Cases reported "Chlamydia Infections"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/37. A case of chlamydia trachomatis infection in a renal allograft patient.

    We describe a renal allograft patient with a chlamydia trachomatis infection. A 43 year-old man was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease in 1985 which necessitated the transplantation of a cadaver kidney in 1986. The kidney was rejected two years later. A second transplantation was performed in 1991. At the beginning of 1998 symptoms and signs of chronic renal failure and dysuria set in. Routine microbiological studies were negative. Cell culture on McCoy cell line was positive for an active infection with C. trachomatis--initially 3 , then 2 , 1 and negative following treatment. The patient was positive on the AMPLICOR CT/NG test (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Branchburg, USA) twice with OD values OVER--above 2 at 450 nm wavelength measured on an ELISA reader. The patient received treatment with azithromycin and doxycycline for 10 days following which the serum creatinine levels fell and the creatinine clearance values improved. Dynamic microbiological follow-up showed disappearance of C. trachomatis as evidenced by the negative PCR test. We conclude that the deterioration of renal function in our patient is complex but the infection with C. trachomatis is part of the complex of the underlying chronic renal failure and immunosuppressive treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/37. chlamydia trachomatis and mycobacterium tuberculosis lung infection in an hiv-positive homosexual man.

    A 31-year-old homosexual man, who was human immunodeficiency virus (hiv)-positive was admitted for fever and cough. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of diffuse interstitial reticular nodulation, and brain nuclear magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of nodular frontal lesions. Microscopic examination of sputum and other body fluids showed the presence of acid-fast bacilli and culture-only growth mycobacterium tuberculosis. serology for respiratory tract pathogens was negative except for Chlamydia. An antibody titer in the immunoglobulin g (IgG) class of 1:64 for Chlamydia pneumoniae and, unexpectedly, an antibody titer of 1:1024 for C. trachomatis were found. The patient was successfully treated with antituberculosis agents, and clarithromycin, for presumptive chlamydial infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/37. Recurrent pneumonia due to persistent Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    Two cases of recurrent pneumonia due to Chlamydia pneumoniae are described. C. pneumoniae was continuously detected from the nasopharynx in both patients by the polymerase chain reaction and/or culture even with appropriate antibiotic therapy during the first episode. After eradication of C. pneumoniae with long-term macrolide therapy, the respiratory symptoms of both patients completely disappeared and no relapse was observed. These data indicate that new treatment strategies may be necessary to eradicate the organism in patients prone to persistent infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/37. Chlamydia pneumoniae respiratory infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common cause of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in immunocompetent patients; however, its role as a respiratory pathogen in immunocompromised hosts has been infrequently recognized. We describe C. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection in a 19-year-old male after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The patient developed fever on day 14, and a subsequent computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a right lateral pleural-based opacity, which was then resected during thoracoscopy. diagnosis was made by culture and staining of the resected tissue with C. pneumoniae-specific monoclonal antibodies, and azithromycin was administered. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. pneumoniae respiratory infection after stem cell or marrow transplantation. C. pneumoniae often coexists with other etiologic agents of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Considering the infrequency of infections from this organism in this clinical setting, one must still rule out other more likely respiratory pathogens.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/37. coxiella burneti endocarditis in a patient with positive chlamydial serology.

    A 41-year-old man who habitually slept in a car park presented with a culture-negative endocarditis. Serological tests indicated infection with both coxiella burneti and Chlamydia psittaci. He was treated with doxycycline and clindamycin and required aortic valve replacement. culture of the excised value for both agents was negative but electron microscopy was suggestive of coxiella endocarditis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/37. Chlamydial infection preceding the development of rheumatoid arthritis: a brief report.

    chlamydia trachomatis-triggered reactive arthritis is a well-documented entity that has been extensively described. We do not have a clear understanding about the inflammatory oligoarthritis associated with the presence of this organism. It is rarely cultured from the synovial fluid, but is usually detectable by molecular biological techniques. Typically, chlamydia trachomatis causes a sterile but inflammatory oligoarthritis. We report an unusual case of inflammatory monoarthritis in a young woman in whom Chlamydia was isolated from the synovial fluid. This is the first case of documented isolation of Chlamydia from synovial fluid, which subsequently was diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/37. Persistent infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae following acute respiratory illness.

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is emerging as a significant cause of respiratory disease, including pneumonia and bronchitis, in humans. In this recently completed study of infection due to C. pneumoniae in patients presenting with pneumonia to SUNY health science Center at Brooklyn, we identified two individuals for whom cultures were positive on multiple occasions over a 1-year period. To determine the frequency of persistent respiratory infection with C. pneumoniae, follow-up specimens were obtained from nine individuals with culture-documented C. pneumoniae infection. Five of these individuals had persistent infection: four had a flulike illness characterized by pharyngitis, and one had bronchitis with prominent bronchospasm. All five individuals appeared to have acute C. pneumoniae infection as determined by results of serologic tests (titers of IgM antibody for all individuals were greater than or equal to 1:16). For three patients, cultures remained positive for 11 months despite therapy with 10- to 21-day courses of tetracycline or doxycycline. These observations suggest that persistent infection with C. pneumoniae may follow acute infection and may persist for many months. Infection with C. pneumoniae may be very difficult to eradicate with use of currently available antibiotics even if there is a clinical response to therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/37. Chlamydia pneumoniae arthritis in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    BACKGROUND: arthritis is an important and sometimes life-threatening complication in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient with CVID and arthritis due to Chlamydia pneumoniae, which is usually regarded as a respiratory tract pathogen and has not previously been detected in the synovial fluid by cell culture technique. methods: Routine bacteriologic, virologic, mycologic, and tuberculosis cultures were performed. The patient's synovial fluid was examined for fastidious organisms that might be causative pathogens of arthritis, such as chlamydiae, and special cell culture methods were used. serologic tests were performed to determine viral and bacteriologic etiology. RESULTS: The patient had a history of recurrent respiratory tract infections, and the latest exacerbation was followed by arthritis. Cytologic examination of the fluid yielded abundant lymphocytes. Chlamydia pneumoniae was detected in synovial fluid specimens by cell culture technique. Her nasopharyngeal swab and sputum culture specimens were also positive for this pathogen. She was diagnosed as having arthritis caused by C pneumoniae and was given antibiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Chlamydia pneumoniae should be kept in mind as a causative pathogen in patients with CVID and arthritis, especially when effusion fluid is full of lymphocytes rather than polymorphonuclear cells and no organism is grown on routine cultures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/37. culture-confirmed pneumonia due to Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    diagnosis of infection caused by Chlamydia pneumoniae, a newly recognized respiratory pathogen, has proved difficult. Between July 1987 and April 1988, culture and serologic tests for C. pneumoniae were done on specimens from 49 patients with pneumonia seen at an Atlanta hospital emergency room. Cultures from 3 patients (6%) grew C. pneumoniae. Genus-specific Chlamydia complement fixation titers and microimmunofluorescence titers for C. pneumoniae were suggestive of acute infection in all 3 culture-positive patients. Three other patients had evidence of acute disease by published criteria for antibody titers. Most studies of C. pneumonia have not had culture-proven cases; the 6% rate of positive cultures in this study support the role of C. pneumoniae as a cause of pneumonia. More widespread availability of simplified culture systems for C. pneumoniae is needed. Caution should be used when interpreting serologic tests in the absence of culture confirmation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/37. Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia with pleural effusion: diagnosis by culture.

    A case of Chlamydia pneumoniae pneumonia with pleural effusion in an otherwise healthy 19-year-old man is described. diagnosis was made by serologic means as well as by culture of both the nasopharynx and the pleural fluid.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = culture
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Chlamydia Infections'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.