Cases reported "Cholestasis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/308. Vascular reconstruction of the hepatic artery using the gastroepiploic artery: a case report.

    A 59 year-old woman with obstructive jaundice secondary to proximal bile duct carcinoma underwent percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTDB). This revealed complete obstruction of the bifurcation of the hilar hepatic duct and encasement of the right hepatic artery. Wedged hilar hepatectomy with combined resection of the extrahepatic bile duct, gallbladder, and the encased right hepatic artery was performed. The hepatic artery was reconstructed using an in situ right gastroepiploic artery (GEA) pedicle graft. The anastomosis was protected with fatty tissue from the greater omentum. This technique can be used to reconstruct the hepatic artery after radical surgery for malignant hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/308. Percutaneous bowel drainage for jaundice due to afferent loop obstruction following pancreatoduodenectomy: report of a case.

    A case of jaundice due to an obstruction of the afferent loop following a pancreatoduodenectomy is presented. The dilated loop of the jejunum was drained percutaneously with a 12-F gastrostomy tube. Localized peritonitis around the puncture site was managed conservatively and the obstructive jaundice improved. The treatment strategy for this type of jaundice is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/308. Palliative transhepatic biliary drainage and enteral nutrition.

    Simultaneous intestinal and biliary obstruction is a rare but agonizing complication of metastatic abdominal cancer. Although endoscopic procedures exist that relieve jaundice or restore enteral nutrition, they can be impossible to perform for technical or anatomical reasons. We propose a palliative approach for these patients that includes transcutaneous common bile duct drainage, progressive dilation of the transhepatic channel over 1 wk, and, finally, insertion of a permanent silicon catheter that drains bile into the duodenum and is combined with an enteral feeding line. We report three patients whose metastatic abdominal tumors had led to simultaneous jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction, neither of which could be treated endoscopically. In all patients, the transcutaneous bile drainage catheter combined with the enteral feeding line was inserted and tumor symptoms resolved rapidly. As a result, the patients chose to return to home care with enteral nutrition and pain medication. The creation of a transhepatic access for simultaneous enteral bile drainage and nutrition is a technically simple procedure that causes little discomfort to a terminally ill patient. It relieves the symptoms of tumor obstruction, and the option of enteral nutrition and medication can obviate the need for intravenous infusions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/308. Malrotation with recurrent volvulus presenting with cholestasis, pruritus, and pancreatitis.

    A patient aged 16 years was referred following numerous episodes of intense pruritus associated with persistently altered liver function tests. Ultrasound (US) demonstrated the superior mesenteric vein positioned more to the left than usual and abnormal orientation of the duodenum, consistent with a midgut malrotation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography the common bile duct, suggesting a malrotation with chronic or recurrent volvulus. A classic malrotation with 180 degrees volvulus was noted at operation. A second child previously thought to have recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis was noted to have ampullary distortion secondary to malrotation following presentation with an intestinal obstruction. pruritus and pancreatitis have not been previously reported with malrotation, although cholestatic jaundice has been described. The diffculties in diagnosis and the role of US are discussed. Ladd's procedure is the appropriate treatment for this condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/308. Mucobilia in association with a biliary cystadenocarcinoma of the caudate duct: a rare cause of malignant biliary obstruction.

    Mucobilia is a rare condition characterized by the accumulation of abundant mucus within the intra- or extrahepatic biliary tree. A variety of hepatobiliary and pancreatic neoplasms are mucin producing and have been associated with the development of mucobilia including biliary mucinosis, biliary papillomatosis, mucin-producing cholangiocarcinoma (MPCC), or cystic neoplasms of the pancreas or biliary tree (cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma). We report the case of 46 year-old male with a biliary cystadenocarcinoma of the caudate lobe which resulted in chronic biliary obstruction and relapsing cholangitis. A review of the literature for both mucobilia and biliary cystadenocarcinoma is provided along with a discussion addressing the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for this rare entity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/308. Biliary tuberculosis mimicking cholangiocarcinoma: treatment with metallic biliary endoprothesis.

    A 58-yr-old patient who presented with obstructive jaundice was evaluated with ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). Diffuse irregular stenosis of the extrahepatic bile ducts and periductal ill-defined soft tissue density along the hepatoduodenal ligament was determined. The patient was originally misdiagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma and, because the extent of disease process made surgical bypass impossible, was treated with a percutaneously inserted metallic stent. Histopathological examination of the endoluminal biopsy revealed ductal tuberculosis (TB). Most of the previous reports in the literature indicated that biliary obstruction was due to enlarged tuberculous lymph nodes compressing the bile duct. To our knowledge, only three cases of biliary stricture due to tuberculous involvement of the bile ducts were reported previously. This case illustrates the importance of tissue diagnosis in all cases of obstructive jaundice to avoid missing rare but curable diseases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/308. Obstructive jaundice caused by placement of a nasoenteric feeding tube.

    Nasoenteric feeding tubes are a safe and effective means for providing nutritional support to the critically ill patient. Serious complications have been reported, but usually are the result of an improper path of the tube during placement. The authors report a case of ampullary obstruction and jaundice caused by a nasoenteric feeding tube, presumably caused by coiling of the tube in the duodenum. This report represents the first such case in the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/308. ticlopidine-induced severe cholestatic hepatitis.

    We report a case study of an 86-year-old female patient with severe cholestatic hepatitis who was undergoing treatment with oral ticlopidine 250 mg daily for coronary artery disease. The patient had nausea and vomiting and was jaundiced after taking ticlopidine for 6 weeks. She was admitted to the hospital for further evaluation. Ultrasound and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography eliminated the presence of biliary obstruction. Results from a liver biopsy showed a histopathologic picture consistent with cholestatic hepatitis. ticlopidine-induced cholestatic hepatitis has been reported 32 times in the foreign literature. This is the first reported severe cholestatic hepatitis (total bilirubin up to 43 mg/dl) case in taiwan. ticlopidine-related blood dyscrasia is a renowned adverse drug effect; liver function should be monitored in patients receiving ticlopidine therapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/308. Palliative treatment with metallic stents for unresectable gallbladder carcinoma involving the portal vein and bile duct.

    We report a case of gallbladder carcinoma associated with biliary obstruction and portal vein stenosis caused by massive lymph node metastases. The patient, a 59-year-old woman, was treated with self-expandable metallic stents--a spiral Z-stent in the portal vein, and a Wallstent in the bile duct--and intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. She returned to work immediately after leaving the hospital, and has been treated with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy once a week at our outpatient department. At present, she has good quality of life, with patency of both endoprostheses, 8 months after the placement of the metallic stents in the portal vein and the common bile duct. This case shows that portal vein and biliary stenting, together with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy, can be an effective modality for the palliative treatment of advanced gallbladder carcinoma involving the portal vein and bile duct, to improve quality of life.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/308. Conservative management of biliary obstruction due to fasciola hepatica.

    We report a case of temporary biliary obstruction due to fascioliasis. This case report shows that in Central europe, fascioliasis is one of the differential diagnoses of abdominal pain, especially if it is associated with eosinophilia. Successful medical treatment is possible even with obstruction of the bile duct.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = obstruction
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Cholestasis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.