Cases reported "Choristoma"

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1/52. Symptomatic heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper oesophagus.

    The presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper oesophagus has been reported to occur in up to 10 per cent of individuals but it is usually asymptomatic. We present two patients with symptomatic oesophageal heterotopic gastric mucosa and discuss the aetiology, pathogenesis, and management of the condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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2/52. Heterotopic sebaceous glands in the esophagus: histopathological and immunohistochemical study of a resected esophagus.

    A resected esophagus with numerous heterotopic sebaceous glands was examined in an attempt to determine whether esophageal heterotopic sebaceous glands are the result of a metaplastic process or a congenital anomaly. The present case concerns a 79-year-old Japanese man with numerous esophageal heterotopic sebaceous glands accompanied by superficial esophageal cancer. The resected esophagus possessed numerous heterotopic sebaceous glands, which could be seen clearly as slightly elevated, yellowish lesions. Histological examination of these glands, all of which were located in the lamina propria, revealed lobules of cells that showed characteristic sebaceous differentiation. Bulbous nests of proliferating basal cells showing sebaceous differentiation were occasionally observed in the esophageal epithelium. Of the antibodies against six different keratins used, only anti-keratin 14 labeled both the heterotopic sebaceous glands and the bulbous nests. Acquired metaplastic change of the esophageal epithelium is probably the pathogenetic mechanism involved in these unusual lesions.
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ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
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3/52. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus ("inlet patch"): a rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    We report the case of a 21-yr-old woman who presented with a perforation of an upper esophageal ulcer on a patch of gastric-type mucosa. Despite surgical closure of the perforation and reinforcement with a pleuro-muscular flap the patient developed an esophageal leakage and died in the postoperative period. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus is usually an asymptomatic abnormality, discovered incidentally during endoscopic studies carried out for some other reason; however, complications secondary to the inlet patch acid secreting capacity can arise, and this has to be kept in mind to elude life-threatening conditions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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4/52. Ectopic gastric mucosa in the oesophagus mimicking ulceration.

    We report two patients with ectopic gastric mucosa in the oesophagus in whom emergency contrast medium studies after traumatic endoscopy revealed broad, flat depressions on the right lateral wall of the upper oesophagus that could initially be mistaken for ulcers or even intramural dissections. However, the appearance and location of these lesions is so characteristic of ectopic gastric mucosa that confirmation with endoscopic biopsy specimens probably is not required in asymptomatic patients.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = esophagus
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5/52. Heterotopic pancreas of the esophagus masquerading as Boerhaave's syndrome.

    Heterotopic pancreas (HP) of the esophagus is rare. We report a patient with HP of the esophagus and review the presentation, treatment, and results of the nine previously reported cases. Two patients had cancer. This high incidence raises concerns that HP of the esophagus may be premalignant. Because surveillance endoscopy is not possible, all known or suspected esophageal HP should be treated surgically.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = esophagus
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6/52. Ectopic gastric mucosa causing dysphagia due to strictures in a boy.

    Ectopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus has been reported previously in neonatal autopsy series and encountered in adult esophagoscopies. Despite the usual asymptomatic course of the disease, symptomatic adults have been reported. However there is no report of a symptomatic child with ectopic gastric mucosa in the literature. A 12-year-old boy presenting with dysphagia due to strictures resulting from circular patches of ectopic gastric mucosa located in the mid esophagus is reported.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = esophagus
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7/52. Acid secretion from a heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus demonstrated by dual probe 24-hour ambulatory pH monitoring.

    Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus is frequently found during endoscopic examination. Although most patients with heterotopic gastric mucosa of the upper esophagus, referred as inlet patch, are asymptomatic, symptomatic patients with complications resulting from this ectopic mucosa have also been reported. Acid secretion by the inlet patch has been suggested in some reports. We report a case of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus, with secretion of acid, demonstrated by continuous ambulatory pH monitoring, and the improvement of pharyngeal symptoms after the use of a proton pump inhibitor.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = esophagus
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8/52. Primary adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising from heterotopic gastric mucosa.

    Most esophageal malignancies are either squamous cell carcinomas or adenocarcinomas arising from Barrett's esophagus. We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the upper esophagus (cervical esophagus) that was derived from heterotopic gastric mucosa. In a 73-year-old man cervical esophagectomy was performed, followed by pharyngectomy, laryngectomy, and palliative dissection of lymph nodes on both sides of the neck, after an accurate diagnosis has been made by esophagography and endoscopy. The resected tumor was smoothly elevated (2.5 cm x 2.0 cm) and was microscopically identified as a well differentiated adenocarcinoma with invasion to the submucosa. The origin of the carcinoma was found to be a heterotopic gastric mucosa, by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), immunohistochemical, and enzyme histochemical staining. To our knowledge, only 18 similar cases have been reported previously.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = esophagus
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9/52. A new variant of esophageal atresia associated with esophageal heterotopic pancreas.

    An infant with esophageal atresia (EA) and absence of gas on abdominal radiographs was found to have an obliterated distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Preoperative bronchoscopy and surgical exploration found that the reason for gasless abdomen was the atresia of the distal portion of lower esophagus, which also contained heterotopic pancreatic tissue. The type of trachea/esophageal anomaly found in this patient, with the association of esophageal heterotopic pancreas (EHP), has not yet been reported in the literature.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = esophagus
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10/52. Heterotopic gastric mucosa in the upper esophagus after repair of atresia.

    One year after neonatal repair of esophageal atresia, a boy had intermittent mild dysphagia. Rigid esophagoscopy showed what was thought to be some inflammation at the level of the anastomosis but, at 5 years of age, with flexible esophagoscopy, this was identified as a ring of heterotopic gastric mucosa. This ring of mucosa has remained stable with surveillance up to 9 years of age. Although islands of heterotopic gastric mucosa in the esophagus are well recognized, there are no published reports of this at the level of an anastomosis for esophageal atresia with its associated clinical implications.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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