Cases reported "Cicatrix, Hypertrophic"

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1/9. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma arising in a thoracotomy scar.

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma arises most commonly de novo and rarely from sites of chronic inflammation. The authors present a case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma arising in a thoracotomy hypertrophic scar. The patient required large local excision of the tumor down to and including the muscle layer with postoperative radiation treatment. Factors associated with the occurrence of this sarcoma are discussed along with salient management principles.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/9. Hypertrophic scars after therapy with CO2 laser for treatment of multiple cutaneous neurofibromas.

    BACKGROUND: CO2 laser surgery is a treatment modality for cutaneous neurofibromas. OBJECTIVE: Hypertrophic and atrophic scars can result from treatment with CO2 laser surgery. We present a case of cutaneous neurofibromatosis that developed hypertrophic scars postoperatively. methods: Continuous wave CO2 laser surgery therapy was applied to the patient. RESULTS: Hypertrophic scars developed 2 months after therapy. CONCLUSION: With a preliminary test treatment the patient is able to see the expected result.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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3/9. Posttraumatic scar revision: a review and case presentation.

    Scar revision is a well-established procedure, but the achievement of satisfying long-term results may present a challenge. An appropriate initial management of wounds is of importance, since it has a role in determining the degree of revision required postoperatively. In addition to the conventional treatment and maturation of the scar tissue, a combination of procedures are now available which may alter the appearance of the final scar. Scar revision, followed by wound care that consists of silastic sheeting, steroid injection, and laser skin resurfacing with carbon dioxide laser (CO2), may be used as adjuncts to achieve camouflage of facial scars. Two case reports are presented to document the procedure, followed by treatment evaluation and protocol.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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4/9. Auricular composite graft for skin defect of the philtrum dimple.

    Our method of performing an auricular composite graft for a skin defect of the philtrum dimple in a patient whose lip is not damaged and has retained its original softness and elasticity is presented. After resecting the lesion, an auricular composite graft is harvested from the conchal region. The size of the graft is almost the same as the size of the resected lesion, although the cartilage is harvested in an elliptical shape, and its size is approximately 60% in area of the overriding skin of the graft. The graft is harvested from the site, which has a similar curvature to the defect. The cartilage is sutured tightly to the graft bed at a minimum of four points with 6-0 absorbable suture. The transversal axis of the harvested cartilage is sutured as vertically as possible so as to fit the direction of the wrinkle line of the upper lip. The skin is sutured to the defect margin using 5-0 nylon suture. The graft donor site is closed primarily. This method has been used for the closure of six comparatively large skin defects after resecting a skin lesion (pigmented nevus in three cases and hypertrophic scar in three cases) in the philtrum dimple in six patients. In all cases, the upper lip was not damaged and retained its original softness and elasticity. The "take" of the graft was complete in all patients, and the donor site healed without any problem. In all cases, postoperative shrinkage of the graft was not significant during the follow-up period, and the graft had a smooth surface. In addition, no patients suffered from a feeling of discomfort in moving the mouth, and an acceptable shape of the philtrum dimple was achieved in all cases. There were no deformational changes in the graft donor site. In conclusion, our method is valid in the patient whose lip is not damaged and has retained its original softness and elasticity and in whom a full-thickness skin graft is selected as the covering method for a skin defect of the philtrum dimple.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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5/9. Refinements of medial plantar flap used for covering nonweightbearing ankle and posterior heel defects requiring thin flaps.

    We present our clinical experiences with the refinements that we applied to avoid circular flap contraction and achieve thin flap coverage in the reconstruction of posterior heel and tendocalcaneal skin defects with medial plantar flap. Eight male patients, aged 18 to 35 (mean 24 years), with nonweightbearing skin defects, were treated with refined medial plantar flaps. All flaps survived and no circulation problem was encountered. The flaps adapted well to the recipient area, and thin and well-contoured skin coverage was achieved by postoperative month 6. As a conclusion, it is possible to reconstruct the nonweightbearing defects needing thin flap by medial plantar flap with adding refinements: (1) adding triangles around the flap, (2) harvesting a thin flap by excluding the thick plantar fascia, (3) harvesting a further thin flap by defatting of the flap, (4) application of pressure to the flap.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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6/9. mitomycin in the treatment of hypertrophic conjunctival scars after strabismus surgery.

    A recognized complication of strabismus surgery is the development of hypertrophic conjunctival scars over the operated-on muscle. Our standard treatment of these scars has been excision followed by corticosteroid eye drops, which results in a scar recurrence rate of 33%. Antimetabolic chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin, can reduce posttraumatic scarring and vascularization of the ocular surface. We studied the use of mitomycin eye drops as an adjunct to standard treatment of hypertrophic conjunctival scars after strabismus surgery. Four patients were treated with adjunct mitomycin eye drops (0.2 to 0.4 mg/ml). Postoperative follow up ranged from 16 to 56 weeks. None of these cases showed significant scar recurrence. mitomycin in the higher dosage caused mild superficial punctate keratitis after 8 days of use. Despite a lamellar sclerectomy in a patient treated with 0.2 mg/ml of mitomycin, there was no further clinically apparent loss of scleral tissue. The results of this pilot study suggest that topical mitomycin is a safe and effective adjunct to excision and corticosteroid eyedrops in the treatment of hypertrophic conjunctival scars after strabismus surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/9. Scalpel sculpturing techniques for graft revision and dermatologic surgery.

    BACKGROUND. Postoperative scars can be revised by a variety of techniques, including dermabrasion, laser, curettage, razor blade, and scalpel surgery. Most modern methods of scar revision provide good results but at the expense of time and economy. OBJECTIVE. We present our scalpel sculpting technique that uses the #15 scalpel blade to microshave and feather the skin edges to equalize differences in skin elevations caused by uneven healing. The superficial wounds then heal by second intention. methods. Sculpting techniques were used to revise side-to-side closures (grafts and flaps), trap-door elevations, standing tricones and hypertrophic scars. In addition, we used the sculpting technique to remove superficial blemishes such as actinic and seborrheic keratoses, skin tags, and other benign lesions. RESULTS. We have used scalpel sculpting techniques to revise scars and remove blemishes for more than 5 years. We have removed thousands of skin imperfections with very gratifying results. CONCLUSION. Scalpel sculpting techniques provide a simple, efficient method of scar revision and removal of superficial skin lesions. The technique reduces operative time and streamlines instrument reprocessing. Because of its simplicity, there is a high degree of patient, nursing, and physician satisfaction.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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8/9. The fasciocutaneous supraclavicular artery island flap for releasing postburn mentosternal contractures.

    Mentosternal contractures represent a surgical challenge to the plastic and reconstructive surgeon. We add the supraclavicular artery island flap to the armamentarium of surgical procedures to improve the function and cosmesis of disfigured patients. Since July of 1994, the supraclavicular artery island flap has been used at our institution for releasing postburn mentosternal contractures in eight patients. The flap was planned to be 4 to 10 cm in width and 20 to 30 cm in length with the supraclavicular vessels running axially. All donor defects could be closed primarily without significant postoperative complications in seven of the eight patients. All flaps healed primarily, achieving a good functional result by complete removal of contracting scar tissue for all patients; one donor site healed by secondary intention. We found the supraclavicular artery island flap both reliable and safe for immediate resurfacing after resection of cervical scars. The anatomy, operative procedure, and postoperative results of the supraclavicular artery island flap are outlined in this paper.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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9/9. The role of pre-expanded free flaps in revision of burn scarring.

    The authors present two patients affected by scars resulting from burning of over 60 per cent of the total body area, in which the pre-expansion of a free flap has been used to increase the tissue surface useful for transfer from the only area of residual healthy skin (left forearm, left parascapular region). In both cases it was possible to transfer abundant healthy tissue into the desired areas, obtaining a rapid release of the region, which made possible an early physical rehabilitation of the patient starting after the second postoperative week. One of the main problems encountered, when facing surgical rehabilitation for the seriously burned patient, is the poor availability of skin donor areas suitable for reconstructive flaps. The pre-expansion of free flaps provides an advantage in that it allows the few integral residual areas to be used, improving vascularization and therefore increasing the available surface. Furthermore, as pre-expansion reduces tension on the margins, it allows for the easier closing of the donor area, with a minor risk of complications and a better scar outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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