Cases reported "Chronic Disease"

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1/256. Gustatory otalgia and wet ear syndrome: a possible cross-innervation after ear surgery.

    HYPOTHESIS: The chorda tympani and Arnold's nerves have close approximation to each other and their cross-innervation is possible after ear surgery. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective study was performed with a temporal bone pathology case and two clinical cases as representatives of such a possibility. patients had severe otalgia and wet ear during gustatory stimulation. methods: A temporal bone pathology case was studied under a light microscope. earache and/or wet ear were provoked during gustatory stimulation. Wet ear was tested with iodine-starch reaction after the subject tasted lemon juice. RESULTS: The temporal bone specimen has clusters of regenerated fibers in the tympanic cavity in the area of the chorda tympani and Arnold's nerves, suggesting a possibility of mixing. There are regenerated fibers in the iter chordae anterius, showing successful bridging of the chorda tympani nerves across a long gap. Detachment of the skin over the operated mastoid bowl obscured signs in one clinical case. Another clinical case of gustatory wet ear showed objective evidence of cross-innervation with iodine-starch reaction. CONCLUSION: The detachment procedure and iodine-starch reaction were the proofs that the signs were related to regenerated fibers. This is the first report of gustatory otalgia and wet ear after ear surgery.
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2/256. Chronic subdural haematoma following caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia.

    Intracranial subdural haematoma is a rare complication of spinal anaesthesia. This report describes the case of a 31-year-old woman who presented with post partum headache following spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Bilateral haematomata were evacuated via burr-holes performed under total intravenous anaesthesia and the patient made a complete and uneventful recovery. The recognized causes of subdural haematoma are discussed.
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keywords = headache
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3/256. Colonic ulceration caused by administration of loxoprofen sodium.

    A 54-year-old female with chronic headache was admitted to our hospital because of hematochezia. She had routinely taken loxoprofen sodium because of severe headache. Emergent colonoscopic examination revealed ulceration of the cecum. After administration of loxoprofen sodium was discontinued and administration of sulfasalazine was initiated, her intestinal bleeding subsided. Two months after discontinuation of loxoprofen sodium, the colonoscopic examination revealed scar formation at the site of cecal ulceration. In this case, it was conceivable that the administration of loxoprofen sodium might have induced colonic ulceration.
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keywords = headache
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4/256. Systemic brucellosis with chronic meningitis: A case report.

    A young adult presenting with 11 months history of fever, headache, vomiting was found to have CSF lymphocytic pleocytosis with increased protein. His serum tested strongly positive for brucella (standard tube agglutination titre 1: 320) whereas CSF was weakly positive. He became asymptomatic on treatment with tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin with significant CSF response. This case is reported because of its rarity.
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5/256. Midbrain infarction: a rare presentation of cryptococcal meningitis.

    A 20-year-old farmer who had headache and fever for 1 month, suddenly developed left hemiplegia, tremor in left arm and titubation followed by deep coma. Cranial CT scan revealed an infarction in right crus of midbrain. His CSF revealed 66 mg/dl protein, 10 lymphocytes/mm3, and 70 mg/dl glucose. CSF was positive for cryptococcal antigen. He improved following i.v. amphotericin 0.5 mg/kg and fluconazole 200 mg daily, continued for 6 and 12 weeks respectively. Infarctions though rare in cryptococcal meningitis should be considered in patients with chronic meningitis with vasculitis.
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keywords = headache
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6/256. Massive subependymal hemorrhage caused by an occult vascular malformation--two case reports.

    Two patients presented with massive subependymal hemorrhage caused by vascular anomalies occult to angiography, computed tomography (CT) scanning, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A 47-year-old male initially presented with a headache and became comatose 3 weeks later. CT and MR imaging demonstrated a massive hematoma in the right caudate head projecting into the lateral ventricle. A 60-year-old male sustained heaviness of his left extremities 8 days prior to admission and his condition gradually deteriorated. neuroimaging revealed a right thalamic hematoma adjacent to the lateral ventricle. cerebral angiography, CT, and MR imaging failed to detect any vascular anomaly. The hematomas increased in size gradually and were surgically explored. The histological diagnosis was arteriovenous malformation for the first case and cavernous angioma for the second case that had ruptured repeatedly. These cases were unique in the unusual location in the subependyma, and diagnostic neuroimaging modalities could not disclose the vascular anomalies, and the hematomas enlarged progressively to become critically symptomatic. Surgical intervention is mandatory for mass reduction and correct diagnosis of such lesions, with favorable outcome as long as the surgery is not delayed until too late.
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keywords = headache
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7/256. Eosinophilic meningitis. An unusual cause of headache.

    Human parasitic infections are uncommon outside the tropical north but common in animals throughout australia. The rat lung worm, angiostrongylus cantonensis, can invade the human brain to cause a chronic meningitis with prolonged headache. This condition can be diagnosed by finding a high eosinophil count in cerebrospinal fluid (CFS), the lumbar puncture also provides symptomatic relief. The outcome is usually benign but death has been reported.
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ranking = 18.75148785768
keywords = headache
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8/256. abdominal pain in children.

    Chronic vague abdominal pain is an extremely common complaint in children over 5 years, with a peak incidence in the 8 to 10 year group. In over 90 per cent of the cases no serious underlying organic disease will be discovered. Most disease states can be ruled out by a careful history, a meticulous physical examination, and a few simple laboratory tests such as urinalysis, sedimentation rate, hemoglobin, white blood count determination, and examination of a blood smear. If organic disease is present there are often clues in the history and the examination. The kidney is often the culprit--an intravenous pyelogram should be done if disease is suspected. barium enema is the next most valuable test. Duodenal ulcers and abdominal epilepsy are rare and are over-diagnosed. If no organic cause is found, the parents must be convinced that the pain is real, and that "functional" does not mean "imaginary." This is best explained by comparing with "headache"--the headache resulting from stress and tension hurts every bit as much as the headache caused by a brain tumor or other intracranial pathology. Having convinced the patient and his parents that no serious disease exists, no further investigation should be carried out unless new signs or symptoms appear. The child must be returned to full activity immediately.
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ranking = 11.250892714608
keywords = headache
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9/256. Unilateral proptosis resulting from giant-cell arteritis.

    BACKGROUND: Giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic, inflammatory vasculopathy that affects small- to medium-sized arteries. Arterial wall inflammation results in reduction of blood flow and subsequent ischemia. Arteries of the head and neck are particularly susceptible, including the ophthalmic and posterior ciliary arteries. The eye care provider is in a position to assist with the ultimate diagnosis of GCA. CASE REPORT: A 79-year-old black man was referred to the eye clinic for evaluation of exophthalmos of the left eye. The patient reported increasing proptosis over the previous 6 months; a history of sudden, permanent vision loss of the affected eye (approximately 2 years earlier); and generalized malaise and chronic frontal headache. Examination did reveal an exophthalmic eye of approximately 8-mm difference by Hertel exophthalmometry. Fundus examination revealed optic nerve pallor O.S. CT scan revealed chronic inflammatory changes of orbital tissue, including the extraocular muscles. No compressive lesions were present. Laboratory testing indicated an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. A tentative diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis was made, which was confirmed with temporal artery biopsy. CONCLUSIONS: patients with ocular complications secondary to GCA manifest several different ocular symptoms, including unilateral and bilateral intermittent blur, sudden complete vision loss, double vision, etc. This was an unusual case of GCA because the initially manifested ocular sign was unilateral proptosis. The patient probably had initial ocular complications of GCA 2 years previously, with sudden loss of vision in the left eye. The patient never sought medical attention at that time, and the unilateral exophthalmic eye resulted from chronic inflammatory orbital changes associated with GCA.
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keywords = headache
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10/256. giant cell arteritis presenting as chronic cough and prolonged fever.

    A 62-year-old man presented with a 3-month history of chronic non-productive cough and unexplained fever. Further questioning revealed that he had headaches and myalgia. Bilateral thickened temporal arteries were noted on physical examination. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 96 mm in 1 h. A biopsy specimen of the left temporal artery showed inflammatory changes consistent with the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. Commencement of prednisolone resulted in rapid and dramatic resolution of his symptoms. physicians should be aware of respiratory symptoms in patients with giant cell arteritis in order to avoid delay in diagnosis and therapy of this condition.
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keywords = headache
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