Cases reported "Choroid Diseases"

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1/34. Sclerotomy in uveal effusion syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To report visual and anatomic outcomes after modified scleral surgery in patients with uveal effusion syndrome with retinal and choroidal detachment. methods: In five eyes of four patients with retinal and choroidal detachment and uveal effusion syndrome due to nanophthalmos, we performed pars plana full-thickness unsutured sclerotomies without sclerectomy. RESULTS: In all cases, uveal effusion with choroidal and retinal detachment resolved within 3 weeks, and all patients showed improved vision. The functional and anatomic results remained stable for over 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: Uveal effusion syndrome that is refractory to medical treatment (high-dose systemic corticosteroids) can be managed effectively by pars plana full-thickness unsutured sclerotomy without sclerectomy.
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keywords = effusion
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2/34. Choroidal effusions and hypotony caused by severe anterior lens capsule contraction after cataract surgery.

    PURPOSE: To report the clinical features and management of two patients with pseudophakic anterior capsule contraction with secondary tractional ciliary body detachments and hypotonous choroidal effusions. methods: case reports. RESULTS: In two eyes of two patients with pseudophakia, severe anterior lens capsule contraction and tractional ciliary body detachments, anterior capsulotomy (one Nd:YAG laser, one surgical), was followed by resolution of the ocular hypotony and resolution/nonrecurrence of the choroidal effusions. In both cases, continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis was used during cataract surgery. CONCLUSION: Anterior capsule contraction following pseudophakia may result in tractional ciliary detachment and secondary ocular hypotony. Radial anterior capsulotomy appeared to be effective in both cases.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = effusion
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3/34. CT-revealed choroidal effusions as a sign of carotid cavernous fistula.

    Choroidal effusions may appear as subtle abnormalities on CT scans. Recognition of choroidal effusions, however, is critical because they may be an early sign of ocular pathologic abnormality. After detection, the various causes of choroidal effusions, such as carotid cavernous fistulas, ocular hypotony, tumors, and inflammatory conditions, should be considered.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = effusion
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4/34. Pathogenesis of transient high myopia after blunt eye trauma.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the pathogenesis of transient high myopia after blunt eye trauma. DESIGN: Two observational case reports and literature review. methods: Refraction was measured in two patients with an autorefractometer in the acute and convalescent stages after a blunt eye injury. The anterior chamber angle, the ciliary body, and the choroid were examined by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) in the acute and convalescent stages. In one patient, the anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length were measured by A-scan ultrasonography in the acute and convalescent stages. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of the refraction, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, axial length, and the UBM-determined appearance of the choroid and ciliary body during the acute stage with the values during the convalescent stages. RESULTS: The first patient showed a myopic shift of -9.75 diopters (D) and an anterior chamber shallowing of 0.94 mm measured 3 days after trauma by an air bag inflation compared with the measurements at the convalescent phase. UBM showed an annular ciliochoroidal effusion with ciliary body edema, anterior rotation of the ciliary processes, and disappearance of the ciliary sulcus. Eleven days after the injury, these UBM findings normalized, and the myopia decreased to -0.75 D, 27 days after trauma. The second patient had a myopic shift of -8.9 D compared with the convalescent phase, immediately after blunt trauma by a firework. Seven days after the injury, UBM revealed a partial cyclodialysis in addition to findings similar to those in the first patient. Ten days after injury, a myopic shift (-4.75 D), anterior chamber shallowing (by 1.1 mm), and thickening of the crystalline lens (by 0.27 mm) were observed compared with the convalescent phase. Associated UBM findings confirmed the anterior shift of the lens-iris diaphragm. Seventeen days after trauma, the UBM findings, including the cyclodialysis, were normalized, and the myopia had decreased to -1.0 D. CONCLUSIONS: Transient high myopia after blunt trauma is caused by anatomic changes in the ciliary body and crystalline lens. The anterior shift of the lens-iris diaphragm caused by ciliochoroidal effusion with ciliary body edema and thickening of the crystalline lens from blunt eye trauma are involved in traumatic high myopia.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = effusion
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5/34. Reversal of blindness after transvenous embolization of a carotid-cavernous fistula: case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Reversal of blindness after the endovascular treatment of a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is exceedingly rare. It has been reported only once in a patient with a direct CCF. We report the first such case in a patient with an indirect CCF. Defining patients whose vision may recover is critical in coordinating the timing of therapy. Mechanisms of reversible visual loss in CCFs are discussed with the intent of elucidating the patients who compose this subgroup. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 65-year-old man had a 1-week history of blindness, chemosis, and proptosis of the right eye. ophthalmoscopy was compromised by diffuse choroidal effusion and corneal edema that obscured visualization of the patient's retina. INTERVENTION: Transvenous embolization through retrograde catheterization of the superior ophthalmic vein allowed complete coil occlusion of the lesion. The patient's visual loss improved rapidly, returning to normal within 50 days. CONCLUSION: Although CCFs frequently are associated with permanent visual loss, a subset of patients demonstrates reversible ocular findings. If the retina of a patient with a CCF seems normal or is obscured, the potential for visual recovery, even from blindness, should prompt emergent treatment.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = effusion
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6/34. Choroidal effusion and shallowing of the anterior chamber after adjunctive therapy with latanoprost in a trabeculectomized patient with angle closure glaucoma.

    PURPOSE: Choroidal effusion and anterior chamber loss can occur in a trabeculectomized eye either spontaneously or following aqueous suppressant drug use. methods: A 50 year-old women with complaints of pain in the left eye (LE) was diagnosed as angle closure glaucoma. She was treated medically and underwent bilateral laser iridotomy. Because of high intraocular pressure it was decided to perform trabeculectomy. During the follow up period, the bleb became flat and after 3 months the IOP was again 24 mmHg with timolol maleate 0.5% and dorzolamide twice a day. Latanoprost was added to the therapy of the LE. RESULTS: 12 days later the patient returned with pain and vision loss in her LE. The anterior chamber was diffusely narrow and ophthalmoscopy showed massive choroidal effusion. CONCLUSION: The possible mechanisms of this complication were discussed.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = effusion
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7/34. Malignant glaucoma due to drug-related angioedema.

    PURPOSE: To report postsurgery angioedema resulting in malignant glaucoma.Interventional case report. methods: Three hours after uncomplicated cataract surgery on the right eye, a 61-year-old woman developed angioedema with swelling of the parapharyngeal tissue. visual acuity deteriorated, and tonometry revealed an intraocular pressure of 60 mm Hg, with shallow anterior chambers, in both eyes. RESULTS: Ultrasound showed choroidal effusion on both eyes. intraocular pressure could only be controlled surgically by procedure to deepen the anterior chamber. The angioedema regressed after withdrawal of candesartan, an angiotensin ii antagonist that the patient had taken for 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: angioedema without urticaria is well documented in patients receiving angiotensine-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin ii antagonists. Drug-related angioedema may lead to a choroidal effusion syndrome with malignant glaucoma. Surgical intervention may trigger angioedema. Most important in treatment is withdrawal from the implicated medication and control of intraocular pressure.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = effusion
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8/34. Expulsive choroidal effusion: case report of a rare complication of intraocular surgery.

    A case of expulsive choroidal effusion occurring during extracapsular cataract extraction in a 75 year old woman is presented. The episode occurred at the time of insertion of the pseudophake into the ciliary sulcus. The woman had pre-existent filtering bleb and was hypertensive, factors which may have contributed to the episode. Although this is dramatic occurrence, it needs to be distinguished from expulsive choroidal hemorrhage which carries a much worse porgnosis. In this instant, management was expectant and patient attained 6/12 with over-refraction. It is recommended that patients who may be at risk for expulsive choroidal effusion should have in the bag pseudophake fixation rather than sulcus fixation to obviate pressure on the circular vascular arcade.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = effusion
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9/34. Hypotony and choroidal effusion induced by topical timolol and dorzolamide in patients with previous glaucoma drainage device implantation.

    Three patients with glaucoma drainage devices and one patient who had trabeculectomy with mitomycin C were treated with a combination of topical timolol 0.5% and dorzolamide hydrochloride in the late postoperative period to decrease the intraocular pressure to the target level. All four patients developed ciliochoroidal effusions with hypotony that resolved with the discontinuation of the topical medication. Aqueous suppressants can induce ciliochoroidal effusions and hypotony in the late postoperative phase in some patients with glaucoma drainage devices. Discontinuation of the medication usually results in the resolution of the choroidal effusions.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = effusion
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10/34. Perfluorocarbon liquid-assisted external drainage in the management of central serous chorioretinopathy with bullous serous retinal detachment.

    The differential diagnosis of serous retinal detachment (RD) includes Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, severe hypertensive choroidopathy, posterior scleritis, multifocal choroiditis, metastatic tumor, and uveal effusion. Some cases of serous retinal detachment occur as a result of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Typical CSCR generally affects healthy middle-aged males and is characterized by localized serous RD of the neurosensory retina and retinal pigment epithelium in the macula that often spontaneously improve within 2 to 3 months. On rare occasions, variant CSCR with bullous RD occurs which is frequently misdiagnosed. We report on a case of variant CSCR with severe bullous serous retinal detachment in the left eye that was initially treated at another hospital under the misdiagnosis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. Because the retinal detachment developed so fast that a laser could not be applied to all leaking spots, we performed a pars plana vitrectomy, pertluorocarbon liquid-assisted external drainage, and final treatment with an endolaser. The retina was well attached after this management.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = effusion
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