Cases reported "Cicatrix, Hypertrophic"

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1/3. Latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction of neck and axillary burn contractures.

    neck and axillary burn contractures are both a devastating functional and cosmetic deformity for patients and a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons. Severe contractures are more commonly seen in the developing world, a result of both the widespread use of open fires and the inadequacy of primary and secondary burn care in these vicinities. When deep burns are allowed to heal spontaneously, patients develop hypertrophic scarring of the neck and axillary areas. The back is typically spared, however, remaining a suitable donor site. We have used nine latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps in a total of six patients, finding the flaps effective in resurfacing both the neck and the axillary regions after wide release of burn contractures. Before flap mobilization, surgical neck release is often necessary to ensure safe, effective control of the airway in patients with significant neck contractures. Flap bulkiness in the anterior neck region can eventually be reduced by dividing the thoracodorsal nerve. Anchoring the skin paddle to its recipient site through the placement of tacking sutures will also help achieve a more normal anterior neck contour.
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2/3. Advances in burn care management: role of the speech-language pathologist.

    Because the inclusion of the speech-language pathologist in a burn management team is not widely practiced, we discuss our successes as members of a burn team. We also review speech-language evaluation and treatment strategies and present two patients with head and neck burns who gained from our intervention.
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3/3. Acne keloidalis nuchae and tufted hair folliculitis.

    Acne keloidalis nuchae is a chronic, scarring folliculitis that affects mostly black patients and is located on the back of the neck of young adults. The course is progressive and leads to hypertrophic scarring, chronic abscesses and hair loss. We discuss the relationship between acne keloidalis and tufted hair folliculitis, pointing out the possibility that tufted hair folliculitis is not a specific disease but secondary to other progressive folliculitis like folliculitis decalvans, dissecting cellulitis or acne keloidalis.
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