Cases reported "Chondromatosis, Synovial"

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1/11. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis.

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis.
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2/11. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder.

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is a rare condition. The following is a description of such a case with the presenting symptoms, radiographic features, intraoperative findings, and the arthroscopic technique for treatment of this disease. Loose bodies were found in the long head of the biceps tendon sheath, the subscapularis recess, and throughout the glenohumeral joint, causing erosive damage. We feel that arthroscopy allows for better visualization of the entire glenohumeral joint, including the long head of the biceps tendon sheath and the subscapularis recess, and for ease of loose body removal. Additional advantages of arthroscopy include decreased postoperative pain, early active range of motion, shorter course of rehabilitation, and earlier functional return.
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3/11. recurrence of synovial chondromatosis of the glenohumeral joint after arthroscopic treatment.

    A case of primary synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder in a 15-year-old girl is presented. Plain radiographs revealed findings characteristic of synovial chondromatosis. The patient was treated by arthroscopic loose body removal and arthroscopic partial synovectomy of the glenohumeral joint. Although immediate postoperative radiographs showed no calcification in the joint, repeated radiographs at 18 months after surgery revealed recurrence of calcification in the subacromial space. Arthroscopic removal of all loose bodies and partial synovectomy appears to be a good method of giving symptomatic relief and early return to work. However, late recurrence should be anticipated.
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4/11. Giant synovial osteochondromatosis of the acromio-clavicular joint in a child. A case report and review of the literature.

    Primary intra-articular synovial chondromatosis represents an uncommon condition involving mainly the large joints predominantly of middle-aged adults. We herein document the first case of synovial chondromatosis affecting the acromio-clavicular joint of a 10-year-old girl, characterized by a solitary huge intra-articular osteochondromatous body (giant synovial chondromatosis) that had caused dislocation and deformation of the lateral portion of the clavicle. Successful surgical treatment consisted of removal of the osteochondral body and replacement of the clavicle by fixation with a K-wire.
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5/11. Rice-body formation and tenosynovitis of the wrist: a case report.

    A 61-year-old woman presented with mild pain and swelling on the volar aspect of the wrist, hand, and little finger. radiography showed a soft-tissue mass shadow, and magnetic resonance imaging showed acute tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons and an inflammatory mass inside the carpal tunnel. Laboratory test results were normal, except for an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (40 mm/h). The patient had an ambiguous Mantoux test result but no history of mycobacterial exposure. Exhaustive investigations for rheumatic disease were negative. Surgical exploration of the lesion revealed rice bodies in the common flexor tendon synovial sheath, extending distally to the tip of the fifth finger. Removal of the rice bodies and thorough excision of the sheath was performed. The patient regained a full and painless range of motion in about 3 months. One-year follow-up revealed no underlying disorder.
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6/11. Familial synovial chondromatosis combined with dwarfism.

    In a family with synovial chondromatosis affecting at least three, presumably five members, the articular disorder was combined with dwarfism. The persons with joint disorders were below the third percentile in body height, but family members with normal articular function had normal height. We believe this to be the first description of a combination of synovial chondromatosis with genetically caused dwarfism.
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7/11. shoulder rheumatoid arthritis associated with chondromatosis, treated by arthroscopy.

    We present a case of rheumatoid arthritis that affected the right shoulder and was associated with chondromatosis and multiple loose body formation. The arthritis was treated arthroscopically with satisfactory results after a follow-up period of 15 months. In our case, arthroscopic debridement and partial synovectomy not only relieved the pain but also improved the range of motion the night after surgery. The multiple loose bodies irritating the synovium and causing effusion, crepitus, and locking were also removed. One may need to change portals of the scope and suction cannula to remove loose bodies in different joint spaces. The subacromial space must be searched for loose bodies. Thorough cleaning, lavage, and synovectomy are important parts of this surgery. The continuous passive motion (CPM) machine in the immediate postoperative period was helpful.
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8/11. Synovial chondromatosis in the radiocarpal joint.

    A rare case of synovial chondromatosis involving the radiocarpal joint is described. Histologic examination revealed a cartilaginous loose body and mildly inflamed synovium. Histologic differentiation of this condition from synovial chondrosarcoma can be difficult because of the frequent finding of nuclear atypia. Surgical excision is recommended.
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9/11. Recurrent synovial chondromatosis treated with meniscectomy and synovectomy.

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign intraarticular metaplasia of synovium. This process may result in the production of detached particles of highly cellular cartilage in the involved joint spaces. It is most often reported in the larger joints of the body including the knee, hip, elbow, and ankle. Since Axhausen in 1993 reported the first case affecting the temporomandibular joint, several articles have been listed in the literature regarding the presentation, diagnosis, and management of this form of an arthropathy. This is a case of a recurrent synovial chondromatosis that was approached with a meniscectomy and a complete synovectomy.
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10/11. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: the effect of interleukin-1 on loose-body-derived cells.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of interleukin-1 on cells from loose bodies of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. STUDY DESIGN: The cells were isolated from uncalcified loose bodies in a case of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint and cultured in alpha-MEM medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum. The cells were treated with or without interleukin-1alpha and then stained with toluidine blue. Their conditioned media were analyzed with gelatin zymography to detect matrix-degrading proteinase(s). RESULTS: The cells from loose bodies produced toluidine-blue-stained matrix. When the cells were treated with 100 ng/ml of interleukin-1alpha for 3 days, toluidine-blue-stained matrix was strikingly reduced. gelatin zymography revealed that interleukin-1alpha-treated cells released 62-kDa gelatinase. CONCLUSIONS: interleukin-1alpha may lead loose-body-derived cells to degrade the cartilaginous matrix of loose bodies in synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.
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