluid established a diagnosis of HSV encephalitis, and a state of apalic syndrome persisted despite aggressive antiviral therapy.
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ranking = 6.1577761961414
keywords = encephalitis, herpes
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