Cases reported "Cholecystolithiasis"

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1/7. campylobacter jejuni: unusual cause of cholecystitis with lithiasis. Case report and literature review.

    A 51-year-old man presented with acute cholecystitis and the routine intraoperative culture of the bile grew campylobacter jejuni. The patient was cured by laparoscopic cholecystectomy without specific antimicrobial treatment. cholecystitis owing to Campylobacter spp. could be missed because a culture for Campylobacter is not routinely requested nor is it cost effective to look for it in bile or gallbladder specimens. Moreover, the fastidious nature of these bacteria dictates against their recovery in routine culture. Because this is a rare infection at this site, a review of the literature on this infection is included.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/7. Cholelithoptysis: an unusual delayed complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    We report the case of a 54-year old woman who presented with a persistent right lower lobe pneumonia followed by cholelithoptysis, 11 months after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It is postulated that this was a result of the formation of a subphrenic abscess secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. It is concluded that spillage of gallstones at laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not as benign as previously thought and that efforts to prevent spillage should include scrupulous operative technique, especially in the presence of gallbladder inflammation, and especial care when removing the gallbladder from the abdominal cavity.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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3/7. Retained common bile duct stone as a consequence of a fundus-first laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    The fundus-first technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy provides an alternative to the conventional dissection technique in patients at high risk for conversion to open cholecystectomy or at risk for bile duct injury. We report the complication of a retained common bile duct (CBD) stone after utilizing this technique. Intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) was not performed due to the concern for causing CBD injury in a patient with significant periductal inflammation and no risk factors for CBD stones. Following discharge, the patient developed scleral icterus 3 days later and returned for evaluation. He required endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for removal of a CBD stone. None of the four series reporting on this technique have described this complication. It should now be recognized that there is a risk of displacing a gallstone into the CBD in utilizing this technique. This report highlights the importance of intraoperative imaging of the CBD when using this technique, even in patients considered to be at low risk for having CBD stones. If IOC is considered hazardous, then intraoperative ultrasound should be the modality of choice.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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4/7. Simultaneous laparoscopic treatment for diseases of the gallbladder, stomach, and colon.

    We describe a successful simultaneous laparoscopic treatment of a gallstone and gastric and colonic neoplasms. The patient was a 72-year-old man with epigastric discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a gallstone 2 cm in diameter. gastroscopy revealed a 3-cm protruding submucosal tumor in the gastric fundus and colonoscopy revealed a 2-cm sessile lesion in the sigmoid colon. He underwent simultaneous laparoscopic treatment of the 3 organs because of the high risk of perforation or bleeding after gastric or colonic resection. This required the use of 5 ports, and a 3.5-cm incision was made in the left lower quadrant to access the 3 organs. The laparoscopic procedures consisted of cholecystectomy, partial stapled resection of the gastric fundus, and partial resection of the sigmoid colon. The histopathologic diagnoses were chronic cholecystitis, leiomyoma of the stomach, and tubulovillous adenoma with severe dysplasia of the colon. The operation took 183 minutes and blood loss was minimal. The patient started oral intake from the second postoperative day and was discharged uneventfully. He had from no postoperative complications or abdominal symptoms during a 15-month follow-up period. To our knowledge, this is a first successful clinical report of simultaneous laparoscopic treatment of 3 organ disorders.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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5/7. Laparoscopic derotation and cholecystectomy for torsion gallbladder.

    Torsion of the gallbladder is an unusual cause of gangrenous cholecystitis. Even with the advent of recent radiological imaging modalities, the preoperative diagnosis of this entity remains elusive. Herein, we present a case of gallbladder torsion in a 76-year-old lady who successfully underwent laparoscopic derotation and cholecystectomy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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6/7. Biliobiliary fistulas manifested by worsening liver function--a case report.

    We report a case of cholecystolithiasis with biliobiliary fistulas from gallbladder to hepatic ducts, which were manifested by worsening liver dysfunction. Although it was not diagnosed preoperatively, it was successfully treated by cholecystectomy with closure of fistulas by the gallbladder wall. This case suggests that an internal biliary fistula may be possible, when the gallbladder wall is thickened and shrunken in the case of cholecystolithiasis, accompanied with liver dysfunction despite no dilatation of the common bile duct.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/7. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with a biventricular cardiac assist device.

    Evaluation and management of abdominal pathology in patients with ventricular assist devices is likely to become increasingly important as the utilization of these devices expands. Ventricular assist devices represent a class of intracorporeal or paracorporeal mechanical devices that augment cardiac output in patients with congestive heart failure. patients with ventricular assist devices supporting both right and left ventricles (biventricular assist devices) are uniquely challenging to the general surgeon because these devices restrict direct access to the abdominal cavity and because of the perioperative implications of biventricular heart failure. We describe herein the first reported successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with a paracorporeal biventricular assist device. cholecystectomy was performed in this patient for acute cholecystitis that occurred while the patient was awaiting heart transplantation. Our results add weight to the small body of evidence that laparoscopy is well tolerated in ventricular assist devices patients. The unique aspects of the biventricular assist device patient make laparoscopic abdominal intervention particularly suitable in this patient population.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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